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View Full Version : Reccomend a Dedicated Web Host Service?



DWRZ
May 13th, 2009, 06:37 AM
My host, despite offering "unlimited" storage and bandwith, is threatening to shut down my site for... using too much storage and bandwith. I run a personal webspace, mediawiki with only one user, but have almost _all_ my photographs up online. I don't get too many visitors-- it's mostly up for myself, family, friends.

I'm looking for a dedicated web host that will handle setup and have storage for at least 500GB-- I'm on shared hosting right now, I'd like something a little faster but otherwise I'm pleased with my current "speed". [EDIT]: I also need something that will keep my domain email going.

Can anyone reccomend any good services? Ones that have never let you down? Or otherwise comment on the virtues/difficulties of collocation or hosting from home? Google seems to offer more advertisements than anything really useful.

Much thanks in advance from this web-n00b.

Corelogik
May 13th, 2009, 07:39 AM
I've used Bluehost, http://www.bluehost.com for years and very rarely have issues. They specialize in shared hosting but dedicated hosting is also available.

They have several good packages and tech support 24/7/365 by phone. I don't think they handle setup, you'll have to do that, but they will walk you through domain transfer and anything else you need help with.

They offer more services than I can use and they have a KB and a forum for p2p help. If you need any further info or theres anything I can help with, let me know.

DWRZ
May 13th, 2009, 08:44 AM
Thanks. As far as I can tell though, they just don't do dedicated. :\

Orlsend
May 13th, 2009, 09:22 AM
I used Hostmonster, I abuse it as it was the amazon media service that big Video web-sites use. They have lived up to thair claims for the 2.5 years I been abusing it.

DWRZ
May 13th, 2009, 09:29 AM
Thanks, but I really can't risk the frustration anymore. I figure it might as well be time to leap into dedicated service. Either that, or hosting from home. It is getting on my nerves so much to deal with these hosting companies... or even the way they adverstise themselves.

binbash
May 13th, 2009, 09:33 AM
layered tech.I am using them for 3-4 years.

Corelogik
May 13th, 2009, 10:25 AM
Thanks. As far as I can tell though, they just don't do dedicated. :\

They do have it. I setup a client with it. You just have to call them for it. They don't put it on the front page.

In any case. Good luck with your search.

DWRZ
May 13th, 2009, 12:31 PM
They do have it. I setup a client with it. You just have to call them for it. They don't put it on the front page.

In any case. Good luck with your search.


My bad. I'll check them out. Layered tech looks good too!

ukripper
May 13th, 2009, 01:21 PM
What is the difference between normal and dedicated web host, just wondering..?

JohnFH
May 13th, 2009, 01:32 PM
What is the difference between normal and dedicated web host, just wondering..?

Hosting your site on a dedicated web server means you don't share that server with any other site. That leaves you with more control over the hardware and server administration.

Corelogik
May 13th, 2009, 01:34 PM
What is the difference between normal and dedicated web host, just wondering..?

Basically with shared hosting you share the machine with other companies/entities. You each have a directory that's all yours but the system resources, CPU, HDD etc, are shared. Normally you share an IP range as well.

Dedicated hosting typically costs more because your paying for use of the whole machine by yourself. The entire CPU, HDD etc is all yours and may or may not include a static IP address, depending on the package you pay for.

Shared hosting is sufficient for 90% of what a typical user will do. Companies and more specialized/dedicated content and content creators, prefer the additional resources and usually bandwidth of dedicated hosting.

ukripper
May 13th, 2009, 03:18 PM
Thanks guys for explanation of dedicated web hosting. i was thinking to host my website at home. But i think if i get good deal on dedicated services I may switch to them. i have to workout which is cheaper dedicated or home hosting.

DWRZ
May 13th, 2009, 05:58 PM
Yeah, I'm in a similar fix. I have hardware knowledge but otherwise no knowledge whatsoever about setting up, administering, and securing a webspace at home. That said, I do plan to look at the cost of a line and hardware, since in general I don't like to depend on others for services-- especially if they don't do their business well. The day when hosting from home becomes easy and accessible-- that will be when the internet revolution will really start. Yeah, right now we have blogs and social networking, shared hosting. At the end of the day, though, if someone doesn't like your stuff, it will go out. When you're on your own line and hardware is when you're really free.

JohnFH
May 13th, 2009, 06:19 PM
The day when hosting from home becomes easy and accessible-- that will be when the internet revolution will really start.

That day is already here. However the problem is not in setting up a home server, but in the speed of the internet connection. Unless you have a leased line at home (VERY unlikely) then your up connection speed becomes the bottleneck as it will be much slower than your download speed. Hosting your site at home will mean your site will be extremely slow especially when more than 2 people try to access it.

It's not really a better plan anyway (to say the least), since now you are dependent on your electricity company, your ISP, and your skills in adminstering a webserver as well as your availability to fix any problems immediately. I prefer to spend 30 a year and not have any of those disadvantages.

hessiess
May 13th, 2009, 06:44 PM
The day when hosting from home becomes easy and accessible.
It already is easy to do, the problem is the cost of the electricity and ADSL internet connections which provide a much faster download than upload speed, making the end user experience painfully slow. I run a Web server for toasting bits and peaces before uploading them to my shared hosting provider(mainly fixing XHTML errors) and a subversion server for data storage. In the latter case fast downloads are actually an advantage as it makes remote commits rilly fast, but remote checkouts can be slow.