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colau
August 15th, 2009, 09:51 AM
Hi,
Why does update-manager prompt for:


linux-image-2.6.28-14
linux-headers-2.6.28-14
linux-image-2.6.28-14-generic
linux-headers-2.6.28-14-generic
linux-headers-generic
linux-image-generic

uname -r


2.6.29-020629-generic

colau
August 15th, 2009, 09:53 AM
ls -l /boot


-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 550328 2009-03-24 18:41 abi-2.6.29-020629-generic
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 97251 2009-03-24 18:41 config-2.6.29-020629-generic
drwxr-xr-x 3 root root 4096 2009-08-15 15:45 grub
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 7522777 2009-06-09 16:56 initrd.img-2.6.29-020629-generic
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 128796 2009-03-27 23:15 memtest86+.bin
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 1612304 2009-03-24 18:41 System.map-2.6.29-020629-generic
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 1074 2009-04-17 09:43 vmcoreinfo-2.6.28-11-generic
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 3541104 2009-03-24 18:41 vmlinuz-2.6.29-020629-generic

wojox
August 15th, 2009, 09:59 AM
Did you install 2.6.29-020629-generic from the update manager?

I've still got 2.6.28-14-generic and I check every morning.

slakkie
August 15th, 2009, 09:59 AM
I do not know, what does dpkg -l | grep linux-image give you and I assume you are running jaunty?

Jaunty is supposed to run on 2.6.28.x

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Ubuntu_releases#Version_history_of_common_ programs

Did you by any chance compile your own kernel?

colau
August 15th, 2009, 10:27 AM
Did you install 2.6.29-020629-generic from the update manager?

I've still got 2.6.28-14-generic and I check every morning.
Installed downloading the .deb package.

colau
August 15th, 2009, 10:30 AM
Did you install 2.6.29-020629-generic from the update manager?

I've still got 2.6.28-14-generic and I check every morning.
2.6.29 (http://www.ramoonus.nl/2009/03/24/linux-kernel-2629-installation-guide-for-ubuntu-and-debian-linux/)

colau
August 15th, 2009, 10:31 AM
I do not know, what does dpkg -l | grep linux-image give you and I assume you are running jaunty?

Jaunty is supposed to run on 2.6.28.x

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Ubuntu_releases#Version_history_of_common_ programs

Did you by any chance compile your own kernel?
dpkg -l | grep linux-image


ii linux-image-2.6.28-11-generic 2.6.28-11.42 Linux kernel image for version 2.6.28 on x86/x86_64
ii linux-image-2.6.29-020629-generic 2.6.29-020629 Linux kernel image for version 2.6.29 on x86/x86_64
ii linux-image-generic 2.6.28.11.15 Generic Linux kernel image

colau
August 15th, 2009, 10:33 AM
I do not know, what does dpkg -l | grep linux-image give you and I assume you are running jaunty?

Jaunty is supposed to run on 2.6.28.x

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Ubuntu_releases#Version_history_of_common_ programs

Did you by any chance compile your own kernel?

linux-kernel-2.6.29 (http://www.ramoonus.nl/2009/03/24/linux-kernel-2629-installation-guide-for-ubuntu-and-debian-linux/)

wojox
August 15th, 2009, 10:44 AM
That's one off the reasons I stay within the scope of Synaptic, is to avoid issues like such. Other than the update manager problem how is everything else working out for you? Any glitches or bugs?

There is a thread I read about a few days ago, or you can google it, which you can open synaptic and configure it to stop asking you for those updates.

colau
August 15th, 2009, 10:50 AM
That's one off the reasons I stay within the scope of Synaptic, is to avoid issues like such. Other than the update manager problem how is everything else working out for you? Any glitches or bugs?

There is a thread I read about a few days ago, or you can google it, which you can open synaptic and configure it to stop asking you for those updates.
Working fine with 2.6.29.

slakkie
August 15th, 2009, 11:06 AM
You need to pin your kernel package so that apt will not mention the upgrades to you.

eg



Package: linux-generic linux-headers-generic linux-image-generic linux-restricted-modules-generic linux-server linux-image-server
Pin: version 2.6.29
Pin-Priority: 1001


Put this code in /etc/apt/preferences. This will make sure that your kernel stays at 2.6.29.

See also:
http://jaqque.sbih.org/kplug/apt-pinning.html
http://www.debian.org/doc/manuals/apt-howto/ch-apt-get.en.html#s-pin
http://wiki.debian.org/AptPinning

colau
August 15th, 2009, 11:22 AM
You need to pin your kernel package so that apt will not mention the upgrades to you.

eg



Package: linux-generic linux-headers-generic linux-image-generic linux-restricted-modules-generic linux-server linux-image-server
Pin: version 2.6.29
Pin-Priority: 1001


Put this code in /etc/apt/preferences. This will make sure that your kernel stays at 2.6.29.

See also:
http://jaqque.sbih.org/kplug/apt-pinning.html
http://www.debian.org/doc/manuals/apt-howto/ch-apt-get.en.html#s-pin
http://wiki.debian.org/AptPinning

Thanks.
How can I completely remove all version of 2.6.28 from system?

slakkie
August 15th, 2009, 11:24 AM
I use this:



sudo aptitude purge $(dpkg -l | grep linux-image | egrep -v "$(uname -r)|linux-image-(generic|server)" | awk '{print $2}')


followed by removing old packages


sudo aptitude purge $(dpkg -l | grep '^rc' | awk '{print $2}')
sudo aptitude clean


Which are actually shell functions:



rmkernel() {
sudo aptitude purge $(dpkg -l | grep linux-image | egrep -v "$(uname -r)|linux-image-(generic|server)" | awk '{print $2}')
rmpkg
}

rmpkg() {
sudo aptitude purge $(dpkg -l | grep '^rc' | awk '{print $2}')
sudo aptitude clean
}


Put these in your .bashrc and you never have to think about it again :)

What is does, it looks at your current kernel version and deletes all kernels which do not match that version.

colau
August 15th, 2009, 11:43 AM
I use this:



sudo aptitude purge $(dpkg -l | grep linux-image | egrep -v "$(uname -r)|linux-image-(generic|server)" | awk '{print $2}')


followed by removing old packages


sudo aptitude purge $(dpkg -l | grep '^rc' | awk '{print $2}')
sudo aptitude clean


Which are actually shell functions:



rmkernel() {
sudo aptitude purge $(dpkg -l | grep linux-image | egrep -v "$(uname -r)|linux-image-(generic|server)" | awk '{print $2}')
rmpkg
}

rmpkg() {
sudo aptitude purge $(dpkg -l | grep '^rc' | awk '{print $2}')
sudo aptitude clean
}


Put these in your .bashrc and you never have to think about it again :)

What is does, it looks at your current kernel version and deletes all kernels which do not match that version.


rmkernel() {
sudo aptitude purge $(dpkg -l | grep linux-image | egrep -v "$(uname -r)|linux-image-(generic|server)" | awk '{print $2}')
rmpkg
}

rmpkg() {
sudo aptitude purge $(dpkg -l | grep '^rc' | awk '{print $2}')
sudo aptitude clean
}

If I put these lines in .bashrc, when would these be executed?(after reboot?)

slakkie
August 15th, 2009, 11:47 AM
no, you need to execute them manually.

If you define the function and then execute them eg




foo() {
echo foo
}

foo


THen this gets called everything you start a new shell.
To execute this at every boot, you need to create a script and put that in /etc/init.d and in /etc/rcX.d. But you don't want that!

diablo75
August 15th, 2009, 11:52 AM
Hi,
Why does update-manager prompt for:


linux-image-2.6.28-14
linux-headers-2.6.28-14
linux-image-2.6.28-14-generic
linux-headers-2.6.28-14-generic
linux-headers-generic
linux-image-generic

uname -r


2.6.29-020629-generic


I upgraded to 2.6.29 manually a month ago and recieved the same notice for updates. Go ahead and install the updates as they will not replace 2.6.29 and while new entries for 2.6.28-14 will be added, 2.6.29 will retain priority in GRUB.

colau
August 15th, 2009, 11:52 AM
no, you need to execute them manually.

If you define the function and then execute them eg




foo() {
echo foo
}

foo


THen this gets called everything you start a new shell.
To execute this at every boot, you need to create a script and put that in /etc/init.d and in /etc/rcX.d. But you don't want that!

Only these commands will do the job,won't these?(If I run in a terminal)


sudo aptitude purge $(dpkg -l | grep linux-image | egrep -v "$(uname -r)|linux-image-(generic|server)" | awk '{print $2}')
sudo aptitude purge $(dpkg -l | grep '^rc' | awk '{print $2}')
sudo aptitude clean

slakkie
August 15th, 2009, 11:55 AM
yes, but putting them in a function in your bashrc will make sure you can do this the next time you install a new kernel :)

colau
August 15th, 2009, 12:05 PM
yes, but putting them in a function in your bashrc will make sure you can do this the next time you install a new kernel :)
Thank you.