PDA

View Full Version : [ubuntu] update error



Rambleon
May 11th, 2009, 02:42 PM
Hi, I have tried to update my Ubuntu installation but get the following error message. Can you please provide a simple step by step instruction of what to do fro a complete novice to Ubuntu. thanks E: dpkg was interrupted, you must manually run 'dpkg --configure -a' to correct the problem.
E: _cache->open() failed, please report.

pro003
May 11th, 2009, 02:45 PM
Hi, I have tried to update my Ubuntu installation but get the following error message. Can you please provide a simple step by step instruction of what to do fro a complete novice to Ubuntu. thanks E: dpkg was interrupted, you must manually run 'dpkg --configure -a' to correct the problem.
E: _cache->open() failed, please report.


it's just like the error message said, run dpkg --configure -a
in terminal, it should fix the problem... and type sudo before you entering such commands...

Partyboi2
May 11th, 2009, 02:46 PM
Hi, open a terminal (Applications>Accessories>Terminal) and type or paste

sudo dpkg --configure -a

Rambleon
May 11th, 2009, 08:13 PM
thanks for the advice. I have run the command as directed but stop part way through with the message,
gzip: stdout: no space left on device
update-initramfs: failed for /boot/initrd.img-2.6.24-generic
dpkg: subprocess post-installation script returned error exit status1

what next please ??

Partyboi2
May 12th, 2009, 02:21 AM
Can you open a terminal and post the output to

df -h

Rambleon
May 12th, 2009, 01:31 PM
Hi Partyboi2
have entered the code to terminal as requested and the output is

Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/sda6 31G 3.0G 27G 10% /
varrun 379M 104K 379M 1% /var/run
varlock 379M 0 379M 0% /var/lock
udev 379M 56K 379M 1% /dev
devshm 379M 12K 379M 1% /dev/shm
/dev/sda3 46M 40M 3.8M 92% /boot
/dev/sda1 22G 11G 11G 50% /media/sda1
/dev/sda2 22G 4.2G 18G 20% /media/sda2

Partyboi2
May 12th, 2009, 01:36 PM
You need to free up some room, open up Synaptic Package Manager and search for "linux-image" and remove all the ones you do not need except keep your current one and another one as a backup. Once you have made some room you can run

sudo dpkg --configure -aIf you still do not have enough space you will need to increase the size of sda3

Rambleon
May 12th, 2009, 04:31 PM
Hi Partyboi2,

would love to try your solution but synaptic package manager will only open as faded out with the original error message. ?

pro003
May 12th, 2009, 08:42 PM
you can free up some space by typing in terminal:



sudo aptitude autoremove
sudo aptitude clean

but can't tell you is it going to be enough...

Rambleon
May 13th, 2009, 07:55 PM
hi Pro 003

I have tried your suggestion.
Running aptitude autoremove gives a list of actions and options but says " This aptitude does not have Super Cow Powers"
running aptitude clean has no effect on sda3 size.
Any more suggestions gratefully received.

pro003
May 13th, 2009, 08:17 PM
sudo aptitude autoremove

> removes obsolete packages / installations


sudo apt-get clean

> clears the cache

... and both commands should give you some free space.

And if you have nerves to read this take a look how can you resize your ext3 partition without losing your data.

http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=105255

Rambleon
May 13th, 2009, 09:10 PM
Hi pro003

as before autoremove dosnt seem to run. apt-get has no effect on the sda3 size so I guess its down to resizing the partition. Wish me luck

Kevbert
May 13th, 2009, 09:41 PM
To clean out some image files go to Applications-Accessories-Terminal and type in the following:

uname -r
- this will give you the currently running linux kernel.
Next enter

cd /boot
ls -l
This will list all available kernels (which probably show up in your grub boot menu).
If you have any .bak files remove them with

sudo rm *.bak
Be careful with this as if you enter the command wrong you may kill your operating system.
Now you can remove some old kernels, but not the one displayed by uname -r with

sudo rm abi-2.6.24-22-generic
sudo rm config-2.6.24-22-generic
sudo rm initrd.img-2.6.24-22-generic
sudo rm System.map-2.6.24-22-generic
sudo rm vmlinuz-2.6.24-22-generic
If you've already removed some bak files you shouldn't need to remove any other old kernels by this method. The actual kernel number is just an old example. If you need to remove an old kernel this way you'll need to edit your /boot/grub/menu.lst file. With just bak files removed you should be able to remove some old kernels with Synaptic (see previous posts) and this will automatically sort out your menu.lst file for you. It's best to keep the latest and the previous kernel (in case of problems).

Rambleon
May 14th, 2009, 10:22 AM
thanks Kevbert, and all the rest of you. removed .bak fils as directed now only 59% on sda3 and working fine with out the need ot resize.

Kevbert
May 14th, 2009, 11:31 AM
thanks Kevbert, and all the rest of you. removed .bak fils as directed now only 59% on sda3 and working fine with out the need ot resize.

It may still be worth removing any old kernels that you're unlikely to use via Synaptic. Just search for linux-image and completely remove the generic one's that are obsolete (but not the one you're using). ;)