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vegetable92
August 13th, 2009, 06:22 AM
How can i reset the password on ubuntu 8.10.

vegetable92
August 13th, 2009, 06:26 AM
like is there something i can type in command to change the password or a way to make another admin account

aysiu
August 13th, 2009, 06:26 AM
http://www.psychocats.net/ubuntu/resetpassword

rsiddharth
August 13th, 2009, 06:26 AM
How can i reset the password on ubuntu 8.10.
Go to System--> Preferences --> About me . In the dialog box that appears , hit "change password ".

jrothwell97
August 13th, 2009, 06:26 AM
Welcome to the Ubuntu Forums!

To reset your password (assuming you've lost it and need to change it without knowing the old one), you need to know your username (the one you use to log in).

Restart the computer, and when the boot menu appears (you might need to press escape to make it appear) select one with recovery mode at the end. Once startup is finished, select root from the menu.

You will land on a full-screen terminal. Run


passwd <username>

replacing <username> with the name you use to log in. It'll ask for a new password.

Note that in a terminal, when you type a password in, the cursor doesn't move and no stars or dots appear. This is normal - your password is still going in.

Once you've finished, type


reboot

to restart the computer. All being well, you should be able to log in again.

Good luck!

vegetable92
August 13th, 2009, 06:36 AM
i can get into ununtu an it doesnt even ask for a password.but when i go to login window it asks for one.

colau
August 13th, 2009, 06:55 AM
How can i reset the password on ubuntu 8.10.


sudo passwd <username>
man passwd

go_beep_yourself
August 13th, 2009, 07:27 AM
Ok, let me tell you how it's really done, on any machine, as long as the filesystem isn't LUKS encrypted.

Boot up a live CD

Mount the / (root) partition

Assuming your root partition is /dev/sda1

And replace root in the following command with your username you log in with.



sudo mount /dev/sda1 /mnt
sudo chroot /mnt
passwd <user name>
sudo reboot


Remove the live cd.

You have just changed the password for of your Ubuntu installation.

If you need any more help, contact me via my blog in my signature.

:popcorn:

mcduck
August 13th, 2009, 07:31 AM
Ok, let me tell you how it's really done, on any machine, as long as the filesystem isn't LUKS encrypted.

Boot up a live CD

Mount the / (root) partition

Assuming your root partition is /dev/sda1

And replace root in the following command with your username you log in with.



sudo mount /dev/sda1 /mnt
sudo chroot /mnt
passwd <user name>
sudo reboot


Remove the live cd.

You have just changed the password for of your Ubuntu installation.

If you need any more help, contact me via my blog in my signature.

:popcorn:

Why make the task that hard? All you really have to do is select the recovery option from boot menu, and once the system is running run a single command (passwd username).

go_beep_yourself
August 13th, 2009, 07:38 AM
Why make the task that hard? All you really have to do is select the recovery option from boot menu, and once the system is running run a single command (passwd username).

Because with Ubuntu, to boot into single usermode, you must know the password to get a root shell, but with the instructions I provided, you don't need to know any passwords to reset the password. Infact, I could easily provide information to get his original password in a matter of seconds using a md5hash exploit in the /etc/shadow.

:popcorn:

mcduck
August 13th, 2009, 08:24 AM
Because with Ubuntu, to boot into single usermode, you must know the password to get a root shell, but with the instructions I provided, you don't need to know any passwords to reset the password. Infact, I could easily provide information to get his original password in a matter of seconds using a md5hash exploit in the /etc/shadow.

:popcorn:

No, you don't need a password to boot into single user root shell. Try it if you don't believe. :)

(well, if you have set a root password you might need it, I'm not sure about that as I've never tried, but on normal Ubuntu setup you definitely don't need a password)

cariboo
August 14th, 2009, 03:43 AM
If you have enabled the root account, you do need to enter a password when you drop to a root prompt.

Because of Ubuntu's security model, there really is no need to enable the root account.

rhcm123
August 14th, 2009, 04:40 AM
Infact, I could easily provide information to get his original password in a matter of seconds using a md5hash exploit in the /etc/shadow.

Can't you be banned for this?

go_beep_yourself
August 16th, 2009, 06:11 AM
Can't you be banned for this?

No, because whatever you do to your own computer is perfectly legal. Guns do not kill people. Men do. In other words, what you do with the information determines whether or not you get yourself into trouble.

go_beep_yourself
August 16th, 2009, 06:12 AM
If you have enabled the root account, you do need to enter a password when you drop to a root prompt.

Because of Ubuntu's security model, there really is no need to enable the root account.

You are very right. I enabled the root account. Something kept privelege dropping which would cause errors, but I can at any time remove the root account and therefor brute force attempts would do no or little good without a known user.

oboedad55
August 16th, 2009, 06:30 AM
No, you don't need a password to boot into single user root shell. Try it if you don't believe. :)

(well, if you have set a root password you might need it, I'm not sure about that as I've never tried, but on normal Ubuntu setup you definitely don't need a password)

What's your grub line look for recovery mode? I use grub from another installation and edit menu.lst by hand.

Thanks!

mcduck
August 16th, 2009, 07:57 AM
What's your grub line look for recovery mode? I use grub from another installation and edit menu.lst by hand.

Thanks!

Same as normal boot, just add "single" to boot options. (and remove "quiet" and "splash").

oboedad55
August 16th, 2009, 08:41 AM
Same as normal boot, just add "single" to boot options. (and remove "quiet" and "splash").

Okay, thanks for the help. So I can just add this at boot time by changing the parameters I already have set. In other words I would remove "quiet" and "splash" and replace them with the word "single". Correct?

Cheers,

mcduck
August 16th, 2009, 09:12 AM
Okay, thanks for the help. So I can just add this at boot time by changing the parameters I already have set. In other words I would remove "quiet" and "splash" and replace them with the word "single". Correct?

Cheers,

Yes, setting the parameters directly from Grub works just fine if you don't want to have the recovery mode permanently in your Grub menu.

oboedad55
August 16th, 2009, 09:36 AM
Yes, setting the parameters directly from Grub works just fine if you don't want to have the recovery mode permanently in your Grub menu.

Thank you kindly!

colau
August 16th, 2009, 12:35 PM
Thread can be marked as SOLVED.