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View Full Version : Netbooks continue to get cheaper



monsterstack
June 30th, 2009, 08:09 AM
According to this article (http://broadcast.oreilly.com/2009/06/low-end-linux-netbook-prices-c.html) [oreilly.com], any way. $170, $150, $139. The prices are tumbling, and the outlook is that they will get cheaper still as time goes on.
It almost goes without saying that you won't find anything that runs Windows at anywhere near these prices.Quite.

Paqman
June 30th, 2009, 08:12 AM
Bring it on!

You've got to wonder if the smartphone and netbook markets are going to collide in a couple of years though. They've already got similar functionality. Hell, Google even seem to be angling Android toward the netbook market, so they might even be running the same software stack.

ghindo
June 30th, 2009, 08:12 AM
Still waiting for ARM netbooks to catch on. The Tegra platform especially looks intriguing.

Paqman
June 30th, 2009, 08:15 AM
Still waiting for ARM netbooks to catch on.

Until Adobe sort out Flash for ARM, it ain't going to happen.

Phreaker
June 30th, 2009, 08:17 AM
We hate Adobe :p

monsterstack
June 30th, 2009, 08:18 AM
Bring it on!

You've got to wonder if the smartphone and netbook markets are going to collide in a couple of years though. They've already got similar functionality. Hell, Google even seem to be angling Android toward the netbook market, so they might even be running the same software stack.

I wonder this, as well. On one level, I think it's a bad idea to try and push netbooks as somehow being a competitor to smartphones. On netbooks, I much prefer a bog-standard Linux desktop to any of the netbook versions I've seen so far. Microsoft would like people to think about netbooks as not really being proper desktop replacements, but then that's only because Windows runs like turd on netbooks, and they cannot afford to compete with them. I used an eeePC for six months with Ubuntu installed, and it ran like a charm. Having some sort of odd-looking smartphone-ish interface would really put me off. But I suppose we'll have to wait and see what the market thinks about it!

monsterstack
June 30th, 2009, 08:21 AM
Until Adobe sort out Flash for ARM, it ain't going to happen.

Flash is not that much of a dealbreaker for me, but I can see how others might have use for it. Luckily for them Adobe are going to support ARM architectures (http://www.adobe.com/aboutadobe/pressroom/pressreleases/200811/111708ARMAdobeFlash.html) [adobe.com]:


Adobe Systems Incorporated (Nasdaq:ADBE) and ARM [(LSE:ARM); (Nasdaq:ARMH)] today announced a technology collaboration to optimize and enable Adobe® Flash® Player 10 and Adobe AIR™ for ARM Powered® devices, ranging from mobile phones to set-top boxes, mobile Internet devices, televisions, automotive platforms, personal media players and other mobile computing devices. The collaboration is expected to accelerate mobile graphics and video capabilities on ARM platforms to bring rich Internet applications and Web services to mobile devices and consumer electronics worldwide.

SunnyRabbiera
June 30th, 2009, 08:25 AM
They are only chaper now till win 7 comes out, with some companies like Asus being Microsoft loving idiots their Netbooks look cheap now but soon people would want to play with their OS, and Win7 with its starter edition being restrictive there would be more money porued in to other versions of Win7

monsterstack
June 30th, 2009, 08:34 AM
They are only chaper now till win 7 comes out, with some companies like Asus being Microsoft loving idiots their Netbooks look cheap now but soon people would want to play with their OS, and Win7 with its starter edition being restrictive there would be more money porued in to other versions of Win7

I can't really make sense of that sentence, but I get the gist of what you're trying to say, and I agree with you. Starter Edition really is just Microsoft farting in the faces of their customers. They aren't offering any benefits to netbook users at all. Consider the fact that not even the Starter Edition will even run on many of the new netbooks coming out and you see the problem they have. I suspect we'll be seeing more underhanded tactics to try and marginalise Linux netbooks, such as the deal with nVidia (how they managed to say anything good about Windows CE with a straight face is beyond me), the "It's better with Windows!" campaign, and hardware vendors mysteriously pulling their Linux prototypes from going into mass production at the last minute. C'est la vie. Still, I don't think even all that will be enough to crush netbooks. Shame on them for trying.

Paqman
June 30th, 2009, 08:42 AM
Starter Edition really is just Microsoft farting in the faces of their customers. They aren't offering any benefits to netbook users at all.

That's not really true. Win7 is objectively a better OS than the other Windows netbook offering (XP), even if you only look at security.

Tbh, I wouldn't be surprised if the limited number of simultaneous apps wasn't a biggy for most people. Even on my relatively powerful desktop i'm normally only running about 3 apps.

Personally i'd always use Linux on a netbook, but Win7 will probably do really well IMO.

monsterstack
June 30th, 2009, 08:57 AM
That's not really true. Win7 is objectively a better OS than the other Windows netbook offering (XP), even if you only look at security.

Tbh, I wouldn't be surprised if the limited number of simultaneous apps wasn't a biggy for most people. Even on my relatively powerful desktop i'm normally only running about 3 apps.

Personally i'd always use Linux on a netbook, but Win7 will probably do really well IMO.

Well all right, it isn't completely void of value, but here are some things to think about:


price;
performance on lower-end hardware;
performance on SSDs;
availability on ARM architectures.


Windows 7 consummately fails in all of these areas. Factor in the overhead of running an antivirus application, a firewall, scanning for spyware every so often, and defragging. I have no doubt that Windows 7 will be competitive on netbooks priced $200 and up, but any suggestion that they can even begin to compete with the really cheap netbooks is laughable. It just isn't possible unless they're prepared to operate at a loss. Now think about the fact that the relative performance of a sub-$150 netbook running a stripped down Linux will be comparable or even better than a machine worth well over $200 running Windows 7. All of a sudden, the thought that Linux might become popular isn't so far fetched as people might first think.

afeasfaerw23231233
June 30th, 2009, 09:01 AM
Last week I just installed Windoze XP for my uncle's netbook. He refused to try gOS which was already installed on it.

Paqman
June 30th, 2009, 09:07 AM
Windows 7 consummately fails in all of these areas.


Except SSDs. Vista and XP are rubbish on SSDs, but Win7 has been designed for them.

I'd agree about your other points though. Having said that, I still think it'll do well. The market for Windows is pretty stubborn. That's not surprising, considering some of the poor distros that have been getting shipped on netbooks. Hopefully more OEMs are going to pick up UNR and run with it, as the likes of Linpus and Xandros seem to really struggle to compete against Windows.

monsterstack
June 30th, 2009, 09:14 AM
Except SSDs. Vista and XP are rubbish on SSDs, but Win7 has been designed for them.

I'd agree about your other points though. Having said that, I still think it'll do well. The market for Windows is pretty stubborn. That's not surprising, considering some of the poor distros that have been getting shipped on netbooks. Hopefully more OEMs are going to pick up UNR and run with it, as the likes of Linpus and Xandros seem to really struggle to compete against Windows.

I didn't know Windows 7 works okay on SSDs, cool. And I agree that the choices OEMs have made regarding Linux OSes have been terrible. They've almost universally gone for those pathetic Microsoft-ish distros that are filled with non-free components and pro-versions for which the user has to pay. Ugh. I think the founder of Red Hat said it best:

Robert Young said [source: sombrio.com (http://sombrio.com/2009/06/25/revenge-of-the-nerds/)]
You can’t compete with a monopoly by playing the game by the monopolist’s rules. The monopoly has the resources, the distribution channels, the R&D resources; in short, they just have too many strengths. You compete with a monopoly by changing the rules of the game into a set that favors your strengths.

Wise words.

Sublime Porte
June 30th, 2009, 10:17 AM
Until Adobe sort out Flash for ARM, it ain't going to happen.

ARM netbooks are already on their way. Do you really think they'd halt production until one single little piece of software was ready for it? Flash might be the be all and end all for you, but not for everyone, and it certainly wouldn't prevent such devices going into production.

MellonCollie
June 30th, 2009, 10:29 AM
Tbh, I wouldn't be surprised if the limited number of simultaneous apps wasn't a biggy for most people.

It won't be a big deal for anyone seeing as Microsoft dropped the 3-app 'feature'. :) You can run as many applications as you wish in the Starter edition.

Paqman
June 30th, 2009, 11:04 AM
ARM netbooks are already on their way. Do you really think they'd halt production until one single little piece of software was ready for it? Flash might be the be all and end all for you, but not for everyone, and it certainly wouldn't prevent such devices going into production.

Nobody said it would necessarily stop them going into production, but Flash is definitely big enough for it to be a serious barrier to ARM adoption. If I was an OEM looking at producing ARM machines i'd be doing everything I could to help Adobe get Flash ported asap.

zmjjmz
June 30th, 2009, 12:11 PM
Last week I just installed Windows XP for my uncle's netbook. He refused to try gOS which was already installed on it.
Can't blame him, gOS sucked.


Also, you don't need to defrag an SSD. Just part of the way it works.