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EmperorNero
May 27th, 2009, 08:16 PM
I am currently a windows XP Home user, who is curious to switch to a open source alternative.
The reason is that I don't play games and dislike windows wasting so much memory.
Also I like the idea of potentially having full control over my operating system and not being forced to for example pre-load internet explorer by microsoft.

The likely first choice was ubuntu, as it seems to be made for user-friendliness.
From the guides I read I got the idea that I should do some learning before I do the switch.
So that's why I am here. :p
As a first question I would like to know what programming language is required for editing ubuntu.

Cheers. :p

EDIT: Please move on to later posts in this thread, as the early questions have been answered. Thanks.

Didius Falco
May 27th, 2009, 08:24 PM
Welcome to the Ubuntu forums!

There really aren't any *required* programming languages for basic editing. You'll do some things at the command line, and you can write Bash scripts, others do things in Python, etc.

For advice on writing programs for Ubuntu, you'd do well to head to the Development and Programming sub-forum:

http://ubuntuforums.org/forumdisplay.php?f=310

Regards,

Didius

Celauran
May 27th, 2009, 08:26 PM
As a first question I would like to know what programming language is required for editing ubuntu.

Like any Linux distribution, Ubuntu is a collection of a large number of applications written in many different languages. That said, 'editing ubuntu' itself is pretty vague. Give us a better idea at specifically what you're looking to do and we may be able to give you a better answer.

albinootje
May 27th, 2009, 08:28 PM
From the guides I read I got the idea that I should do some learning before I do the switch.
So that's why I am here. :p

The Ubuntu pocket guide is interesting
http://www.ubuntupocketguide.com/
but see here also :
http://help.ubuntu.com
http://wiki.ubuntu.com
http://www.psychocats.net/ubuntu/
and also :
http://ubuntuguide.org/wiki/Ubuntu:Jaunty


As a first question I would like to know what programming language is required for editing ubuntu.


Can you clarify that question ? Are you talking about customizing Ubuntu ? If so, can you specify what you had in mind ?

philinux
May 27th, 2009, 08:34 PM
I am currently a windows XP Home user, who is curious to switch to a open source alternative.
The reason is that I don't play games and dislike windows wasting so much memory.
Also I like the idea of potentially having full control over my operating system and not being forced to for example pre-load internet explorer by microsoft.

The likely first choice was ubuntu, as it seems to be made for user-friendliness.
From the guides I read I got the idea that I should do some learning before I do the switch.
So that's why I am here. :p
As a first question I would like to know what programming language is required for editing ubuntu.

Cheers. :p

Ubuntu like windows has config files etc. To edit these all that is required is a text editor like gedit. That said the default install should run fine. There are many gui's for "editing" ubuntu. If by that you mean customising.

Sealbhach
May 27th, 2009, 08:42 PM
First thing I would recommend is to get Unetbootin and create a live USB:

http://unetbootin.sourceforge.net/

That way you can have a good look at Ubuntu before you jump in. You could use a CD and run it off the CD but USB is faster. You don't need to know any code to run Ubuntu, for myself I had to edit a config file to get my laptop sound working properly, but I just copied the instructions I found on the forums.

.

Awareness
May 27th, 2009, 08:45 PM
I second the unetbooting thing...

the best way to learn is to get your hands dirty... You dont have specific questions yet coz you havent tried to achieve anything yet ;)

newbee70
May 27th, 2009, 09:04 PM
I am currently a windows XP Home user, who is curious to switch to a open source alternative.
The reason is that I don't play games and dislike windows wasting so much memory.
Also I like the idea of potentially having full control over my operating system and not being forced to for example pre-load internet explorer by microsoft.

The likely first choice was ubuntu, as it seems to be made for user-friendliness.
From the guides I read I got the idea that I should do some learning before I do the switch.
So that's why I am here. :p
As a first question I would like to know what programming language is required for editing ubuntu.

Cheers. :p

here is another link for you to learn a little out about linux, scroll down the page to see the terminal commands in order, if you use a live cd of ubuntu you can open a terminal and use the examples to show you how to use terminal.

http://www.computerhope.com/unix.htm

And WELCOME TO THE FORUMS, where everyone is more than willing to help you out with the expected new users problems.

EmperorNero
May 27th, 2009, 09:05 PM
Thanks for the quick answers. This forum seems to work very good. :p
Also thanks to all responses, that I don't address.


Give us a better idea at specifically what you're looking to do and we may be able to give you a better answer.


Can you clarify that question ? Are you talking about customizing Ubuntu ? If so, can you specify what you had in mind ?

Well, I'm just at the beginning of figuring this out, so instead of bothering you I should just read the guides and tutorials, as my questions are probably addressed there.
My concern was when I install ubuntu, I for example can't open exe's and most programs. It seems to me that I can't really do anything with your computer then, unless I do some programming work.
I for example want those two bars (the one on the top and the bottom) combined into one like in windows. And for example pressing the 'back ' button on my mouse, doesn't seem to work in folders under ubuntu. (I already experimented with a ubuntu Live CD.)

Celauran
May 27th, 2009, 09:10 PM
.exe files are Windows executables and are not intended to work under Linux. Linux has its own set of applications. Fortunately, if there are Windows apps you cannot live without, there is WINE.

albinootje
May 27th, 2009, 09:23 PM
Well, I'm just at the beginning of figuring this out, so instead of bothering you I should just read the guides and tutorials, as my questions are probably addressed there.

I fully agree with one other poster that you should start "hands on", and try a live session.
The live session is, in itself, really cool.
You can boot from an Ubuntu installation cdrom or usb, choose "Try without making changes", and then see which hardware works out of the box, *and* you can even install software (in RAM)!
After a reboot everything should be back like it was before.
Is that cool or what ?


My concern was when I install ubuntu, I for example can't open exe's and most programs. It seems to me that I can't really do anything with your computer then, unless I do some programming work.

You can also not easily run MacOSX binaries on Linux or on MS-Windows, so.. ?
It is possible to run all kind of .exe files in Linux but why not try native Linux applications first ?
After all, if you jump on the Linux bandwagon, you are part of the community, with your stories, questions, complaints you will likely contribute in the development and shared knowledge of Linux.


I for example want those two bars (the one on the top and the bottom) combined into one like in windows.

That is quite possible to do, and pretty easy. But I suggest you keep the "minimized windows notification" area before you become dependent on the "alt-tab" key ;-)


And for example pressing the 'back ' button on my mouse, doesn't seem to work in folders under ubuntu.

There's a wide range in file managers to choose from. Nautilus is the default in Ubuntu, (and not the fastest at all) try some others.


(I already experimented with a ubuntu Live CD.)
Great! :)

NHArticleTen
May 27th, 2009, 09:28 PM
if you wanted to do a little toe-dipping into *nix stuph then I'd suggest finding an old box to put Damn Small Linux or Puppy Linux on. That way you can dip your toes and if you make it crash it only takes a few short minutes to reinstall the WHOLE operating system!

EmperorNero
May 27th, 2009, 11:51 PM
.exe files are Windows executables and are not intended to work under Linux. Linux has its own set of applications. Fortunately, if there are Windows apps you cannot live without, there is WINE.

Do do you ever download and install a file under Linux? Or how does that work?

Cheesemill
May 28th, 2009, 12:02 AM
You shouldn't ever have to download any programs directly from the internet.
You should be able to find everything you need in the built-in Add/Remove Programs application (this is one of the best features of Ubuntu).

Check out this for a great beginners guide:
http://www.psychocats.net/ubuntu/installingsoftware
and this blog entry:
http://www.psychocats.net/ubuntucat/software-installation-in-linux-is-difficult/ (very sarcastic) !!

Cheesemill

Edit - Or just fire up Add/Remove Programs on the Live CD and have a browse.

albinootje
May 28th, 2009, 12:09 AM
Do do you ever download and install a file under Linux? Or how does that work?

It is best to stick to the Ubuntu repositories.

And if you really think that you need MS-Windows software, see here :
http://www.playonlinux.com/en/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CrossOver

But again, please try all the Linux alternatives first with add/remove or Synaptic Package Manager, and see here :
http://www.osalt.com/
http://www.linux.org/apps/
http://linuxappfinder.com/

EmperorNero
May 28th, 2009, 12:17 AM
Thanks to all responses and postings of links to guides.

What if I for example want to run NetBeans, LaTeX or Maple on ubuntu, there seem to be no ubuntu versions?
So I would have to use WINE...

Cheesemill
May 28th, 2009, 12:19 AM
Thanks to all responses and postings of links to guides.

What if I for example want to run NetBeans, LaTeX or Maple on ubuntu, there seem to be no ubuntu versions?
So I would have to use WINE...

They're all ready to install out of the box, just go to Add/Remove programs and select NetBeans/LaTeX etc... and Ubuntu will download and install them for you automatically, as well as keeping them up to date for you.

Ubuntu already knows about 99% of the programes you'll ever need to install.

Cheesemill

unutbu
May 28th, 2009, 12:25 AM
There is a netbeans package in the official "universe" repository.

LaTeX is installed by the texlive package, also in the official repository.

Maple is commercial software, so you would need a license for the Linux version of Maple.

If you are willing to learn a different way of doing things, however, you might be pleased with Python+scipy+numpy+matplotlib. If you really need symbolic manipulation, however, then there are some Linux projects (such as SAGE http://www.sagemath.org/doc/tutorial/tour.html) but nothing in the FLOSS world (that I know of) is quite on par with Maple or Mathematica yet when it comes to symbolic manipulation.

Cheesemill
May 28th, 2009, 12:32 AM
If there are any Windows apps you simply can't do without then you can either try Wine (not guaranteed to work, check out http://appdb.winehq.org/ for application compatibility) or you can run Windows XP in a virtual machine.

This should be a last resort though, most of the time you'll be able to find a native linux app that will do the job just as well if not better.

Cheesemill

EmperorNero
May 28th, 2009, 12:37 AM
So in ubuntu you have to use an update manager? I always disliked them. I don't wan't to bad-mouth
it without knowing much. It's just that these managers usually want to force you to update all the time
and it feels so out of control. Also you have to be connected to the internet to install your software.
I sometimes use older versions of programs just because the new versions come with some update manager.

ugm6hr
May 28th, 2009, 12:43 AM
So in ubuntu you have to use an update manager? I always disliked them. I don't wan't to bad-mouth
it without knowing much. It's just that these managers usually want to force you to update all the time
and it feels so out of control. Also you have to be connected to the internet to install your software.
I sometimes use older versions of programs just because the new versions come with some update manager.

If you don't have broadband internet, I'd suggest Ubuntu will not be as user-friendly as you might like.

The "update manager" is how almost all Linux distros install applications and keep them updated and safe. You will be asked if you want to update, but not in an annoying way.

Also, there is a single unified "update manager" for every single application in Ubuntu, unlike the individual ones for each application in MS.

But if you don't like it, then there is little that can be done.

wsonar
May 28th, 2009, 12:46 AM
I noticed having a lot more control on ubuntu updates than other distro's

Didius Falco
May 28th, 2009, 12:47 AM
So in ubuntu you have to use an update manager? I always disliked them. I don't wan't to bad-mouth
it without knowing much. It's just that these managers usually want to force you to update all the time
and it feels so out of control. Also you have to be connected to the internet to install your software.
I sometimes use older versions of programs just because the new versions come with some update manager.

You don't have to use the Update manager. You have very fine-grained control of it. You can turn it off completely, set it up to update any combination of: Important Security Updates, Recommended Updates, Pre-Release Updates, Unsupported Updates (backports), or none at all.

You can also set it up to check for updates: Never, Daily, Every Two Days, Weekly, Every Two Weeks.

It can be set up to: Install Security updates without notification, Download all updates in the background and only Notify about available updates.

You can also set it up to Never show new distribution releases, only show Normal releases or only show Long Term Support Releases.

In short, it does everything but get someone to come to your house and do it for you. ;)

Regards,

Didius

mgranet
May 28th, 2009, 12:58 AM
I for example want those two bars (the one on the top and the bottom) combined into one like in windows.

Have you tried Kubuntu? It has a more Windows-like feel.

Cheesemill
May 28th, 2009, 12:59 AM
Also Ubuntu doesn't upgrade from one version of your software to a newer one by default (ie Firefox 2.x to Firefox 3.x), thus not changing the look and behaviour of your apps. Only security and bug-fix updates are applied for the lifetime of the release.

You can however choose to install the latest versions of specific apps (all within the same Update Manager framework), but only if you want to :)

Cheesemill

EmperorNero
May 28th, 2009, 01:01 AM
But if you don't like it, then there is little that can be done.


In short, it does everything but get someone to come to your house and do it for you. ;)

I might just have to get used to it. ;)

Another thing I noticed is that everything is so much bigger in ubuntu. Not only icons and even on the same resolution.
You can only fit a fraction on the screen of what you are used to. Is there a option to... like zoom out?

And can you have the way you handle icons as in windows or to I have to figure out the new controls?

EmperorNero
May 28th, 2009, 01:05 AM
Have you tried Kubuntu? It has a more Windows-like feel.

I just looked it up.

Now that I think of it, I really just want a windows 98 theme and handling, is there such a theme?

mgranet
May 28th, 2009, 01:07 AM
I just looked it up.

Now that I think of it, I really just want a windows 98 theme and handling, is there such a theme?

The closest thing I can think of that looks like win98 would be KDE3. (kubuntu 8.04)

albinootje
May 28th, 2009, 01:13 AM
So in ubuntu you have to use an update manager? I always disliked them. I don't wan't to bad-mouth
it without knowing much.

I suggest you start using Ubuntu first for at least a few weeks, and then judge.
Apart from that the update manager settings can be tweaked to bother you only once a week, or bother you every day only about security updates and not other updates.

Remember, you're about to install an Operating System which is about f r e e d o m ... and that includes freedom of choice.

Enjoy!

theozzlives
May 28th, 2009, 01:14 AM
If you can, forget Windows and go back to DOS (only more secure and different commands). Ubuntu is very customizable and allows a lot of control of the system. You do have WINE but I prefer not to use Windows programs. I never have liked Windows.

Cheesemill
May 28th, 2009, 01:17 AM
I might just have to get used to it. ;)

Another thing I noticed is that everything is so much bigger in ubuntu. Not only icons and even on the same resolution.
You can only fit a fraction on the screen of what you are used to. Is there a option to... like zoom out?

And can you have the way you handle icons as in windows or to I have to figure out the new controls?

Are you sure your using your monitors best native resolution?
If your currently running from the Live CD then chances are you haven't got your video drivers installed yet - you can only use the drivers on Ubuntu when it's installed on to your hard drive.

If everything is still to big for you it's easy enough to customize the appearance of the OS to however you want it. Whenever I install the first thing I do is head to System > Preferences > Appearance and take all the font sizes down a point or two, it makes a big difference.

Check out:
http://www.compiz-themes.org/
http://www.gnome-look.org/
and the monthly screenshots thread
May - http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1144440
for some inspiration.

Cheesemill


Edit - If you post the specs of your computer people should be able to let you know if you'll run into any major problems with your hardware.

EmperorNero
May 28th, 2009, 01:20 AM
Remember, you're about to install an Operating System which is about f r e e d o m ... and that includes freedom of choice.


Yeeh! Me likes freedom!


I never have liked Windows.

Was finally pushed me over the edge with windows was learning that it preloads inernet explorer.
So I use firefox but still it forces me to spend memory on ie.

albinootje
May 28th, 2009, 01:22 AM
Another thing I noticed is that everything is so much bigger in ubuntu. Not only icons and even on the same resolution.
You can only fit a fraction on the screen of what you are used to. Is there a option to... like zoom out?

Which Ubuntu release are you testing ? And which video card do you have ?

EmperorNero
May 28th, 2009, 01:28 AM
Are you sure your using your monitors best native resolution?

I had ubuntu installed for a moment, I'm in a re-formatting phase at the moment. ;)
And the resolution was the same as in windows. 1280x800. Just everything was so huge.


If you post the specs of your computer people should be able to let you know if you'll run into any major problems with your hardware.

I have a Dell inspiron 6400 with crappy onboard graphics and 512MB memory. I will upgrade to 2 GB or 3,1 GB memory soon.
CPU Intel Pentium M, 1.86 GHz (Yonah)
Motherboard Dell MM061
Memory 2x256MB DDR2-533
Graphics Card 945GM Express Onboard (224 MB shared memory)
Hard Drive Hitachi 60GB, 5.400 rpm
Sound Card SIGMATEL STAC 92XX C-Major HD
Broadcom WLAN

Which Ubuntu release are you testing ? And which video card do you have ?

Ubuntu 9.04

ugm6hr
May 28th, 2009, 01:35 AM
Now that I think of it, I really just want a windows 98 theme and handling, is there such a theme?

Win 98 themes are abundant for most desktop environments, but similar "handling" is harder, since Ubuntu is not Windows.

You might like to try out LXDE, which is much more Win 98 in nature. However, it does lack a decent menu editor, and some networking facilities. It takes a little fiddling with to get started, but might be to your liking.

There are some pre-built LXDE + Ubuntu versions around (U-lite, for example), but a clean LXDE + Ubuntu is easily accomplished (see link below).

EmperorNero
May 28th, 2009, 07:32 PM
Now I'm running ubuntu on a real install. I also installed xubuntu, but it was a little simplistic for my taste.

How do I install Latex and NetBeans? When I start the Synaptic thing it just tells me it crashed.

E: dpkg was interrupted, you must manually run 'sudo dpkg --configure -a' to correct the problem.
E: _cache->open() failed, please report.

And even I turned off sounds, it beeps when I start or shut down.

ugm6hr
May 28th, 2009, 07:34 PM
Try following the advice in Terminal:

sudo dpkg --configure -a

This error occurs because an installation was interrupted half-way through.

Sometime you need to follow this up with:


sudo apt-get install -f

albinootje
May 28th, 2009, 07:37 PM
And even I turned off sounds, it beeps when I start or shut down.

If you want to disable the speaker permanently, do the following :


sudo bash
echo "blacklist pcspkr" >> /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist.conf
exit
sudo modprobe -r pcspkr

EmperorNero
May 28th, 2009, 07:50 PM
Try following the advice in Terminal:

sudo dpkg --configure -aThis error occurs because an installation was interrupted half-way through.
Yes, I wanted to install two packages, but it just told me that it can't install the one and later that the other had crashed.
Upon entering the code, it tells me this:

dpkg: failed to write status record about `mono-2.0-gac' to `/var/lib/dpkg/status': No space left on deviceSometimes it asks me for my password but I can't type anything...?

Edit: Might I run out of disk space because I only gave Ubuntu a fraction of the hard disk?

Celauran
May 28th, 2009, 07:58 PM
Edit: Might I run out of disk space because I only gave Ubuntu a fraction of the hard disk?

That's possible if you really starved it. Open a console and enter:


df -h

This will tell you how much space you have left on each partition.

Celauran
May 28th, 2009, 08:01 PM
Another thing I noticed is that everything is so much bigger in ubuntu. Not only icons and even on the same resolution.
You can only fit a fraction on the screen of what you are used to. Is there a option to... like zoom out?

You can decrease the font size by going to System -> Preferences -> Appearance -> Fonts

To decrease file manager and desktop icon sizes, go to Places -> Home to bring up a Nautilus window, then go Edit -> Preferences and change the icon zoom levels.

EmperorNero
May 28th, 2009, 08:03 PM
Looks like there is no more space.
Can I easily give the partition more space? When I installed, I just picked 'Run along side windows'.


Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/sda5 2,3G 2,3G 0 100% /
tmpfs 245M 0 245M 0% /lib/init/rw
varrun 245M 100K 245M 1% /var/run
varlock 245M 0 245M 0% /var/lock
udev 245M 156K 245M 1% /dev
tmpfs 245M 76K 245M 1% /dev/shm
lrm 245M 2,4M 242M 1% /lib/modules/2.6.28-11-generic/volatile
overflow 1,0M 16K 1008K 2% /tmp
/dev/sda1 50G 12G 39G 23% /media/disk
/dev/sda7 2,3G 2,3G 0 100% /media/disk-1

Celauran
May 28th, 2009, 08:04 PM
You can use a tool like gparted to resize the partition, but you cannot resize a mounted partition, so you'll need to boot from a LiveCD.

cariboo
May 28th, 2009, 08:46 PM
Yes, I wanted to install two packages, but it just told me that it can't install the one and later that the other had crashed.
Upon entering the code, it tells me this:

dpkg: failed to write status record about `mono-2.0-gac' to `/var/lib/dpkg/status': No space left on deviceSometimes it asks me for my password but I can't type anything...?

Edit: Might I run out of disk space because I only gave Ubuntu a fraction of the hard disk?

Your password is not echoed back to you as you type it to prevent shoulder surfers from seeing the password.

EmperorNero
May 28th, 2009, 09:22 PM
Your password is not echoed back to you as you type it to prevent shoulder surfers from seeing the password.

Can I just make Ubuntu stop ever asking me for that password?

EmperorNero
May 28th, 2009, 09:58 PM
You can, technically, but it is not recommended.

Here's what you do:

Thanks. Why isn't it recommended, just for safety?

unutbu
May 28th, 2009, 10:31 PM
EmperorNero, before you disable passwords, please read this:
https://help.ubuntu.com/community/RootSudo
It explains Ubuntu's password system and why it is a good thing.
Keeping Ubuntu's password system intact allows you to see what you can and can not do as a normal user. I think it is less likely that you'll make a mistake which hoses your system if you keep passwords enabled.

Also, moving and/or resizing partitions with GParted can be a slow operation if the partitions are large. It takes somewhere between 1/2 hour to an hour to reinstall from the CD.
Depending on how much moving and resizing is required, it may be quicker to just reinstall.

A "tight" Ubuntu installation can exist in about 5GB of space. A reasonable installation can exist in about 10GB of space. If you plan on installing lots of packages, you might want to allocate 20--30GB of space for the root (/) partition.

albinootje
May 28th, 2009, 10:56 PM
Looks like there is no more space.
Can I easily give the partition more space?
Correct. Try this :


sudo apt-get clean
sudo dpkg-configure -a
sudo apt-get -f install

albinootje
May 28th, 2009, 11:01 PM
/dev/sda5 2,3G 2,3G 0 100% /

If I were you I would give Linux at least 5 Gb of space for /
So.. try this : http://www.psychocats.net/ubuntu/separatehome

EmperorNero
May 28th, 2009, 11:12 PM
I'm going to just reinstall with all of the hard disk for ubuntu (or kubuntu).
See you in a moment. :)

For now I just like to ask how to make the 'back' keys in my wireless mouse work in ubuntu explorer (maybe it's called something else, I mean folders).
Under ubuntu the back button works in firefox, and under windows it works in both firefox and explorer.
I like it to work for folders in ubuntu as well.

EmperorNero
May 29th, 2009, 12:40 AM
If you want to disable the speaker permanently, do the following :


sudo bash
echo "blacklist pcspkr" >> /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist.conf
exit
sudo modprobe -r pcspkr


Well, I don't want to tur all sound off, I just want it to not beep when it shuts down.
How do I turn the speaker on again?

unutbu
May 29th, 2009, 12:42 AM
EmperorNero, unfortunately, it looks like the forward/back mouse buttons
don't work in Nautilus (the file browser) due to a bug:
https://bugs.launchpad.net/nautilus/+bug/338040

There is an old tutorial on how to get forward/back mouse buttons to work with nautilus here: http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=401710. Although it is old, I see xbindkeys and xvkbd are still Jaunty packages so perhaps it would still work.

In Jaunty, your /etc/X11/xorg.conf is very sparse. Xorg is getting away from configuring X through xorg.conf. Your mouse buttons are already working (they work in Firfox). So I would skip step #2 of that tutorial. Instead, open a terminal (Applications>Accessories>Terminal) and type


xev

a while square window will pop up. Move your mouse into that square. Output will start streaming in to your terminal. Press your forward/back mouse keys. You will see something like this in the terminal:



ButtonPress event, serial 33, synthetic NO, window 0x3000001,
root 0x13b, subw 0x0, time 10515846, (78,89), root:(84,120),
state 0x10, button 8, same_screen YES

ButtonRelease event, serial 33, synthetic NO, window 0x3000001,
root 0x13b, subw 0x0, time 10515950, (78,89), root:(84,120),
state 0x210, button 8, same_screen YES

Take note of the button numbers associated with your forward/back mouse buttons. Above the button number is 8.

Use those numbers in step #3 of the guide: For example, when you edit the .xbindkeysrc
file, use the number 8 here:


"/usr/bin/xvkbd -xsendevent -text "\[Alt_L]\[left]""
m:0x0 + b:8

to associate pressing the back mouse button with Alt-Left (which is the key combination for Back in both Nautilus and Firefox).

unutbu
May 29th, 2009, 12:43 AM
The instructions albinootje posted will disable the pc speaker, not your normal audio. The pc speaker only makes the tinny beeping sound.

albinootje
May 29th, 2009, 12:46 AM
Well, I don't want to tur all sound off, I just want it to not beep when it shuts down.
How do I turn the speaker on again?

Edit /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist.conf and remove the last line with "blacklist pcspkr", and then do "sudo modprobe pcspkr".

EmperorNero
May 29th, 2009, 01:03 AM
Thanks to the last few posts. All very helpful.
As for that beep sound. I switched off System>Preferences>Power Management>General>Use sound to notify in event of an error.
That made the beep go away. So there has been an error with the power or something?

Sef
May 29th, 2009, 01:05 AM
Can I just make Ubuntu stop ever asking me for that password?


Quote:
Originally Posted by camper365 http://ubuntuforums.org/images/buttons/viewpost.gif (http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?p=7362824#post7362824)
You can, technically, but it is not recommended.

Here's what you do:

Thanks. Why isn't it recommended, just for safety?

By disabling that password, you have just as much security as running Windows out-of-the-box - in others words, basically NONE. GNU/Linux is more secure because it separates root from running the applications. By disabling the password, you have made it very easy to hack have your system hacked and taken over by a botnet. Yes, there are GNU/Linux botnets. In short, re-enable the password, so your system will be more secure.

EmperorNero
May 29th, 2009, 01:10 AM
By disabling that password, you have just as much security as running Windows out-of-the-box - in others words, basically NONE. GNU/Linux is more secure because it separates root from running the applications. By disabling the password, you have made it very easy to hack have your system hacked and taken over by a botnet. Yes, there are GNU/Linux botnets. In short, re-enable the password, so your system will be more secure.

I didn't switch it off after all. ;)

EmperorNero
May 29th, 2009, 03:48 AM
Can you make Ubuntu save window positions?

EmperorNero
June 2nd, 2009, 01:20 AM
Use those numbers in step #3 of the guide: For example, when you edit the .xbindkeysrc
file, use the number 8 here:


"/usr/bin/xvkbd -xsendevent -text "\[Alt_L]\[left]""
m:0x0 + b:8

to associate pressing the back mouse button with Alt-Left (which is the key combination for Back in both Nautilus and Firefox).

That file seems to be empty on my system, I added the code with the appropriate keys but it doesn't seem to work.