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View Full Version : What's You're Job and is it hard please describe?



heroidi
July 24th, 2009, 06:22 PM
I am having a hard time working for my Restaurant cutting fish and washing it and so started to hate it and working into late hours at nights so what's you're job and is it hard?

philcamlin
July 24th, 2009, 06:24 PM
umpiring baseball

yes its hard when you work with someone who is a bad base ump

:popcorn:

heroidi
July 24th, 2009, 06:33 PM
umpiring baseball

yes its hard when you work with someone who is a bad base ump

:popcorn:

don't hate the player hate the game:P

Swagman
July 24th, 2009, 06:35 PM
Hard is subjective.

eg: People keep getting into my workplace, being bloody idiots and generally prevent me from doing my job efficiently. This used to affect my pay but fortunately not anymore.

Do you think people would mind if I did the same to them in their workplace and cost them time & money ?

I'll take a "No" as a given then and ask why is it ok for them to do it to me ?

I'm a Trucker.. The Road is my workplace

Edit: bodhi.zazen - deleted a large white space in the original post, content otherwise unchanged.

beercz
July 24th, 2009, 06:58 PM
This is my job (http://lidd.net), and it can be hard sometimes, especially finding work! One has to keep trying though,

zoomy942
July 24th, 2009, 07:00 PM
here is my job :)

Research in Motion did a case study on me/Webb

http://na.blackberry.com/eng/newsroom/success/webblandscape.jsp

67GTA
July 24th, 2009, 07:25 PM
I run a milk delivery route to schools. It is back breaking and mentally challenging, but the pay is really good. I also don't work when school is out. I can't complain.

philcamlin
July 24th, 2009, 07:27 PM
don't hate the player hate the game:P
aha true i cant wait to get a real job im only 15 though

heroidi
July 24th, 2009, 07:34 PM
aha true i cant wait to get a real job im only 15 though

me too but i got a real job i think!

baseface
July 24th, 2009, 07:43 PM
i design and run computational clusters.
is it hard? no.
frustrating? at times.

Xzallion
July 24th, 2009, 07:50 PM
I'm a soldier in the U.S. Army. Its a hard job, but you go into it expecting that.

JohnFH
July 24th, 2009, 07:54 PM
I'm a software developer. Is it hard? The programming isn't, or at least I don't perceive it to be, but dealing with people is. Do I enjoy it? Generally speaking, I enjoy my profession. Do I want to move up the ladder? Nope, otherwise all that I've come to enjoy will be lost. If I could relive my education and choose a different career path, would I choose something else? Nope.

DownTown22
July 24th, 2009, 07:55 PM
I'm an exploration geologist with a large Canadian-based mining company.
I've done most of my work in northern Saskatchewan and parts of the Northwest Territories and Nunavut, but other people in the department have gotten to go to the Midwest USA, Australia, Africa, Finland, Peru, Russia and many other places.
At times it can be fairly tough - both physically and mentally - but the payoff is (not just speaking about the money here) is excellent.

amadeus266
July 24th, 2009, 08:02 PM
I have two roles at work... First role is that of a Woodwind Technician, I repair musical instruments. Second is Network Administrator, its my job to keep 2 servers, 15 workstations, 3 surveilance systems, 3 VPNs and 3 hardware firewalls running. I am proud to report a 98.5% uptime over 10 years!

As far as it being hard, the instrument repair part is the most challenging especially with all of the poor quality intruments flooding the market over the last 7 years or so. You can't make a turnip sing so to speak. The Administrative part is easy as long as my users don't start screwing around where they should be.

Cheesemill
July 24th, 2009, 08:54 PM
I do network administration, IT support, and SharePoint development for a UK charity.
Is it hard? I wouldn't say hard but SharePoint can be a right pain in the *** :)

I am slowly managing to switch more and more of our servers from Windows to Ubuntu though :KS

izizzle
July 24th, 2009, 09:13 PM
I'm only 15 and I don't have a job. I do, however, work very hard at school as I am planning to get into either Duke or MIT for college.

spupy
July 24th, 2009, 09:19 PM
I convert Coca-Cola and gummi bears into code - that is, I am a coder. Thankfully, I'm still a student, so the work is still easy and flexible. I like it most of the time. I'd say it is the best job for me right now - not so much work, so it won't interfere with my studies; good pay (for a student, that is); I do stuff relevant to my studies; I work for a big IT company (like, top 5 worldwide), so it will look kinda good on my resume (I guess?).

lisati
July 24th, 2009, 09:21 PM
Not in regular full-time employment, so I'd guess that my job description includes the requirement to keep Mrs Lisati happy, no matter what. This includes the need to hold a decent conversation with her while browsing the forums or concentrating on some video editing that someone has paid me to do. Multitasking isn't something that comes naturally to me (I've been "accused" of having a mild form of Asperger's Syndrome (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asperger_syndrome)) but we somehow manage.

irv
July 24th, 2009, 09:23 PM
I am retired, but I do obituaries for a local funeral home. The work is not hard, but it get me down when I have to do one for someone very young. The last one I did was a 13 year old girl who hung herself because see was being bullied on Facebook. This is so sad.

gn2
July 24th, 2009, 11:01 PM
I'm a railway signalman (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Signalman_(rail)), it's straightforward till some equipment fails or an incident happens, when it can get tricky.

heroidi
July 24th, 2009, 11:29 PM
I am retired, but I do obituaries for a local funeral home. The work is not hard, but it get me down when I have to do one for someone very young. The last one I did was a 13 year old girl who hung herself because see was being bullied on Facebook. This is so sad.

Working with dead people is the hardest thing and this story about this girl is the sadest i ever heared and i hate suecide i think it's a crime!
Now i don't think my work is hard but i still think it smells fishy.

wirepuller134
July 25th, 2009, 12:40 AM
retired from the Army. We develop equipment to automate food processing equipment, ammonia refrigeration systems, and just recently built some CCC systems for a few places. Not hard but can be frustrating depending on how old the equipment is we are trying to operate.

markharding557
July 25th, 2009, 12:48 AM
working with dead people is very easy they don't complain.
i work in a crematorium
bit of a pain removing the ashes after though

Irihapeti
July 25th, 2009, 01:01 AM
I help people to change the way they think and feel about life, and therefore what they do with it. Some people call that therapy but I don't like that term (too much baggage attached to it).

Seeing someone let go of an idea that's been getting in their way - e.g. that they have to be totally perfect - and go on to enjoy life gives me a huge buzz. The frustrating bit is meeting people who just want to complain and not do anything else. Don't get me started on the ones who do that at social occasions.

gamerchick02
July 25th, 2009, 01:04 AM
I'm a mechanical engineer. Right now I'm unemployed and looking for work.

In my last job, I was responsible for the change management of a steering column. I worked with many different groups (purchasing, engineering, manufacturing and upper management) and suppliers.

I enjoyed it a lot, but the auto industry downturn affected me negatively.

Amy

zakany
July 25th, 2009, 01:24 AM
I'm a test facility manager for NASA. It's pretty easy.

Superkoop
July 25th, 2009, 01:45 AM
Presently I work as a farm hand for my father on a "truck farm." Meaning I plant, hoe, weed, harvest, spray, fix fences, random heavy lifting, handling customers, etc. We grow many many types of fruits and vegetables that can be grown in the Northern South Dakota area, which is quite a few.

We try to work only 4-5 hours a day because the work is in general quite intensive, so the hours are indeed quite nice!

Nevertheless, the work is hard manual labor, and often monotonous. Though growing things with your own hands is very rewarding! :D

However when school starts again, I'm back to hitting the books - and then I take Greek, not easy.

pat23_2007
July 25th, 2009, 01:48 AM
I'm a Linux System Administrator entry level, I work for Host Gator (http://hostgator.com). I just started about a week ago and am still going though training, seems pretty straight forward and easy to me.

cooper77z
July 25th, 2009, 01:58 AM
I am a substitute teacher, and yes it's really difficult, but it's really easy too, not to mention rewarding. I am pretty much on vacation whenever I want, and I choose my own hours, but I have to be there %100 for the kids when I accept an assignment.

I am also an entrepreneur, I am working on a multimedia company.

Grant A.
July 25th, 2009, 03:05 AM
I'm 16, but because of the recession, I can't find a job at all. :(


My current "job" is being a bum. I'm pretty damn good at it. Sometimes it's hard, though. Like the times you drop the remote, but you're too lazy to reach it. Urgh!!

Commisar Jimp
July 25th, 2009, 03:12 AM
I work for the USDA, not as a scientist or politician or anything cool, I just hoe weeds in the 87 degree heat all day. Its as hard as anything, but still better than my old job cleaning apartments.

JDShu
July 25th, 2009, 04:22 AM
Its awesome to know that theres such a huge range of professions on this forum. Reinforces the fact that linux is not just for people who work with computers.

As for me, I'm a fresh university grad and looking for work. Its hard being a bum, feels like crap.

Grant A.
July 25th, 2009, 04:30 AM
As for me, I'm a fresh university grad and looking for work. Its hard being a bum, feels like crap.

lol, punny.

cooper77z
July 25th, 2009, 08:53 AM
It's only in your mind, how much you bum or work for others at slave rates. It's really your choice what you do for money.

My first job was as a paper boy at age 12, I held the 2am route for 3 months without pay, then I collected and bought a radical bike, which was stolen, in the meantime I held another paper route for 2 years, finally I worked at fast food in high school.

I am not going to give you my whole resume.

kpkeerthi
July 25th, 2009, 09:18 AM
I'm a Project Leader (IT) with a leading asset management and securities services company. We build and maintain softwares that are used at the back office of the firm. I enjoy my job when I design and code but not much when I have to deal with the people.

geekygirl
July 25th, 2009, 12:04 PM
My trade is Aircraft Maintenance Engineer - Mechanical (called an A&P Mechanic in the US)

My current job is the MRH90 Maintenance Coordinator for Deeper Maintenance

Is it hard? not in my opinion but I have been an aircraft techo for over 18 years now :P

keplerspeed
July 25th, 2009, 12:33 PM
Currently studying mechanical/aerospace engineering at Uni, and working whenever I can during holidays. Im second year of a 4 year degree atm.

irv
July 25th, 2009, 01:22 PM
Before I retired, I worked many many jobs. My last employer was many because the company changed hands so many times. Thirty years ago when I first started working for them it was Gould Batteries (automotive line products). It had many other names for the past thirty years, and the last one being Federal Mogul Corp. (Manufacture of automotive products like pistons and liners). There main headquarters was in Michigan but I work in Minnesota.
I started out as a machinist and move into quality control. From there I went into a metals lab because back then I was knowledgeable in computers and they were looking for someone to computerise the lab. This was in the late 80's. From there I move into the R&D lab and then into the IT department where I took on the responsibilities of all the computers, networks and communications in the plant. My duties extended to other locations as time when on. Just before I retired I was working for the main office out of Michigan, but was traveling about the country helping other plants with computer problems.
Throughout the years I worked on everything from mainframes to desktops. From Novell servers to IBM RS6000's.
If I was young and just starting out in the workforce, I would pursue a job in communications. I would go back to school and take as many courses in Networking as I could. That is where the money is. I would work my way into being a Network Engineer and really master in that field. So all you young guys out here look in that direction if you want to advance yourself. Networking and communications is the way of the future.

treesurf
July 25th, 2009, 03:05 PM
I'm an arborist, meaning I work with trees. Everything from planting trees, to caring for sick trees, climbing and pruning trees, to cutting trees down. It can be hard and dangerous work, but can also be rewarding.

aikiwolfie
July 25th, 2009, 03:28 PM
I work in document imaging. Sometimes it's hard to get through the day. It's not exactly an inspiring job. Make a bundle of paper. Force it through a scanner. Repeat until the end of the day.

The hardest part though is tolerating the equipment. A Kodac i840 scanner connected to a Windows XP PC via SCSI. All controlled by an ageing and increasingly decrepit copy of Vignette IDM.

If Windows isn't crashing, it's Vignette. If it's not Vignette, it's the SCSI connection on the scanner. If it's none of those there's a network problem. Every single day there are hassles and issues with the equipment setup.

Then I come home. Boot up my own PC running Ubuntu and it all just works.

heroidi
July 25th, 2009, 06:47 PM
Wow now i see that ubuntu is not beeing used just from geeks and experimenting teenagers it's beeing used for fun and everything else just gotta say WOW!

jflaker
July 25th, 2009, 06:57 PM
I am having a hard time working for my Restaurant cutting fish and washing it and so started to hate it and working into late hours at nights so what's you're job and is it hard?

One thing that I learned early, is if you hate your job, this is your signal to move on.

May I suggest going back to school and become what you want or start your own business doing what you love........

heroidi
July 25th, 2009, 07:04 PM
One thing that I learned early, is if you hate your job, this is your signal to move on.

May I suggest going back to school and become what you want or start your own business doing what you love........

I work all the summer when school starts someone else works.

Nevon
July 25th, 2009, 07:05 PM
I'm currently unemployed. However, in about a month I'll be studying software engineering at Luleň University of Technology - and yes, it can be kind of hard to explain what software engineering is, to some people.

EDIT: Oh, I misread the thread title. I thought it said "Is it hard to describe", as in "is it hard to explain to people what you do". :P

JECHO
July 25th, 2009, 07:19 PM
I work for an ecommerce company called Volusion: http://www.volusion.com


It can be stressful but if you are familiar with technology I wouldn't really call it "hard".

toupeiro
July 25th, 2009, 07:35 PM
This is a cool thread. It's interesting to me to see linux being used by so many people with such diverse disciplines. In my case, my job fits the general stereotype of who uses linux, but I don't care. :-P

I am primarily a UNIX/Linux and enterprise storage admin for an oil company. I've been in IT, supporting oil companies for pretty much my whole career with an exception of two years where I worked for a large California based Federal Credit Union as a Network Administrator/Systems Administrator. I still do windows support, and some network administration but not to the extents I've done so in the past.

My job can at times be difficult, but thats really on me because I choose to take on a lot. Truthfully, I think I have one of the best jobs in the world. I absolutely love what I do, and I look forward to doing it every day. One of the things I love about my job is that it always stays fresh. We have to stay up with more cutting edge technologies and develop ways to implement them.

When the metal work gets too difficult, there is always cable to pull, always servers to rack and unrack, always something to be upgraded, built, decommissioned, moved, cleaned up, boxed, unboxed or what have you. So I can always break free and do something a little more physical. I get to travel to different places, and work with different teams across the US and sometimes in different countries. I haven't actually gotten to travel to any countries on business yet, but I know its probably in the cards down the line, and thats very exciting for me. I've worked with them by meeting in central meeting locations, or over the phone/intranet. I also think that I work with some of the coolest, and sharpest IT folks I've ever known, whom are mostly as motivated as I am to be doing what we're doing. It's a real treat for me.

heroidi
July 25th, 2009, 08:02 PM
Well i forget to mention my other let's call them "jobs" Free Software Activist now i'm in the steering group for planning a free software conference here in Kosova.
And regional LUG leader those 2 last are not jobs but are thinks i love to waste my time with.
@toupeiro thanks.

Cowchip7
July 25th, 2009, 08:11 PM
I am an attorney and focus my practice on insurance defense work (motor vehicle accidents, slip and falls, etc.). I love the work but the billable hour requirement makes it horrible! I should switch to Plaintiff's work!

koshatnik
July 25th, 2009, 08:23 PM
Some really interesting jobs on here.

I'm a photog. Run a project to help out of work young people get back into college or work, via photography, journalism and media work. I also do freelance photog commissions, mainly bands and portraiture. Is it hard? Yeah. All the time, but its also alot of fun.

heroidi
July 25th, 2009, 08:31 PM
Some really interesting jobs on here.

I'm a photog. Run a project to help out of work young people get back into college or work, via photography, journalism and media work. I also do freelance photog commissions, mainly bands and portraiture. Is it hard? Yeah. All the time, but its also alot of fun.

This is very interesting

BugenhagenXIII
July 25th, 2009, 08:52 PM
I work at Toad's Place (http://www.toadsplace.com). I work the coat check in the winter and security/rock shop/ticket booth/whatever during the summer. Not terribly difficult, but I have to deal with drunks on a regular basis and if there's not a lot of shows my hours are are almost non-existant. On the plus side, I get to see shows for free.

bigtoe6
July 26th, 2009, 06:51 AM
master press operator here. heidelberg sheetfed and gallus flexo web. it was hard starting out, but now i watch the apprentices do the work!:cool:

Tulya
July 26th, 2009, 11:40 AM
I am a mechanic/driver for a local bus company.

The job is much easier now physically than it was when I started, with the advent of power tools. I well remember struggling with seized nuts and bolts, also rivets that had to be chiseled off by hand. The change to air suspension means no more heavy lifting of cumbersome leaf springs.

It's just as dirty though.

KegHead
July 26th, 2009, 01:24 PM
retired 15 years early.

it's hard to fill in my days.

KegHead

icarid_17
August 2nd, 2009, 09:19 PM
Although I'm currently unemployed, I used to work for the local independent computer store called The Technology Boutique, however Staples moved in and we couldn't compete financially, so the store closed. As for the difficulty, well, lets just say that every day I came across someone with a computer that was broken in some way that I had never seen before, which meant more learning for me :). Then again I'm only seventeen, think I was 15 then. I hope to be able to work at another local computer store (who seriously undercuts staples' computer repair rates, though The Technology Boutique did too)when school starts

ftabor
August 2nd, 2009, 11:33 PM
I'm retired and have a hard time figuring out how I found time to work. Yard, garden, cooking and grandchildren keep me way too busy.

dragos240
August 2nd, 2009, 11:35 PM
My job is being a student. But I am on vacation. YAY!

irv
August 3rd, 2009, 12:58 AM
I'm retired and have a hard time figuring out how I found time to work. Yard, garden, cooking and grandchildren keep me way too busy.
I will amen that brother!

venator260
August 3rd, 2009, 01:11 AM
I also find it interesting to see the wide range of careers present on this board. Much less computer oriented than I had assumed it would be.

As for me, I am looking for work as a Social Studies teacher, and am currently working with the Student Conservation Association (http://www.thesca.org/) as a commuting crew leader. I lead kids on work projects in parks and greenways in the city of Pittsburgh, as well as plan environmental educational trips and lessons. It's about 2/3 trail work and 1/3 education. Basically, I would do this if I wasn't getting paid, so collecting decent money from it is great. The only thing that bothers me about this job is that the program ends in 2 weeks.

Jackelope
August 3rd, 2009, 03:36 AM
Youth Minister and Systems Admin here.

Hard? The first one can be, but its a lotta fun. The second is easy. People think I'm some kind of genius because I can fix their computers....the power goes to my head =)

Mateo
August 3rd, 2009, 03:50 AM
my job is that of a data analyst.

oh, and i'm also asked to write enterprise-quality applications in my spare moments and to do so as the sole developer, and on unrealistic deadlines and not being paid for it.

and i just recently got a pay cut in the form of mandatory unpaid vacation. but i'm not bitter.

fennec_fox
August 5th, 2009, 12:36 AM
I make powerpoint presentations for executives in a fortune 500 company. They get shown all over the world.

I suppose it takes a certain degree of designing and understanding but, no it's not hard. It's so easy it's painful and I can barely make it through a day without falling asleep from boredom. My yearly pay is less than 1/2 of 1% of those who I make these presentations for.......which really is pretty good pay so I keep doing it.

If you enjoy making presentations and talking enthusiastically in front of people all the time you might want to try to get a job in marketing. Not sure how the job market is for that right now.

jordanp123
August 5th, 2009, 02:28 AM
Electrical Engineer
I make sure that Circuit designs have adequate safety margins; and that the installations that the designs are used for are for the correct Division (Hazardourous locations). I like it pretty good, some days are pretty bad, but I guess what job doesnt have days like that ?

nmccrina
August 5th, 2009, 02:50 AM
I'm a soldier in the U.S. Army. Its a hard job, but you go into it expecting that.

ARMY NATIONAL GUARD! Once a month is not too bad ;)

Plus I love my MOS - 13D, artillery. I get to do lots of trigonometry and map stuff, it's fun.

blueshogun
August 5th, 2009, 03:08 AM
I too am in the food service industry, using my income to pay for a CSC degree. It's not hard, but incredibly annoying when people come in expecting to get free food, willing to say anything was wrong just to get out of paying. Had to quit being the manager cause I was always on the verge of cussing someone out for it.

I don't care what I do once I get my degree so long as it's in front of a computer, preferably not one running Windoze. 8 classes to go!

alienclone
August 5th, 2009, 03:58 AM
Automotive Locksmith

I drive around town and unlock cars for AAA members who lock their keys in.
Physically it is easy, mentally frustrating at times when traffic is crazy or when the AAA dispatchers mess up the info they send to us.

era86
August 5th, 2009, 04:14 AM
Web Developer... I get paid to do what I love!

BUT... it is difficult. ;)

Cowchip7
August 22nd, 2009, 07:33 PM
I work at Toad's Place (http://www.toadsplace.com). I work the coat check in the winter and security/rock shop/ticket booth/whatever during the summer. Not terribly difficult, but I have to deal with drunks on a regular basis and if there's not a lot of shows my hours are are almost non-existant. On the plus side, I get to see shows for free.

Nice! I am originally from Connecticut. I saw Howie Day play there.

instantkarma
August 22nd, 2009, 09:00 PM
I try to convince people not to cancel their subscriptions. I work at a newspaper customer service dept.

Is it hard? Slightly, because you have to talk people into doing something they in advance had no or little intention of doing. It's basically a sales position and it's done over the phone.

The true hardship though, is actually coming to and being at work. I really dont care about the company nor do I especially believe in the product. It doesn't help that I'm in a ground level windowless office and in front of a screen most of the time. I guess I hate my job :).

markbuntu
August 24th, 2009, 01:34 AM
I am currently a high end finish carpenter. We do all the fancy expensive woodowork in rich people's houses. It is fun and very rewarding work. Very relaxed low pressure environment, good pay, and a steady 40 hr work week.
I used to be an EE but got tired of the relentless pressure and endless overtime.

dragos240
August 24th, 2009, 01:35 AM
I do have a job, it's hard, I am a student.

privatejarhead
August 24th, 2009, 01:55 AM
full time job: high school student. is it hard? not the work, but the people at my school can be....difficult to deal with (lol...)


sometimes do yardwork for people (ie mowing mostly, leaf bagging, whatever is required). also, im to go-to guy when windows give my family and friends the usual freezing, network problems, bsod, ..............

schauerlich
August 24th, 2009, 02:37 AM
I do have a job, it's hard, I am a student.

No you don't, and no it's not.

RabbitWho
August 24th, 2009, 02:43 AM
I'm a Teacher.

I teach English As a Forigne Language.

It's easy to explain, but not to explain how I still can't spell foreign.

Being a student is only hard if you do it wrong, or your teachers do it wrong, or the whole school system is doing it wrong.. so yes being a student is hard.

running_rabbit07
August 24th, 2009, 03:11 AM
Thirty years ago when I first started working for them it was Gould Batteries (automotive line products). .

That's crazy, My dad worked for Gould Batteries.

I am currently an unemployed, full time student that is practically a jack of all trades. I have done roofing, landscaping, office assistant, Vinyl siding production, Certified Honda mechanic, helicopter repair, heavy armor crewman on an M1A1 heavy armor tank, parts delivery, production of fire sprinkler systems, shop manager, husband of a MILF, and last but definitely not least, father of an awesome 5 year old that starts school tomorrow.

I am going to school full time for a Engineering Degree in Networking and Internetworking.

nubimax
August 24th, 2009, 03:18 AM
Before retirement 20 years commercial fishermen North Pacific area, then 15 years fixing small boats and motors up to 45 feet. Now feed the humming birds and grow fruits and vegetables in the garden.
M

RiceMonster
August 24th, 2009, 03:21 AM
I'm doing a student, but I'm doing a (paid) work term at a bank working with mainframes. It's hard if you're unfamiliar with Z/OS and related technologies, but once you get past that, my responsibilities are not very hard. However, next week is my last week there and I go to another company starting in September (also a bank, but different responsibilities; working with Linux servers and other things).


No you don't, and no it's not.

lol

mamamia88
August 24th, 2009, 03:45 AM
i bag groceries 15 hours a week and take 5 classes at local college and no it's not very difficult just mind numbing and your feet hurt from standing all day

sandyd
August 24th, 2009, 04:20 AM
working (on the job training COOP actually) for a computer service company. sorra get fustrated when i ahve to deal with computer illietrates over the phone. feel like doing ](*,) sometimes.

running_rabbit07
August 24th, 2009, 04:24 AM
working (on the job training COOP actually) for a computer service company. sorra get fustrated when i ahve to deal with computer illietrates over the phone. feel like doing ](*,) sometimes.

I get that feeling when talking to friends about there systems sometimes.

macogw
August 24th, 2009, 04:26 AM
I'm a test engineer. Hard...eh. Challenging? Yes, I have to learn all sorts of new tools. Frustrating: Yes! Growing pains since I'm the first to try test automation here and so the infrastructure doesn't get built til I request it.

running_rabbit07
August 24th, 2009, 07:45 PM
Hard is subjective.

eg: People keep getting into my workplace, being bloody idiots and generally prevent me from doing my job efficiently. This used to affect my pay but fortunately not anymore.

Do you think people would mind if I did the same to them in their workplace and cost them time & money ?

I'll take a "No" as a given then and ask why is it ok for them to do it to me ?

I'm a Trucker.. The Road is my workplace

Edit: bodhi.zazen - deleted a large white space in the original post, content otherwise unchanged.

Do you use any mapping programs for oversized loads on Linux? I'm not sure which program my brother uses but he has GPS hooked up to his laptop and it lets them know if they need to take detours for height or weight issues. He hauls 90+ ton transformers.

lykwydchykyn
August 24th, 2009, 08:15 PM
I do general IT support for a county government. It's probably the easiest job I've ever had in terms of day-to-day activity. It has its annoyances and stresses, but most of the time the work is light and enjoyable.

Before this I was a non-famous recording artist. Now that's a hard job.

kg4tah
August 24th, 2009, 09:22 PM
I am a Police Officer / Detective. I have been doing this for 13 years now and yes it it tough at times and boring at times :-)

murderslastcrow
August 24th, 2009, 10:37 PM
Multimedia Design, primarily with 3d models for films and games. There are a lot of stupid people to work with, who don't understand the idea that there are certain limits for their own game engines, sooooo... it can get frustrating at times when you get asked to do the near-impossible and have to charge them more for it, when they could've just done the logical choice.

Other than that, it's really fun, and feels great to create really nice 3d sculptures, as I call them. :3 It's something I can live with, certainly.

lethalfang
August 24th, 2009, 10:57 PM
I'm a graduate student in theoretical biophysics. I make up models (not physical models, but scientific models), and do calculations based on those models. I use MATLAB to do a bunch of my calculations.
It's challenging, but can be rewarding at times.

alfredjoaquin
February 13th, 2010, 07:02 AM
I am working as a software engineer and it is not so tough but spending more time on system is quite hard to do.

Lyndon99
April 14th, 2010, 10:13 AM
I am working as a locksmith so I don't have more work that to late night works.If it is time to work more...

ronnielsen1
April 14th, 2010, 11:02 AM
Its awesome to know that theres such a huge range of professions on this forum. Reinforces the fact that linux is not just for people who work with computers.

Well, I thought just about everyone here had computer jobs. I guess not. I'm an electrician. 15 years.

Swagman
April 14th, 2010, 11:12 AM
Do you use any mapping programs for oversized loads on Linux? I'm not sure which program my brother uses but he has GPS hooked up to his laptop and it lets them know if they need to take detours for height or weight issues. He hauls 90+ ton transformers.

Sorry, never saw your question to me until the bump.

I used to pull 15'10" tautliners and had to choose my routes VERY carefully.

I used Philips Navigator Maps (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Philips-Navigator-Truckers-Britain-Atlases/dp/1849070385) as they are considerably superior to ordinary maps, even having farm names on them. (I used to deliver fertiliser).

alket
April 14th, 2010, 11:39 AM
I don't have a job. That is really hard.

sandyd
April 14th, 2010, 02:11 PM
I work as an IT manager/IT professional for my company, and as a connunications technician for its sister company. one of the most fustrating thing is to deal with the workers/people who screwed up their computer, because its usually screwed up due to something that they did...

Endomancer
April 14th, 2010, 02:50 PM
I'm currently unemployed, but in the last 10yrs I've worked in many areas of the construction industry. From landscaping/landscape maintenance to construction site/road works traffic control and civil construction labouring.

The work is demanding in many ways depending on my roll, but is good in the fact that from day to day that roll can change drastically which means I rarely get bored

urosg3
April 14th, 2010, 02:57 PM
Ex journalist, now working as media manager in political party here in Belgrade. Its nice, comfort job, easy and interesting.

Pozdrav babaroga (greetings babaroga)

pommie
April 14th, 2010, 03:13 PM
Reverse role household, wife works and I am a full time carer for my special needs daughter, is it hard yes, are the hours long, 24/7, 52 weeks of the year, so yeah :KS also she is totally incontinent so you might say the job is a bit, well, on the nose :^o

But when she climbs on my lap and says "luv daddy" Priceless \\:D/

Cheers David

Luke has no name
April 14th, 2010, 04:15 PM
I'm about to graduate with an MIS degree, I have a job as a network engineer lined up at a company in south Texas. It's going to rock! I can't wait to pay off the debt.

I've also worked as a lifeguard, parking employee (write tickets to people parked in the wrong lots), snow cone vendor, and mechanic.

I, too, am surprised at how few people here make their living on computers. Then again, we're in the Cafe, not in he server mailing lists.

koshatnik
April 14th, 2010, 04:17 PM
Reverse role household, wife works and I am a full time carer for my special needs daughter, is it hard yes, are the hours long, 24/7, 52 weeks of the year, so yeah :KS also she is totally incontinent so you might say the job is a bit, well, on the nose :^o

But when she climbs on my lap and says "luv daddy" Priceless \\:D/

Cheers David

Man, thats the toughest job of all. Hats off to you.

buddyd16
April 14th, 2010, 04:25 PM
I am a structural engineer, basically I take what an architect draws and make sure it won't fall down. The job can be mentally demanding.

Whenever I begin to think my job is tough though I remember it is probably 2 to 3 times more difficult for the workers who actually have to build what I draw. Though some of them can be difficult to deal with.

whiskeylover
April 14th, 2010, 04:29 PM
IT professional.

Do I like my job? Sort of. But I'm at a point where I'm feeling burnt out and would like to move on to project management, partly because I want leadership roles, and partly because it should also pay more, and I like money. Lets see how that goes.

Lightstar
April 14th, 2010, 09:24 PM
I work at a big store, merchandising. Making sure things are on the sales floor, prices are right, products are where they are supposed to be.

Bad salary,
Easy work,
Not rewarding at all.

I'm getting older and still don't know where I belong. But the "profession" part of my life is the only thing that needs a change, everything else is perfect and I'm happy.

Doctor Mike
April 14th, 2010, 09:32 PM
Yes my job is hard. Cleaning, Flood and restoration. I own the business, but that means I must work harder than anyone else (personal management method). Does keep my toes attached to my feet though.

Chronon
April 15th, 2010, 12:33 AM
Its awesome to know that theres such a huge range of professions on this forum. Reinforces the fact that linux is not just for people who work with computers.

As for me, I'm a fresh university grad and looking for work. Its hard being a bum, feels like crap.

I am in the same boat.

sandyd
April 15th, 2010, 12:51 AM
and heres a good question. why do most IT professionals have difficulties dealing w/ customers?

toupeiro
April 15th, 2010, 12:58 AM
and heres a good question. why do most IT professionals have difficulties dealing w/ customers?

Some IT people may be highly technically tuned, but they aren't necessarily versed enough to interpret problems, or relay answers, from/to people who are not as technically tuned as they are, or technically tuned at all.

To me, it's important to be able to relate a technical situation which might be above someones head, in a way that it makes sense and is applicable, even if its just a circumstantial relevance. An example of what I mean can be a snippet of a conversation I had with my mom last night regarding her wanting a new laptop. She asked me, "Is 4GB a lot?" And I explaned that 4GB is an amount. Just asking is 4GB enough isn't enough information. I then related it to something she knew, like cooking. I said its like me asking if 3 cups was enough. You need to know 3 cups of what, right? So, now when she sees a number like that, she's going to know its a quantity/amount, and it helps her ask the right questions to people when she wants information.

I think I do OK with customers, and I think they think I do ok. Where my shortcomings fall are primary in soft skills and public speaking, which I get challenged in my job more and more on. I'm really good and comfortable in one on one, or maybe smaller groups, like 5 one one scenarios, but where I tend to get stretched is in forum style presentations. Thankfully, I dont do them all the time.

bellaporter21
April 15th, 2010, 01:13 AM
I basically work on computers all day long and it can be tiring at times! Cause I work ten hours a day!!

abstractcoder
April 15th, 2010, 02:19 AM
I'm an Electrician. It's not that hard, mostly problem solving, it can be hard if you don't think things through before doing your work. The environment is nice, the guys are pretty cool for the most part.

oldsoundguy
April 15th, 2010, 03:11 AM
I am a retired audio engineer (live sound systems).

Guess you could say that it was hard because of the hours, the traveling, the physicality of setting up, running and taking down sound systems .. and some of the dork producers and venue managers we had to deal with, but SINCE IT WAS FUN and a challenge sometimes, didn't seem that way.

If what you do is fun to do .. it is NOT hard to do!

toupeiro
April 15th, 2010, 03:27 AM
.

If what you do is fun to do .. it is NOT hard to do!

^^^^ I agree with this wholeheartedly!

jaco223
April 15th, 2010, 03:38 AM
I was doing work as an amateur astronomer, which wasn't hard as it is one of my passions. I'm now working as a drug counselor, being a recovering addict myself, I'm trying to give back what I learned in recovery. This work is difficult, but the rewards of it far out weigh the gravity of addiction.

Jaco

Screwdriver0815
April 15th, 2010, 03:53 AM
I am an automotive engineer.

after the study I worked at Ford in Cologne for 2 years, but the times got harder, so I switched over to an automotive contracters company, who works for all the big players.

For this company I was at Saab in Sweden for 1 and a half year, after that I worked for Opel and Mercedes Benz.

Now I am in the US, working for BMW. Doing some testing, getting mileage on the test cars, reporting issues, emissions... all that stuff. The job lasts for 3 years and after that, maybe we win the contract again. Then I will stay, or I'll stay anyway.

The job right now is not that hard. It was hard, at Opel and Merc. To be honest, it was hell on earth.
But at Ford and Saab I had my best times yet. And I am really glad for the Saab guys that they seem to be saved right now. Hopefully this will last.

cmat
April 15th, 2010, 04:02 AM
I design software for scientific research now. Used to work for an architectural firm. Hard, since no one else will touch the tasks I'm designated. Very rewarding though.

bwhite82
April 15th, 2010, 05:41 AM
Utility worker here (natural gas). I turn on and off gas meters, check for leaks etc. Very easy work in comparison to other jobs I have held.

sigurnjak
April 15th, 2010, 06:03 AM
I have been offset press operator for last 18 years . Currently operating Ryobi 3302 and whole bunch of other shop machinery .
It is a good job when you get to hold beautiful finished product in your hands . It is close to home so i get to ride my bicycle March to October to work .

Khakilang
April 15th, 2010, 06:05 AM
I am jobless and that is the hardest thing to do.

the yawner
April 15th, 2010, 06:19 AM
I'm a network magician. I'm responsible for maintaining the flow of the 1's and 0's through various spells, tapping of various artifacts, dealings with epic level network sorcerers and their well-meaning but decidedly incompetent apprentices or whatever you'd call them help desk staff.

lais
April 15th, 2010, 06:23 AM
i don't have any job. i am an engineering student.

elliotn
April 15th, 2010, 08:53 AM
10111 emergency consultant,

its hard, no. The stinky children keep giving hell and ofcoz the lazy cops who wont do their jobs and the stinky complainants who thinks their the only ones who needs help. Or think they fly jets to get in their home, hard no my job is easy but when this people calls and say 'your ma se....' yeah it aint hard but stressing

ElSlunko
April 15th, 2010, 10:24 AM
I'm a freelance photographer. It's hard because I'm responsible for many things. Oh and getting good shots! Can't forget that :). I'm looking for part time work to help with bills because I can't pay my bills with photography alone.

Paqman
April 15th, 2010, 10:53 AM
I'm an engineer for a train operating company. I sit in the control room and try to deal with trains that break down in service. I have a network of mobile technicians scattered around the countryside, so most of my work is just done over the phone, and the poor lads have to go attend broken trains in all weather and fix them, while I sit in a comfy chair in an air conditioned office. So my job is a doddle really.

I used to be an armourer in the air force though, that was a bit more hands on. Work on the flight line could be pretty hard when we were pushing out a lot of sorties.

m4tic
April 15th, 2010, 10:53 AM
i'm an mechanical engineering student, its hard when you do not have the passion though

koshatnik
April 15th, 2010, 11:06 AM
I'm a freelance photographer. It's hard because I'm responsible for many things. Oh and getting good shots! Can't forget that :). I'm looking for part time work to help with bills because I can't pay my bills with photography alone.

I tried freelancing full time, and gave up. It doesnt pay bills without working 90 hour weeks and you'll be burnt out in no time doing that chasing clients.

I work full time now, and freelance as extra. Its the only way to do it really. The only other way to freelance is to work for an agency, and thats a huge grind. Plus you get sent to crappy places to photograph crappy subjects for some one else. Did that too, its horrible.

So yeah, get a full time job doing something else, and make up your money freelancing with photography. As the photography picks up scale back the work appropriately. No way now would I ever freelance full time. Life's too short.

ElSlunko
April 15th, 2010, 07:10 PM
I tried freelancing full time, and gave up. It doesnt pay bills without working 90 hour weeks and you'll be burnt out in no time doing that chasing clients.

I work full time now, and freelance as extra. Its the only way to do it really. The only other way to freelance is to work for an agency, and thats a huge grind. Plus you get sent to crappy places to photograph crappy subjects for some one else. Did that too, its horrible.

So yeah, get a full time job doing something else, and make up your money freelancing with photography. As the photography picks up scale back the work appropriately. No way now would I ever freelance full time. Life's too short.


I totally agree. The change in technology has made it difficult that it seems like no one wants to pay for work. Sometimes I get the feeling that people think they're doing ME a favor by "letting" me shoot them or their event.

I do have the advantage of living in Los Angeles, however. So I do hope that portraits & weddings/quinceneras will bring me into full time. It's close! But not quite there yet.

With that said, koshatnik can back me up in saying that yes, it's hard. Rewarding however.

sharathpaps
April 15th, 2010, 09:16 PM
I'm a doctor..An Anaesthetist (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anesthesiologist) in training to be precise. I put people to sleep before surgeries and make sure they don't feel any pain during surgery and after I wake them up. I'm also an Intensivist in training - ie. I take care of people who are critically ill and who need extensive specialised care for recovery.

Is it hard? It is not hard labour but it IS mentally exhaustive because I have a very small margin for error. But I love my work and wouldn't trade it for anything in the world. Still have 2 years and 4 months of training to complete though :)

HermanAB
April 15th, 2010, 11:18 PM
Sshhh... I can tell you, but then I would have to shoot you...

Firestem4
April 16th, 2010, 06:29 AM
Currently I'm an I.T. Operations Technician for a small company. I help maintain and support desktops and I provide backup network and server troubleshooting assistance when the main I.T. Manager is busy. (Lucky me that tends to be all the time. My I.T. manager is also the companies General Manager).

In 1 more week I will be a PC tech for a very large hospital who supports at a single location close to 700 desktops and over 50 servers running Windows XP, SLED, and SLES.

Physically I.T. work, especially at 'peon' status can be physically and mentally demanding. Dealing with customers or employees can be difficult, especially when you're trying to diagnose issues they're experiencing.

It's rewarding to me because I'm passionate about technology and I love my work. The new position also affords me the chance to get into Network Analysis, a step in the right direction for my career.


and heres a good question. why do most IT professionals have difficulties dealing w/ customers?

Because we're computer people, not people people :).

Being receptive and communicative is not the easiest trait for Technical Professionals, especially when you have to 'dumb yourself down' to be able to communicate with a non-technical user.

I'm *Very* expressive and I tend to be over-zealous when I communicate with other people. My difficulty is that I go on and on when the end-user just doesn't care or even need to know. (I've been working on that).