PDA

View Full Version : [ubuntu] Why Is Everything So Big?



EmperorNero
May 29th, 2009, 04:55 AM
Here's my big scrape with ubuntu. All the other aspects work great, or I can figure out how to fix them over time.
But this is annoying: Everything is huge.
I already decreased font and icon sizes, but it's like ubuntu only puts half as much on the screen as windows.
And I'm on the same resolution.
Buttons in programs are so huge, it feels like I'm using some special PC for seniors.

I did some searching, and I can barely find this addressed. And I didn't find a solution.
Any idea?

Thanks.

Ms_Angel_D
May 29th, 2009, 04:56 AM
Can you include a screenshot? Also what resolution are you using?

EmperorNero
May 29th, 2009, 05:02 AM
Can you include a screenshot? Also what resolution are you using?

The resolution is 1280x800. The same as on windows.

EmperorNero
May 29th, 2009, 05:09 AM
Here is a screenshot of how big the buttons in most programs look.

freeman2000
May 29th, 2009, 05:10 AM
I can make a screenshot, of what?


Your screen! Show us how things are oversized.


Do you have Assistive Technologies turned on? Universal access? Orca Screen Reader & Magnifier? If so, turn it off.

shazbut
May 29th, 2009, 05:15 AM
Go to system -> prefs -> appearance -> fonts -> details
Lower the DPI. I usually do this since my eyesight is good enough and I can cram more onto the screen.

EmperorNero
May 29th, 2009, 06:30 AM
Your screen! Show us how things are oversized.

I did post a screenshot. See above.


Do you have Assistive Technologies turned on? Universal access? Orca Screen Reader & Magnifier? If so, turn it off.

I never heard of any of those, and would not know how to turn them off. Unless they are installed with Ubuntu, I don't have them.


Go to system -> prefs -> appearance -> fonts -> details
Lower the DPI. I usually do this since my eyesight is good enough and I can cram more onto the screen.

Yes, that does effect font sizes. Which is helpful, but not really what causes the trouble.
I want all the buttons and images to not be as huge.

Keithhed
May 29th, 2009, 06:32 AM
looks normal to me...

QIII
May 29th, 2009, 06:36 AM
Is every application unacceptably large, or just that one?

Are there options to change the sizes of the elements of the interface?

EmperorNero
May 29th, 2009, 06:42 AM
looks normal to me...

It's probably normal, but is Ubuntu really supposed to be that way?
I can't imagine why it would have huge buttons like for seniors and children. ;)


Is every application unacceptably large, or just that one?

Are there options to change the sizes of the elements of the interface?

All applications are like that. Even the Desktop icons before I reduced their size.
If there are options to change that, I have not found them, and that's what my thread was about.
Certainly this is not something that only applies to that application, it's in all of ubuntu and kubuntu.

QIII
May 29th, 2009, 06:43 AM
What is your screen resolution?

... Sorry ... went back and read the thread. Found it.

rizman
May 29th, 2009, 06:46 AM
Did you just recently switch from Windows to Ubutunu? Because I did (about 2 weeks ago) and I had the same impression. I though that I was unable to get as much on the screen as under windows. But, there is one thing you must consider: By default, windows has only 1 panel (Taskbar with Start etc...) at the bottom, whereas ubuntu has one at the top and one at the bottom. So by default, you have less screen space left for your applications. Hence the impression that everything is bigger.

What I did was remove the top panel, installed Gnome-Do with Docky for quick applications access. I left the bottom panel and made it a little bit like in windows (left-most the "Start-Button", then the list of open windows etc...) I don't want to copy windows, but I'm used to that so why not recreate it with ubuntu. That's the thing that's so fantastic with Linux. You can change your desktop to suite your needs. It's not you who must adapt to the desktop :-)

QIII
May 29th, 2009, 06:51 AM
Did you just recently switch from Windows to Ubutunu? Because I did (about 2 weeks ago) and I had the same impression. I though that I was unable to get as much on the screen as under windows. But, there is one thing you must consider: By default, windows has only 1 panel (Taskbar with Start etc...) at the bottom, whereas ubuntu has one at the top and one at the bottom. So by default, you have less screen space left for your applications. Hence the impression that everything is bigger.

What I did was remove the top panel, installed Gnome-Do with Docky for quick applications access. I left the bottom panel and made it a little bit like in windows (left-most the "Start-Button", then the list of open windows etc...) I don't want to copy windows, but I'm used to that so why not recreate it with ubuntu. That's the thing that's so fantastic with Linux. You can change your desktop to suite your needs. It's not you who must adapt to the desktop :-)

I don't find that to be true, even on a single desktop. If I set my screen resolution to the max native resolution for my monitor (24" WS), I can get a whole lot on it.

Even on my other machine with a 19" screen, I get all the detail I want.

SunnyRabbiera
May 29th, 2009, 06:52 AM
The icons look fine to me, and I have a lower resolution then you do

EmperorNero
May 29th, 2009, 06:53 AM
That's the thing that's so fantastic with Linux. You can change your desktop to suite your needs. It's not you who must adapt to the desktop :-)

Yes, I just recently switched from windows. I will edit those bars, but those few pixels didn't make that much of a difference.
It's that the linux versions of programs that I used on windows, like OpenOffice for some reason have few giant buttons. (I will post a comparison screen in a minute.)
It looks like some childrens version.
I really don't understand that. I thought Linux is the hip, productive thing as opposed to windows.

And the screen resolution is 1280x800, the same as I had on windows.

SunnyRabbiera
May 29th, 2009, 06:59 AM
I would not say "some childerens version here"
Heck if anything that looks like it was designed for kids its XP with its luna theme.

rizman
May 29th, 2009, 06:59 AM
I don't find that to be true, even on a single desktop. If I set my screen resolution to the max native resolution for my monitor (24" WS), I can get a whole lot on it.

Even on my other machine with a 19" screen, I get all the detail I want.

Well, it was just a personal impression I got when I switched. Of course, others might not have been under that impression. Now that I'm used to it, I can get as much on my 17'' Laptop display as before.


Heck if anything that looks like it was designed for kids its XP with its luna theme.

That is soooo true :-)

Viva
May 29th, 2009, 07:06 AM
Try a different gtk theme. I think its more to do with the space between the elements rather than the size itself. Or install gnome-color-chooser, open it from system->preferences and choose Compact layout in the profiles menu at the bottom.

Didius Falco
May 29th, 2009, 07:14 AM
For Desktop icons, open Nautilus, go to Edit, Preferences, Views. Adjust the Icon View Defaults to suit.

For even more granular control of icon size:

http://mynbook.wordpress.com/2008/03/05/debian-etch-change-gnome-menu-icon-size/

For non-Gnome apps (Open Office, etc.) you'll need to look through their options.

Regards,

Didius

b@sh_n3rd
May 29th, 2009, 07:20 AM
Hi, I think this is some kind of bug..I've experienced it in two computer's. On one, a Dell OptiPlex GXa with an ATI 3D Rage Pro video adapter on an older ViewSonic E40 monitor, the resolution jumps to 800x600 and I can't change that setting to anything else as that is the only one available. Once I reboot, (sometimes 2 or three times) It returns back to normal, 1024x768 @ 60Hz. Now, on the system I'm typing right now, it happened to me some time ago, but seems to have vanished recently. The PC uses an Intel 82845G video adapter on a Samsung Magic SyncMaster CDP17S1(G) at a resolution of 1280x1024 @ 60Hz (I should be able to select 80Hz, but it's unavailable at this resolution on ubuntu).

My problem was basically a repeat of what happened on the other PC, but with a difference. My resolution was the same, 1280x1024 but the screen appeared larger, about one step lower in resolution. It's strange that I can't select a resolution between 1024x768 and 1280x768 on this PC, but it switches to this resolution with this problem. I started using this PC on Jaunty but used Intrepid on the Dell. At the time, it started with Intrepid after a blackout. This (http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1164999) is the thread I started on my problem with the Intel PC. This (http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1151414) one is on the Dell PC.

One thing is, on the Intel PC, I used a fix mentioned here (http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1130582) and tried the latest kernel releases. The 2.6.29-11-generic (latest stable release), and the 2.6.30rc's..(2.6.30rc7 now). one or two of these kernels had this prob, some didn't...I had a bug with the rc7 so now I'm using the default, 2.6.28, available with Jaunty. The strangest thing is, among swapping kernels, this problem seems to have disappeared on my Intel PC. And, I haven't really noticed it on the 2.6.28 after switching back about two days ago.

While typing the above, I thought what if you try a newer kenel? 2.6.29-11-generic is what I'd recommend as you are a beginner. What's your video adapter and what are the resolutions you can choose on your PC?

EmperorNero
May 29th, 2009, 07:38 AM
So Linux is just "bigger"?

Aearenda
May 29th, 2009, 07:58 AM
On Windows, the dots per inch setting is pretty primitive. The higher the screen resolution, the smaller things appear. As I understand it on Linux, X-Windows computes the dpi from the resolution AND the physical size of the screen, as reported by the monitor. Things should stay the same size, but get progressively smoother, as the screen resolution increases. A4 paper at 100% in OpenOffice should match the actual paper size, no matter the actual resolution in use.

Sometimes the monitor reports the physical size wrongly, and this can lead to strangely sized displays. It might be necessary to override the DPI as sensed by X-Windows (not just for fonts in GNOME) to fix this. I'll find a how-to and edit this post with a link.

GNOME tries to keep the interface uncluttered, and tends to look 'bigger' than Windows does by default. Once you get used to the lack of clutter, Windows looks ridiculously small sometimes. As others have suggested, different themes might help.


EDIT: It turns out the thread I had in mind only works for the login screen, sorry! However, Viva's suggestion of installing gnome-color-chooser with the 'compact' profile works for me, and I'm glad of it since I use a netbook!

Don't forget Firefox has an excellent zoom feature, and its own font settings. You can also override its dpi setting, in about:config look for layout.css.dpi and make it smaller to get more in. The -1 default says "use the system setting".

EmperorNero
May 29th, 2009, 08:08 AM
Sometimes the monitor reports the physical size wrongly, and this can lead to strangely sized displays. It might be necessary to override the DPI as sensed by X-Windows (not just for fonts in GNOME) to fix this. I'll find a how-to and edit this post with a link.

I would appreciate that how-to. I searched the heck out of this and can't find any more than a few forum threads that pretty much say the same as my OP. No ways to fix it.
I thought that this would destroy ubuntu for me, as I really can't get over only fitting half the content than I'm used to in a firefox window.
I'm not too eager to turn my laptop into a palm pc. ;)

kulight
May 29th, 2009, 08:19 AM
i had the same impression as you did but i found a solution at gnome look.
try using this theme and see if things get to a better size
http://www.gnome-look.org/content/show.php/Murrina+Crystal?content=96065

EmperorNero
May 29th, 2009, 08:57 AM
i had the same impression as you did but i found a solution at gnome look.
try using this theme and see if things get to a better size
http://www.gnome-look.org/content/show.php/Murrina+Crystal?content=96065

I can't figure out what to download, where to click? Sorry.

Edit: I think I installed it, but I see no difference. What does it do?

Viva
May 29th, 2009, 09:16 AM
Have you tried the gnome-color-chooser yet?

EmperorNero
May 29th, 2009, 09:25 AM
Have you tried the gnome-color-chooser yet?

I'm working on it, but I'm not knowledgeable enough to do what it takes to install the thing.

HavocXphere
May 29th, 2009, 09:56 AM
I experience a similar issue a while back. I fixed my issues by installing the correct driver, but it would appear that you've already got a driver installed.


So Linux is just "bigger"?
Not really. Or rather maybe a *little* bit, but what your describing sounds like extra big on top of the normal linux-just-a-little-bit-bigger.

Along the lines of Aearenda's thinking:
Rur xrandr in a console screen. You should see something like this:

Screen 0: minimum 320 x 200, current 1680 x 1050, maximum 1680 x 1680
DFP1 disconnected (normal left inverted right x axis y axis)
DFP2 connected 1680x1050+0+0 (normal left inverted right x axis y axis) 433mm x 271mm
1680x1050 59.9*+
1400x1050 60.0
1280x1024 75.0 60.0

On my screen that physical measurement is the physical size of my screen. I suspect that it won't be the correct size on yours. And therefore gnome screws everything because your physical screen is bigger than it thinks.

Not quite sure how to fix it, but I think this is the relevant xrandr switch:

--dpi dpi
This also sets the reported physical size values of the screen, it uses the specified DPI value to compute an appropriate physi-
cal size using whatever pixel size will be set.

Keep in mind that I've not tried messing with these settings...mainly because I don't want to break my working setup.:wink:

Aearenda
May 29th, 2009, 12:00 PM
You can install gnome-color-chooser by starting synaptic package manager from the system->administration menu, and then searching for it; or by starting a terminal from applications->accessories and pasting the following command in to it:
sudo apt-get install gnome-color-chooserBoth ways will ask for your password.

EDIT: I tried messing with the dpi settings using xrandr, as HavocXphere suggested - but it made no difference, other than to the reported value from xdpyinfo. Gnome-color-chooser, on the other hand, does make a difference with the compact profile.

blueridgedog
May 29th, 2009, 12:33 PM
When I switched to Ubuntu I had the same feeling. At the same resolution, the screen seemed less efficient. I reduced the size of the panels and dropped the icon size down a good bit. I also installed a compact theme in firefox. More importantly, I guess I just adjusted to the philosophical difference and now I find a windows system has sort of smallish elements. The end result for me was to not confuse what I was used to with what worked.

Viva
May 29th, 2009, 01:28 PM
I'm working on it, but I'm not knowledgeable enough to do what it takes to install the thing.

You don't have to be knowledgabale enough. Just go to System->Administration->Synaptic Package manager and search for gnome-color-chooser. Install it and open it from system->preferences->Gnome Color Chooser.

EmperorNero
May 29th, 2009, 07:52 PM
You don't have to be knowledgabale enough. Just go to System->Administration->Synaptic Package manager and search for gnome-color-chooser. Install it and open it from system->preferences->Gnome Color Chooser.

Yes, I now got gcc working and switched to compact theme.
All bars got tiny, but overall gnome still looks huge.
I might just have to get used to everything being huge, but I don't think I can that easily.

EmperorNero
May 29th, 2009, 08:30 PM
I experience a similar issue a while back. I fixed my issues by installing the correct driver, but it would appear that you've already got a driver installed.


Not really. Or rather maybe a *little* bit, but what your describing sounds like extra big on top of the normal linux-just-a-little-bit-bigger.

Along the lines of Aearenda's thinking:
Rur xrandr in a console screen. You should see something like this:

On my screen that physical measurement is the physical size of my screen. I suspect that it won't be the correct size on yours. And therefore gnome screws everything because your physical screen is bigger than it thinks.

Not quite sure how to fix it, but I think this is the relevant xrandr switch:

Keep in mind that I've not tried messing with these settings...mainly because I don't want to break my working setup.:wink:

That's the right direction to go. Now I need to know how to co correct it. That --dpi dpi command doesn't work.
xrandr shows and 331mm x 207mm, which as far as I can tell with my ruler, is about right (1280 x 800).
But in System>Preferences>Display it shows 15 inch screen, and I have a 15.4 inch screen. Might that have to do with it?

Keithhed
May 29th, 2009, 08:38 PM
Have you tried sitting further from the screen? that should make everything appear smaller lol

albinootje
May 29th, 2009, 08:41 PM
It's probably normal, but is Ubuntu really supposed to be that way?
I can't imagine why it would have huge buttons like for seniors and children. ;)


In Ubuntu you can actually stretch your desktop icons, and you can resize the panel(s). See attached screenshot.
Some colleagues of mine use the giant stretched icons all the time, it is a bit shocking to see at first, but also funny imho.

EmperorNero
May 29th, 2009, 08:52 PM
Have you tried sitting further from the screen? that should make everything appear smaller lol

It's so easy!

ibuclaw
May 29th, 2009, 09:15 PM
IMO, the size of the buttons look fine ...

I wouldn't want them any smaller else I wouldn't be able to see what they were. ;)

emeraldgirl08
May 29th, 2009, 09:37 PM
i had the same impression as you did but i found a solution at gnome look.
try using this theme and see if things get to a better size
http://www.gnome-look.org/content/show.php/Murrina+Crystal?content=96065

Wow. I like that theme :)


I would appreciate that how-to. I searched the heck out of this and can't find any more than a few forum threads that pretty much say the same as my OP. No ways to fix it.
I thought that this would destroy ubuntu for me, as I really can't get over only fitting half the content than I'm used to in a firefox window.
I'm not too eager to turn my laptop into a palm pc.

Emperor Nero it took time for me to adjust to Linux. I've found that this FREE OS is a community effort. It's a work we're all contributing toward. You may very well find a way to fix the appearance of your liking.

Just remember to share with us how you did it ;)

yoasif
May 29th, 2009, 09:58 PM
Use the human compact (http://martin.ankerl.com/2008/11/04/human-compact-themes-for-ubuntu-810/) theme.

and edit .gtkrc-2.0.mine

to include


gtk-icon-sizes = "panel-menu=16,16:panel=16,16:gtk-button=16,16:gtk-large-toolbar=16,16"

EmperorNero
May 29th, 2009, 10:24 PM
I made a screenshot of the same webpage in ubuntu and windows, both on 1280x800.
As you can see ubuntu (first) is much larger, I can only see to the menu item 'Unse Wine', while on windows I can see down to 'Beyond the Basics'.

http://ubuntuforums.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=115625&stc=1&d=1243632226

Viva
May 29th, 2009, 10:27 PM
Are you using the same fonts in both? I recommend "Liberation Sans' font(size 9), small and beautiful

EmperorNero
May 29th, 2009, 10:34 PM
Are you using the same fonts in both? I recommend "Liberation Sans' font(size 9), small and beautiful

Do you mean in Preferences>Appearence?
Turning fonts smaller in Ubuntu doesn't effect the font in firefox.

Viva
May 29th, 2009, 10:42 PM
Do you mean in Preferences>Appearence?
Turning fonts smaller in Ubuntu doesn't effect the font in firefox.

Yes, preferences and appearance. I can notice the changes in firefox too.

Aearenda
May 29th, 2009, 10:54 PM
Did you look at the font and dpi settings in Firefox as I suggested earlier?

Don't forget Firefox has an excellent zoom feature, and its own font settings. You can also override its dpi setting, in about:config look for layout.css.dpi and make it smaller to get more in. The -1 default says "use the system setting".

Viva
May 29th, 2009, 10:58 PM
Did you look at the font and dpi settings in Firefox as I suggested earlier?

You can also change the setting using the "NoSquint" extension for firefox

yoasif
May 29th, 2009, 11:04 PM
I made a screenshot of the same webpage in ubuntu and windows, both on 1280x800.
As you can see ubuntu (first) is much larger, I can only see to the menu item 'Unse Wine', while on windows I can see down to 'Beyond the Basics'.It looks like you don't have courier installed on Ubuntu -- the page is being rendered differently because you are using different fonts.

You can play with the font settings in Firefox to make the fonts smaller -- I like going with Size: 14, and I use the Dejavu fonts (use synaptic/aptitude to install them if you like).

EmperorNero
May 29th, 2009, 11:32 PM
Yes, preferences and appearance. I can notice the changes in firefox too.

Yes, I did. Thanks.


Did you look at the font and dpi settings in Firefox as I suggested earlier?

That option does not change a thing as far as I can tell. :confused:


You can also change the setting using the "NoSquint" extension for firefox

I'm checking it out right now.


It looks like you don't have courier installed on Ubuntu -- the page is being rendered differently because you are using different fonts.

I noticed that firefox uses another font than in windows.
I installed times new roman and set firefox to use it. Now I have as much on the screen as on windows. (Minus the extra bar.)

I think now with fonts in ubuntu, fonts in firefox and icons cnaged to be smaller, the only thing that is too big for my taste are all the program buttons.
But that would be an individual preference for each program.



Any idea why linux versions of the same programs have fewer, bigger buttons than the windows versions?

EmperorNero
May 29th, 2009, 11:44 PM
i had the same impression as you did but i found a solution at gnome look.
try using this theme and see if things get to a better size
http://www.gnome-look.org/content/show.php/Murrina+Crystal?content=96065

As for that theme, it said 'Theme successfully installed', but I see no difference.
The theme of my system is still human.

Viva
May 29th, 2009, 11:47 PM
As for that theme, it said 'Theme successfully installed', but I see no difference.
The theme of my system is still human.

You have to click customize in the preferences window and Choose the theme in controls tab.

P.S You can learn a lot by messing around with themes. Offtopic, but have you tried desktop effects and emerald?

blueridgedog
May 29th, 2009, 11:54 PM
[QUOTE=EmperorNero;7368405]I made a screenshot of the same webpage in ubuntu and windows, both on 1280x800.
As you can see ubuntu (first) is much larger, I can only see to the menu item 'Unse Wine', while on windows I can see down to 'Beyond the Basics'.

Just press "ctrl and -" in firefox to set the size down. "ctrl and +" to enlarge (which you do not want to do based on your OP).

EmperorNero
May 29th, 2009, 11:57 PM
You have to click customize in the preferences window and Choose the theme in controls tab.

Hmm... yes. Now the theme turned blue. But it still doesn't look like this (http://www.gnome-look.org/CONTENT/content-pre3/96065-3.png).
What to do more?


P.S You can learn a lot by messing around with themes. Offtopic, but have you tried desktop effects and emerald?

Off-topic hints are appreciated.

Viva
May 29th, 2009, 11:59 PM
Hmm... yes. Now the theme turned blue. But it still doesn't look like this (http://www.gnome-look.org/CONTENT/content-pre3/96065-3.png).
What to do more?



Off-topic hints are appreciated.

Did you choose the correct theme? Part of the reason that screenshot looks awesome is the titlebar and icon themes.

EmperorNero
May 30th, 2009, 12:05 AM
Did you choose the correct theme?
I don't know. I picked this one.
I don't know the difference between a theme and a titlebar or icon theme:

http://ubuntuforums.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=115641&stc=1&d=1243638249


Part of the reason that screenshot looks awesome is the titlebar and icon themes.
I cant seem to choose any other icon theme:

http://ubuntuforums.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=115639&stc=1&d=1243638136

ibuclaw
May 30th, 2009, 12:06 AM
I made a screenshot of the same webpage in ubuntu and windows, both on 1280x800.
As you can see ubuntu (first) is much larger, I can only see to the menu item 'Unse Wine', while on windows I can see down to 'Beyond the Basics'.



See the first screenshot for referencing the setting of font sizes in Ubuntu. (Right-Click on the Desktop and select "Change Background", then click on the "Font" tab).


See the second screenshot for referencing the setting of font sizes in Firefox (they are different, which is odd, tbh). Go into "Edit->Preferences" in Firefox and under the "Content" tab, select "Advanced" in Fonts & Colours.

Regards
Iain

ibuclaw
May 30th, 2009, 12:13 AM
I don't know. I picked this one.
I don't know the difference between a theme and a titlebar or icon theme:

I cant seem to choose any other icon theme:



Theme = Overall package (colours, icons, titlebars, panels, etc, etc).
Titlebar = Style of the titlebar (the colour of the titlebar is defined in the theme).
Icon = style of icons for GUI objects.


Regards
Iain

Viva
May 30th, 2009, 12:13 AM
I don't know. I picked this one.
I don't know the difference between a theme and a titlebar or icon theme:

I cant seem to choose any other icon theme:



The title bar theme can be changed using the 'Window Border' tab in that window(or emerald theme manager if you're running emerald which you're not). I'm not sure about the icons, you should be able to choose, if you can't download another icon theme from gnome-look.org.

EmperorNero
May 30th, 2009, 12:16 AM
Theme = Overall package (colours, icons, titlebars, panels, etc, etc).
Titlebar = Style of the titlebar (the colour of the titlebar is defined in the theme).
Icon = style of icons for GUI objects.

Thanks. So from my second screenshot, you can see that there is no option to choose icons that look like this (http://www.gnome-look.org/CONTENT/content-pre3/96065-3.png).
I downloaded this: http://www.gnome-look.org/content/show.php/Murrina+Crystal?content=96065
So should there be a icon them included in that? How do I turn it on?

Viva
May 30th, 2009, 12:19 AM
Thanks. So from my second screenshot, you can see that there is no option to choose icons that look like this (http://www.gnome-look.org/CONTENT/content-pre3/96065-3.png).
I downloaded this: http://www.gnome-look.org/content/show.php/Murrina+Crystal?content=96065
So should there be a icon them included in that? How do I turn it on?

I don't think an icon theme is included in that theme. It is just a GTK theme(defines controls and buttons). Download another icon theme from here (http://gnome-look.org/index.php?xcontentmode=121), install it like you did with this this theme and choose it from the icons tab.

EmperorNero
May 30th, 2009, 04:24 AM
I figured out the smaller theme and fonts.
And I changed the font in firefox, as mentioned earlier.
I changed all I can, but some things are still too big, and I would have to change them individually.

Here's what I mean.
Above, you see a screen from OpenOffice Writer in Ubuntu. Below is it in Windows.
For some reason the same program has bigger buttons in Ubuntu. This is the case for almost everything in the OS.
Everything's bigger for some reason.

http://ubuntuforums.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=115667&stc=1&d=1243653747

albinootje
May 30th, 2009, 04:37 AM
KDE (Think : Kubuntu) has even bigger icons : http://www.kde.org/screenshots
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f1/Kubuntu_jaunty.png/800px-Kubuntu_jaunty.png

EmperorNero
May 30th, 2009, 04:50 AM
KDE (Think : Kubuntu) has even bigger icons : http://www.kde.org/screenshots
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f1/Kubuntu_jaunty.png/800px-Kubuntu_jaunty.png

Yeah, that's why I didn't like Kubuntu, despite it being quite fancy looking.
So making things bigger is on purpose in Linux, eh? How come?
Is it a 'make it easier for old ladies' thing?
I am in the open source mood, but that doesn't work for me. :(

Are there distros that don't go that way?

albinootje
May 30th, 2009, 05:32 AM
So making things bigger is on purpose in Linux, eh? How come?

In the new KDE 4.x several icons are bigger. I don't know why.


Are there distros that don't go that way?
I think you should look at themes, icons, fonts, flexibility, and the resolution of your screen.
You can of course also try other desktop environments and windowmanagers.
Maybe you'll like OpenBox in CrunchBang Linux more.
http://crunchbanglinux.org/wiki/_media/screenshots/crunchbang-linux-clean-desktop-8.10.01.png?cache=cache
http://crunchbanglinux.org/

Kubuntu has different icons for (inside) OpenOffice than Ubuntu has, so I assume it is possible that you use a smaller set of icons.
But eyecandy is usually the last thing I want to talk about, so ... good luck! :-)

ibuclaw
May 30th, 2009, 10:16 AM
Yeah, that's why I didn't like Kubuntu, despite it being quite fancy looking.
So making things bigger is on purpose in Linux, eh? How come?
Is it a 'make it easier for old ladies' thing?
I am in the open source mood, but that doesn't work for me. :(

Are there distros that don't go that way?

Actually, it looks like it's a standard size to me. Just having a look in my icon folder, they all come from the 24x24 directory.

I suppose if you are picky, you could make a copy of the theme and resize all images in the 24x24 directory to, say, 22x22 or less. Although, I wouldn't say that there is anything wrong with their size already (I had to squint to see the windows icons that you made a comparison of ;)), but, at the end of the day, different people have different preferences.

Attached is a 24x24 icon (the back button) which shows you comparison to its size compared to firefox (they are both the same).

Regards
Iain

EmperorNero
May 30th, 2009, 10:58 AM
tinivole, I am not sure whether you are referring to the icons of files and folders in ubuntu or the button icons of applications.
It is mostly the latter that I am annoyed by the size of.

Now I have to decide whether to switch to linux or stay with windows.
Upon close comparison, ubuntu does look more "cool" than windows.
I could get over the buttons for seniors to use ubuntu, but at the moment I'm pretty discouraged with the switch. :(

Poyntz
May 30th, 2009, 11:04 AM
Here's my big scrape with ubuntu. All the other aspects work great, or I can figure out how to fix them over time.
But this is annoying: Everything is huge.
I already decreased font and icon sizes, but it's like ubuntu only puts half as much on the screen as windows.
And I'm on the same resolution.
Buttons in programs are so huge, it feels like I'm using some special PC for seniors.

I did some searching, and I can barely find this addressed. And I didn't find a solution.
Any idea?

Thanks.

Sorry if this has already been answered but this sounds like a resolution problem. Go to System -> Preferences -> Display in the Ubuntu menu. Next to Resolutions:, select one of the higher values. I for example use 1280 x 800 (but if you have a very old computer, probably better to not go so high). Still, 1280 x 800 should run fine on most computers

EmperorNero
May 30th, 2009, 11:14 AM
Sorry if this has already been answered but this sounds like a resolution problem. Go to System -> Preferences -> Display in the Ubuntu menu. Next to Resolutions:, select one of the higher values. I for example use 1280 x 800 (but if you have a very old computer, probably better to not go so high). Still, 1280 x 800 should run fine on most computers

Thanks, but that is not it. The resolution was automatically detected after installing to be 1280 x 800, the same as in windows.

QIII
May 30th, 2009, 11:36 AM
EmperorNero --

I think you posted a couple of screenshots that have explained exactly what you are seeing. And no, I don't think that what you are seeing is normal for Ubuntu. All the more frustrating, since we haven't seemed to come up with a good explanation . . .

I wouldn't give up on Ubuntu, but I wouldn't say you shouldn't try other distros. It's a free world when you get away from Windoze, so you should pick what works best for you.

I just hate to see you disappointed with something that works very well for me.

I'd post a few screenshots myself, but it would just show exactly what I've said before. I don't see the same differences in the sizes when I go back and forth between windows and Ubuntu in my dual boot.

Although I can't for the life of me figure out why your installation would have been any different than anyone else's, it seems as though some setting is different for you.

I've been puttering around with everything I can find affecting appearance, and I'll be darned if I can find anything.

I hate to see you give up on Ubuntu. I've found it to be a great product and I like the community.

Aearenda
May 30th, 2009, 11:50 AM
The OpenOffice screenshot looks like you have large icons selected in the OpenOffice preferences - go to tools->options then choose view, and set 'icon size and style' to small. Also note that you can scale the whole interface down in there too.

QIII
May 30th, 2009, 11:54 AM
I just found this . . .

It may be a rehash, but it might be worth a try. In your case, maybe you want to go down a notch or two.

System → Preferences → Appearance → Fonts → Details..

I wonder if the size of your fonts makes the application windows "appear" larger.

I just went through and adjusted mine.

I've attached a couple of screenshots.

QIII
May 30th, 2009, 12:02 PM
The OpenOffice screenshot looks like you have large icons selected in the OpenOffice preferences - go to tools->options then choose view, and set 'icon size and style' to small. Also note that you can scale the whole interface down in there too.

Very good.

Emperor's first screenshot was Texmaker.

I'm using Synaptic to install that right now to see if it has similar adjustments.

I hope what he is running in to is just that sort of thing.

Viva
May 30th, 2009, 12:04 PM
The OpenOffice screenshot looks like you have large icons selected in the OpenOffice preferences - go to tools->options then choose view, and set 'icon size and style' to small. Also note that you can scale the whole interface down in there too.

Excellent. Works great.

EmperorNero
May 30th, 2009, 12:10 PM
The OpenOffice screenshot looks like you have large icons selected in the OpenOffice preferences - go to tools->options then choose view, and set 'icon size and style' to small. Also note that you can scale the whole interface down in there too.

Yeah, that did it for OpenOffice. Nice.


EmperorNero --

I think you posted a couple of screenshots that have explained exactly what you are seeing. And no, I don't think that what you are seeing is normal for Ubuntu. All the more frustrating, since we haven't seemed to come up with a good explanation . . .

I wouldn't give up on Ubuntu, but I wouldn't say you shouldn't try other distros. It's a free world when you get away from Windoze, so you should pick what works best for you.

I just hate to see you disappointed with something that works very well for me.

I'd post a few screenshots myself, but it would just show exactly what I've said before. I don't see the same differences in the sizes when I go back and forth between windows and Ubuntu in my dual boot.

Although I can't for the life of me figure out why your installation would have been any different than anyone else's, it seems as though some setting is different for you.

I've been puttering around with everything I can find affecting appearance, and I'll be darned if I can find anything.

I hate to see you give up on Ubuntu. I've found it to be a great product and I like the community.

Thank you for being concerned, I promise I will not give up so fast. I must say, I do like Ubuntu. Just the intuitive look and feel of it. And I have experienced the community to be just great! (I read somewhere that Linux expert users supposedly are angry nazis, yelling at every mention of a dislike of Linux. But that is not the case at all.)
There are some features that I miss though. For example, I just want to drag a launcher to the desktop to create a shortcut. There are a few things that are like that, complicated for no reason.
Also I miss the control, I have no idea where installed programs go. If I wanted to back up some preferences, where to find the files? Under windows I knew where they were, and what to delete after uninstalling.

If there is some way to figure out if there is an issue on my machine, I would appreciate it. I think all screenshots in this thread were posted by me. Could you show me how it looks different on your machine? Some posters said, this large is just how Linus is.

QIII
May 30th, 2009, 12:14 PM
Emperor --

I installed Texmaker on my machine.

I have monster screen, so I scaled my screenshot here to fit the scale of yours. In the Options section, I selected font size 11, and I get a very similar view to yours. (Screenshot attached).

Do you use Texmaker in Windows?

Aearenda
May 30th, 2009, 12:16 PM
Right-click on any program icon in the main menu, you can create a launcher on the panel or desktop from there. You can drag and drop from the places menu.

Preferences are generally kept in hidden files in your home folder. On Linux, hidden files always have a name starting with a '.' - you can see them from nautilus if you turn on 'show hidden files' in the view menu.

On GNOME many programs use the GConf instead - it's like the Windows registry. Press ALT and F2 then type gconf-editor and press Enter to get into a regedit-like editor. But don't fiddle with things without reading the descriptions - they usually take effect immediately!

Actually on Linux you have MORE control once you are over the learning curve - see yoasif's post (http://ubuntuforums.org/showpost.php?p=7368268&postcount=39) above for an example.

Viva
May 30th, 2009, 12:17 PM
Yeah, that dod it for OpenOffice. Nice.



Thank you for being concerned, I promise I will not give up so fast. I must say, I do like Ubuntu. Just the intuitive look and feel of it. And I have experienced the community to be just great! (I read somewhere that Linux expert users supposedly are angry nazis, yelling at every mention of a dislike of Linux. But that is not the case at all.)
There are some features that I miss though. For example, I just want to drag a launcher to the desktop to create a shortcut. There are a few things that are like that, complicated for no reason.
Also I miss the control, I have no idea where installed programs go. If I wanted to back up some preferences, where to find the files? Under windows I knew where they were, and what to delete after uninstalling.

If there is some way to figure out if there is an issue on my machine, I would appreciate it. I think all screenshots in this thread were posted by me. Could you show me how it looks different on your machine? Some posters said, this large is just how Linus is.

Dragging a launcher to the desktop works for me.

Look at the screenshot thread to see how ubuntu looks on different machines with customizations.
http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1144440

QIII
May 30th, 2009, 12:24 PM
Yeah, that dod it for OpenOffice. Nice.



Thank you for being concerned, I promise I will not give up so fast. I must say, I do like Ubuntu. Just the intuitive look and feel of it. And I have experienced the community to be just great! (I read somewhere that Linux expert users supposedly are angry nazis, yelling at every mention of a dislike of Linux. But that is not the case at all.)
There are some features that I miss though. For example, I just want to drag a launcher to the desktop to create a shortcut. There are a few things that are like that, complicated for no reason.
Also I miss the control, I have no idea where installed programs go. If I wanted to back up some preferences, where to find the files? Under windows I knew where they were, and what to delete after uninstalling.

If there is some way to figure out if there is an issue on my machine, I would appreciate it. I think all screenshots in this thread were posted by me. Could you show me how it looks different on your machine? Some posters said, this large is just how Linus is.

Part of the thing, I think, is not that Linux is any harder, just that it is different than the Windows world we all grew up in. If we all had to suddenly switch from MSDOS to Windows 7, we'd all probably be cussing, too.

We all grew up with Windows as it grew, and so we learned incrementally. You didn't have to think about learning English, but you might find it difficult to learn to speak German. But Germans seem to pick it up pretty easily . . .

It's a new environment for you. Different, but sensible to those of us who have been using it for a while. I've been using Ubuntu since Warty, and Unix long before that.

Just a new language is all.

SunnyRabbiera
May 30th, 2009, 12:27 PM
Icon size seems to be the main issue here, one can get more compact icons if one knows how.
For icon size adjustment KDE does have it, initially icons can be a little big but can be adjusted.
Gnome can be played around with too.
One cannot just show off one screenshot and say thats the issue,
Your first screenshot looks fine, but your openoffice screen shot does show off that the Ubuntu version has slightly bigger icons.
But this might be more of an issue with the openoffice icon set, it doesnt use the same set of icons as the full system, it might look like it but one can easily see the difference between the two with enough experience.
Sadly there are not too many icon themes made for open office, it usually usues crystal or human, or tango as those icons have been ported to openoffice by those who work on those icon sets.
The default Ubuntu icon set can be compacted though, I have seen it done.

EmperorNero
May 30th, 2009, 12:38 PM
I installed Texmaker on my machine.

I have monster screen, so I scaled my screenshot here to fit the scale of yours. In the Options section, I selected font size 11, and I get a very similar view to yours. (Screenshot attached).

It seems the size is the same. You can see that if you quickly go fourth and back between the two screenshots.
So then that's just how Linux is?


Do you use Texmaker in Windows?

Not yet, but I could install it for comparing.

QIII
May 30th, 2009, 12:43 PM
I don't think that's the way Ubuntu is.

I think it may be the way Texmaker is . . .

I'm not sure if there is a Windows version of Texmaker. That would be an interesting experiment if you could install it.

It might be that what you are seeing is really a function of what open source developers are doing.

I'm going to go back through the thread, but did you post screenshots of a difference between OpenOffice in Windows and Ubuntu?

QIII
May 30th, 2009, 12:47 PM
I took a quick look back through the thread and I did notice #40.

Did anyone suggest the difference might be the text size settings in the browser. Assuming you are using Firefox, that might be worth a whirl...

If you haven't tried it.

Sorry if I'm going over stuff already discussed. This is a long thread!

EmperorNero
May 30th, 2009, 01:04 PM
Thanks for all responses, I did find your comments helpful.


Right-click on any program icon in the main menu, you can create a launcher on the panel or desktop from there.

Right you are. Good I mentioned it. Now I know.


Actually on Linux you have MORE control once you are over the learning curve

That sounds great. And I actually had that assumption about Linux.

I just sometimes get the feeling that it's intended for two types of users - the noob and the expert, and nothing in-between. Like on a learning curve you got the upper 20% and lowest 20% covered.
The normal user, who doesn't know many bash commands, but who also doesn't like grandma just want to click the thingie to make the interwebz go up, seems not to be too covered for with the oversimplification of some aspects.
But I'm rambling without really knowing. ;)


I don't think that's the way Ubuntu is.

I think it may be the way Texmaker is . . .

I'm not sure if there is a Windows version of Texmaker. That would be an interesting experiment if you could install it.

It might be that what you are seeing is really a function of what open source developers are doing.

There is a windows version of texmaker, I'll install it and make a screenshot.


I'm going to go back through the thread, but did you post screenshots of a difference between OpenOffice in Windows and Ubuntu?

I did so here (http://ubuntuforums.org/showpost.php?p=7369873&postcount=59). But that difference in size was due to icon preference. I just changed it.


I took a quick look back through the thread and I did notice #40.

Did anyone suggest the difference might be the text size settings in the browser. Assuming you are using Firefox, that might be worth a whirl...

If you haven't tried it.

Sorry if I'm going over stuff already discussed. This is a long thread!

The reason was that Ubuntu doesn't have microsoft fonts. So it used a bigger font in firefox. I had to install a font package and set firefox to use times new roman (like in win).

This entire thing, it's that Ubuntu looks different. More comic-ish... more unreal. It feels less structured. I guess that's just how it is. ;)

QIII
May 30th, 2009, 01:08 PM
Naaaah! C'mon!

It's like being a kid and having all sorts of toys to play with and put together is all sorts of ways until you get something you think is really cool.

Aearenda
May 30th, 2009, 01:16 PM
Speaking of toys, I've been mucking about with gnome-color-chooser, and found that you can change the button icon sizes so long as the appearances theme chosen allows it. If it doesn't, you can make it do so by editing the theme's gtkrc file, as g-c-c suggests. So now I have my current favourite theme (Balanzan) working with shorter buttons and toolbars to suit my netbook. This thread has grown really quickly, but I'm glad of it!

EmperorNero
May 30th, 2009, 01:20 PM
This thread has grown really quickly, but I'm glad of it!

I'm glad I can add something to the community as well. ;)


Here is a texmaker ubuntu-windows comparison.
As you can see it's quite different in windows.

http://ubuntuforums.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=115733&stc=1&d=1243685992

blueridgedog
May 30th, 2009, 01:20 PM
This entire thing, it's that Ubuntu looks different. More comic-ish... more unreal. It feels less structured. I guess that's just how it is. ;)

Time to read this:

http://linux.oneandoneis2.org/LNW.htm

I think you size issue is as close to resolved as you will get it. Like I mentioned before, many things seemed large to me when I moved to Ubuntu, and I did the same tricks you are doing and reached a happy point. Now my work system with windows seems small. Don't get obsessed with comparisons, but rather spend time learning about new opportunities.

EmperorNero
May 30th, 2009, 01:25 PM
Naaaah! C'mon!

It's like being a kid and having all sorts of toys to play with and put together is all sorts of ways until you get something you think is really cool.



I think you size issue is as close to resolved as you will get it. Like I mentioned before, many things seemed large to me when I moved to Ubuntu, and I did the same tricks you are doing and reached a happy point. Now my work system with windows seems small. Don't get obsessed with comparisons, but rather spend time learning about new opportunities.

I agree. It seems is all possible to resolve.
Thanks for the help.

Bradtek
May 30th, 2009, 01:58 PM
Time to read this:

http://linux.oneandoneis2.org/LNW.htm



LoL I was waiting to read the whole thread and was going to post this ...
but beaten to it

Should be compulsory reading to register here :P

EmperorNero
May 30th, 2009, 02:05 PM
Time to read this:

http://linux.oneandoneis2.org/LNW.htm



LoL I was waiting to read the whole thread and was going to post this ...
but beaten to it

Should be compulsory reading to register here :P

I'm reading it right now. I find it quite interesting actually.

New: But I don't want it to come apart. I just want a toy car!

SunnyRabbiera
May 30th, 2009, 02:10 PM
Texmaker looks bigger in windows by those screenshots to me.

growled
May 30th, 2009, 02:23 PM
Texmaker looks bigger in windows by those screenshots to me.
I thought so too but assumed it was just me.

EmperorNero
May 30th, 2009, 02:50 PM
I think this is helpful in my case:

New users come to Linux after spending their lives using an OS where the end-user's needs are paramount, and "user friendly" and "customer focus" are considered veritable Holy Grails. And they suddenly find themselves using an OS that still relies on 'man' files, the command-line, hand-edited configuration files, and Google.
http://linux.oneandoneis2.org/LNW.htm

albinootje
May 30th, 2009, 03:35 PM
Here is a texmaker ubuntu-windows comparison. As you can see it's quite different in windows.


It is different, but the icons in the upper toolbar are about the same size in both cases.
I suggest you focus your obsession on something else :-)

unutbu
May 30th, 2009, 03:52 PM
The texmaker in Jaunty is version 1.8. (See http://packages.ubuntu.com/jaunty/texmaker)
The texmaker deb package available here http://www.xm1math.net/texmaker/download.html is version 1.9.1. (Save the .deb file to your machine. Double-click it (in the file browser) to install.)

The reason why Windows looks different is mainly because the texmaker version is different, not because the OS is different.

Attached is a screenshot of texmaker version 1.9.1 running on Ubuntu (Intrepid).

EmperorNero
May 30th, 2009, 04:11 PM
It is different, but the icons in the upper toolbar are about the same size in both cases.
I suggest you focus your obsession on something else :-)

Oh, I didn't complain or say they we're bigger. That's all fine.
So yeah, I obsess about something else. ;)


The texmaker in Jaunty is version 1.8. (See http://packages.ubuntu.com/jaunty/texmaker)
The texmaker deb package available here http://www.xm1math.net/texmaker/download.html is version 1.9.1. (Save the .deb file to your machine. Double-click it (in the file browser) to install.)

The reason why Windows looks different is mainly because the texmaker version is different, not because the OS is different.

Attached is a screenshot of texmaker version 1.9.1 running on Ubuntu (Intrepid).

Yes, I also checked the versions in both operating systems.
There is no problem with programs looking a little different or
even having different functionality on the other operating system.
The concern was only that Ubuntu seemed bigger.

QIII
May 30th, 2009, 08:24 PM
Don't know if anyone is still looking at this thread . . .

I loved the article posted, but have a slight issue with:

"Windows/cars are not safe from viruses/theft unless you install an antivirus/lock the doors. Linux/motorbikes don't have viruses/doors, so are perfectly safe without you having to install an antivirus/lock any doors."

Linux is relatively safe from viruses for the moment.

There are a few viruses in the wild that can attack Linux.

Anytime anyone says "Linux doesn't get viruses", I say "YET".

If Linux had the market share Windows does, it would be targetted.

blueridgedog
May 30th, 2009, 10:00 PM
the article is getting a little bit dated at this point..I agree.

nandemonai
May 30th, 2009, 10:18 PM
One thing I always do on a fresh gnome install is this:

System -> Preferences -> Appearance -> Interface -> Toolbar button labels 'text only'. That and adjust the font DPI.

Aearenda
May 31st, 2009, 12:16 AM
New users come to Linux after spending their lives using an OS where the end-user's needs are paramount, and "user friendly" and "customer focus" are considered veritable Holy Grails. And they suddenly find themselves using an OS that still relies on 'man' files, the command-line, hand-edited configuration files, and Google.
I think I'd write this so:

New users come to Linux today after spending their recent years using an OS where big business's needs are paramount, consumerism is the holy grail, and "user friendly" and "customer focus" are considered only later, so that they are constrained in what they can do with their hardware, as if stuck on a railway line. And they suddenly find themselves using an OS that sets them free to wander the roads and fields, and so they need new maps, new friends for the journey, and new ways of using Google.

EmperorNero
May 31st, 2009, 01:38 AM
Is there a technical reason that Ubuntu looks more comic-ish while windows looks - for lack of a better word - clear?
I'm not saying I dislike it, it's just that my Win XP with the classic theme looked more detailed.
I always switch off the luna theme the first thing after a install.

Didius Falco
May 31st, 2009, 01:55 AM
Is there a technical reason that Ubuntu looks more comic-ish while windows looks - for lack of a better word - clear?
I'm not saying I dislike it, it's just that my Win XP with the classic theme looked more detailed.
I always switch off the luna theme the first thing after a install.

There are several "flavors" of Ubuntu, each with it's own default desktop manager. You can run Ubuntu with a black screen and a command line, with KDE, Gnome, XFCE and several others. Each has a default look, but each is also customizable. You can install all the different desktop managers on the same Ubuntu install and choose between them at log in.

There are also literally hundreds of themes out there. Here is a popular site for Gnome themes:

http://www.gnome-look.org/

Can't find anything you like there? You'll find instructions on how to make your own on that site.

Or you can do a web search for gnome themes, etc.

The possibilities are nearly endless.

Regards,

Didius

newbeeman
May 31st, 2009, 02:20 AM
I have read this thread from one end to the other and no one has mentioned a set of key strokes to control size.
Press "Control and + or -" on the number pad and you'll get a smaller or larger image. Easy!
Don't know what the fuss is all about, I think Ubuntu is the greatest as is.

EmperorNero
May 31st, 2009, 03:34 AM
The possibilities are nearly endless.

Yes, that's the appeal for me.


I have read this thread from one end to the other and no one has mentioned a set of key strokes to control size.
Press "Control and + or -" on the number pad and you'll get a smaller or larger image. Easy!
Don't know what the fuss is all about, I think Ubuntu is the greatest as is.

Thanks for the reading effort. But you mean in firefox?
I don't want to zoom every single page I visit. What a pain...

yoasif
May 31st, 2009, 03:56 AM
Thanks for the reading effort. But you mean in firefox?
I don't want to zoom every single page I visit. What a pain...did you try changing the font size in firefox prefs? you can even force firefox to use your fonts on every page.

blueridgedog
May 31st, 2009, 04:16 AM
Is there a technical reason that Ubuntu looks more comic-ish while windows looks - for lack of a better word - clear?
I'm not saying I dislike it, it's just that my Win XP with the classic theme looked more detailed.
I always switch off the luna theme the first thing after a install.

Look at the years between the development of the two and consider the global aspects of gnome and Ubuntu. The look grows on you and (in my opinion) is modern and inviting.

blueridgedog
May 31st, 2009, 04:26 AM
Thanks for the reading effort. But you mean in firefox?
I don't want to zoom every single page I visit. What a pain...

It remembers each page's zoom level. I use it a great deal.

bobbob1016
May 31st, 2009, 04:30 AM
EmperorNero, are you in Texas? Because they say everything is bigger there... Sorry, I had to, well wanted to...

EmperorNero
May 31st, 2009, 04:56 AM
EmperorNero, are you in Texas? Because they say everything is bigger there... Sorry, I had to, well wanted to...

That's actually funny.

This is a screenshot of blueridgedog's avatar under Ubuntu and Windows.
They are the same size, so I'm just seeing things. :confused:

http://ubuntuforums.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=115832&stc=1&d=1243742162

EmperorNero
May 31st, 2009, 05:47 AM
Well, the only thing that is left keeping me from finally deciding to switch to ubuntu is that I would be stuck with no programs I can get much use of. ;)
Ubuntu versions seem all a little gayer than windows versions, and they seem to be lagging behind, what we have seen on Texmaker being version 1.8 as opposed to 1.9.1.

emeraldgirl08
May 31st, 2009, 09:37 AM
Why don't you dual-boot emperor? I keep both my Windows and Linux on the same HD.

Whenever I need to get a task done quickly in a familiar setting I use the XP boot. Yes I did notice the weird fonts and shape of things in Linux when I first arrived. I messed with my fonts until I came to a happy medium. I didn't mimic Windows b/c I consequentially found a font setting I'm comfortable with.

Mosaab
May 31st, 2009, 09:47 AM
where are the huge bottuns, your screenshot is normal

EmperorNero
May 31st, 2009, 10:14 AM
Why don't you dual-boot emperor? I keep both my Windows and Linux on the same HD.

Whenever I need to get a task done quickly in a familiar setting I use the XP boot.

Good idea. I have both installed at the moment while deciding if I want to switch.
I just assumed that I should stick with the one I pick, but I can keep both until I make up my mind.
Will only const me 10 seconds on boot.


Yes I did notice the weird fonts and shape of things in Linux when I first arrived. I messed with my fonts until I came to a happy medium. I didn't mimic Windows b/c I consequentially found a font setting I'm comfortable with.

True. And now there are some features in Ubuntu that I would miss. Like the mouse-wheel paste feature.
What's keeping me is that Linux programs are not as functional and usually lagging behind windows.
I like protext and maple and netbeans 6.7.

hobo14
May 31st, 2009, 10:33 AM
I don't see anything big on the screenshot....?

EmperorNero
May 31st, 2009, 10:41 AM
I don't see anything big on the screenshot....?

Which one?

Sir Jasper
May 31st, 2009, 11:04 AM
Hi,

I use the Firefox add-on "No Squint" which I find quicker than using repeated Ctrl +'s or -'s.

I have the opposite problem in that displays are frequently far too small for me. However, I'm not trying to hijack this thread and I may eventually open my own thread - so please, no replies.

My regards

EmperorNero
May 31st, 2009, 11:55 AM
Is Ubuntu supposed to beep after I hit shut down?

Bradtek
May 31st, 2009, 12:09 PM
http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1169818&highlight=shutdown+beep+jaunty

But I wonder how often are people shutting it down for it to be annoying lol

EmperorNero
May 31st, 2009, 12:58 PM
http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1169818&highlight=shutdown+beep+jaunty

But I wonder how often are people shutting it down for it to be annoying lol

So I have to black list the speaker. I can't fix the error that causes the beep?


I have a Intel graphics card, how do I know whether Ubuntu has issues with it, since I am new to Ubuntu and have no comparison.

Performance regressions on Intel graphics cards

Users of Intel video chipsets have reported performance regressions in Ubuntu 8.10 compared with previous releases (252094). Many of the issues have been resolved in Ubuntu 9.04, but some remain.

Some users have found improved performance by using the "greedy" migration heuristic. This can be done by running "sudo gedit /etc/X11/xorg.conf", and adding Option "MigrationHeuristic" "greedy" to the Device section of your xorg.conf.

Alternatively, a new experimental acceleration architecture option, "DRI2/UXA", is available for Intel graphics users which our testing has found provides significant performance improvements in some cases, but has also shown risk of severe stability problems. You can opt-in to enable this by running "sudo gedit /etc/X11/xorg.conf", and adding Option "AccelMethod" "UXA" to the Device section of your xorg.conf. Users wishing to maximize stability should stay with the standard default acceleration method, "EXA".

nandemonai
May 31st, 2009, 01:14 PM
So I have to black list the speaker. I can't fix the error that causes the beep?

It's not an error. Linux is a multi-user operating system. It's to alert other users that a shutdown is taking place via a tty broadcast.

http://ubuntuforums.org/showpost.php?p=7376118&postcount=11

EmperorNero
May 31st, 2009, 01:26 PM
It's not an error. Linux is a multi-user operating system. It's to alert other users that a shutdown is taking place via a tty broadcast.

http://ubuntuforums.org/showpost.php?p=7376118&postcount=11

Like when a school has a bunch of PC's on linux via a server, then shutting down the server will send a warning to all the individual PC's?

Is there a way to make ubuntu forget about that user stuff since it's only me on that PC?

albinootje
May 31st, 2009, 02:08 PM
Is there a way to make ubuntu forget about that user stuff since it's only me on that PC?

If you want no beep during shutdown, then make a script that unloads the pcspkr kernel module.
See here for the symbolic links to scripts during shutdown : /etc/rc0.d/
This is the first one being executed, so I assume you'd give it a K01 (What's the difference between K01 and S01 ?) as a prefix too.


K01gdm -> ../init.d/gdm

blueridgedog
May 31st, 2009, 02:15 PM
EmperorNero, are you in Texas? Because they say everything is bigger there... Sorry, I had to, well wanted to...

I was waiting for the Texas comment...or the "you must have the Texas distro". Love it.

nandemonai
May 31st, 2009, 02:16 PM
Like when a school has a bunch of PC's on linux via a server, then shutting down the server will send a warning to all the individual PC's?

Essentially yes. More so for tty / ssh logins. In such situations you'd specify a timeout on the shutdown to give people time to save and logout.


Is there a way to make ubuntu forget about that user stuff since it's only me on that PC?

That I'm not sure about. I'm certain it's possible though.

blueridgedog
May 31st, 2009, 02:29 PM
Ubuntu versions seem all a little gayer than windows versions, and they seem to be lagging behind

Well, they are certainly a lot more up to date than the versions that come WITH windows!! Ha.

Seriously though, you are welcome to go outside the repositories and get anything you feel is out of date. I go to the source for a few applications that I needed bug fixes or enhancements for sooner than the Ubuntu release schedule. You can either add the repository for the application you want, download a .deb file and install it or compile if from source. The versions available via the repositories are the ones that were stable at the time of release and since there are thousands, they are not updated necessarily just because a new release comes out. Synaptic, apt-get and the rest of the package management system are there to make it easy to get what you want (among other things) but not to restrict you.

Viva
May 31st, 2009, 02:37 PM
Nero, you're worrying too much over things not worth the worry. There is a lot more to ubuntu that make it more customizable, efficient and better looking than any os out there. Just look at the screenshots thread(link in my signature) to see what I'm talking about.

EmperorNero
May 31st, 2009, 02:41 PM
When I install a program on ubuntu, it als installs a shortcut. And when I remove that program it seems to remove that shortcut.
Under windows it felt like I had control over where things were installed to. How does that work in linux?
Where are installed programs? Do the shortcuts always get reomved automatically?

JKyleOKC
May 31st, 2009, 03:18 PM
What's the difference between K01 and S01 ?

The K* scripts are executed at shutdown (K for Kill) and the S* scripts are executed at boot (S for Start).

Hope this helps.

albinootje
May 31st, 2009, 03:24 PM
When I install a program on ubuntu, it als installs a shortcut. And when I remove that program it seems to remove that shortcut.

It usually does not. Unless you mean a menu entry.


Where are installed programs? Do the shortcuts always get reomved automatically?
Binaries usually end up in /usr/bin
If you compile from source in the old-fashioned way, then everything, by default, ends up in /usr/local/
If you compile from deb sources, then it'll be /usr/bin again.

You can open up the content of a deb file and see the whole directory tree. See screenshots.

EmperorNero
May 31st, 2009, 03:47 PM
Binaries usually end up in /usr/bin
If you compile from source in the old-fashioned way, then everything, by default, ends up in /usr/local/
If you compile from deb sources, then it'll be /usr/bin again.

Thanks.
So the files are just "somewhere"? There's not a folder where I can find the files of an application, to backup my profile data, like I did with openoffice?

Viva
May 31st, 2009, 03:54 PM
Your profiles are saved in your home folder. The openoffice profile is saved as a hidden folder. /home/YOUR_USER_NAME/.openoffice.org

w.yu
July 16th, 2009, 01:49 AM
identify with what you said in the OP Emperor.

everything looked sort of cartoonish/blown-up to an extent - like those kindergarten books i used to read as a 3 year old.

then I realized that in my o.c.d behaviour on Windows, I had customized things to look even smaller than it already was - so I could cram more onto my 17" screen (and move my mouse less). :D

the ubuntu answer for that seems to be workspaces.

so I decided, go with the flow, there's much more to ubuntu than aesthetics. (although aesthetics probably was the major reason for me trying out ubuntu)

now I can actually sit ~1 metre from my screen and enjoy looking at the icons + text on my desktop. Quite possibly save my eyes from further deterioration. :P

essentially, it is your prerogative to resize and restyle, but it's like dating two different girls. What we're accustomed with may not be what's best for us. ubuntu seems to present a different solution to a common problem - and if not, you can always design a solution yourself. :P

as a side note, ubuntu breathed new life into my twice reincarnated 4 year old laptop. Enjoying it. When (if) my o.c.d kicks in, then I shall look into re-cramming more onto my screen. Probably not.

also, while the icons -are- bigger, i think the spacings or margins or whatever you wish to call them are significantly wider/taller than in Windows. And that makes quite a big difference, resizing the icons may not be enough if the width/height of rows/columns are static.

thanks for reading my ramble! :P

lisati
July 16th, 2009, 02:07 AM
Here is a screenshot of how big the buttons in most programs look.

Looks normal to me..... I prefer this size over what Windows sometimes gives me.

H2SO_four
July 16th, 2009, 05:08 AM
OMG the buttons are so... so... normal sized.

CompizDoDo
July 16th, 2009, 05:31 AM
either you have awesome vision and cant stand normal sized things or some kind of handicapped/universal access item is on i have the same screen resolution and it works great not big or anything

demiskateboard
November 16th, 2009, 05:15 AM
For me, it look normal.

ArinSky
November 16th, 2009, 05:29 AM
I moved over when i upgraded to windows 7 (dual booted)... which also has slightly larger buttons. The best advice i can give is make use of all the amazing capabilities with keyboard shortcuts that ubuntu offers that vastly improve how productive a workspace is over windows, and use multiple desktops. more than makes up for it, and to be honest when i changed from xp to win7/ubuntu i really didn't notice the size change because it's just not that dramatic.