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jakupl
May 7th, 2009, 01:39 PM
What do you think about the traditional African Ubuntu philosophy? We can all agree on that it would make the world a better place if every one thought in this way, but does it work in practice?
When we think of Gnu/Linux/ Ubuntu, it does not work completely as it should. Not everyone knows how to code, and therefore not everyone can contribute and help others out.
Here is a nice video of what ubuntu actually is: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zf4hP3GkABI (and no. it is not the one with nelson mandela)

Is the Ubuntu philosophy even compatible with the software world?

chucky chuckaluck
May 7th, 2009, 02:05 PM
i think naming the os 'ubuntu' is more of a tribute to the ideal, just as 'freedom franks' is a tribute to that ideal and not a real attempt to bring personal power to all who eat their hot dogs.

jakupl
May 7th, 2009, 02:47 PM
i think naming the os 'ubuntu' is more of a tribute to the ideal, just as 'freedom franks' is a tribute to that ideal and not a real attempt to bring personal power to all who eat their hot dogs.

I disagree. Isn't the whole idea of ubuntu to implement the ubuntu philosophy to the actual os?

Language
May 7th, 2009, 03:48 PM
i think naming the os 'ubuntu' is more of a tribute to the ideal, just as 'freedom franks' is a tribute to that ideal and not a real attempt to bring personal power to all who eat their hot dogs.

I certainly feel more powerful after enjoying a Freedom Frank! :)

monsterstack
May 7th, 2009, 04:56 PM
I think this whole concept is so important I'm just going to go right ahead and print it out in giant letters:



I am what I am because of who we all are.

All the things that we achieve as individuals, or as a community, are wholly dependent on this single inalienable fact. We live in age of instantaneous communication across the entire globe, free exchange of ideas, massive collaboration, and all of its associated benefits. To paraphrase John of Salisbury (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_of_Salisbury) [wikipedia.org], we can see more and we can see further than our ancestors did not because our sight is better or because we are taller than they were, but because they raise us up, as if we are standing on the shoulders of giants.

Free and open-source software of the use and quality we have today would not exist without this principle. Many people certainly don't know how to code, but can you imagine what using GNU/Linux would be like if it had been entirely written by Stallman or Torvalds and not a single other? If that's a bit overboard, then do you think that Ubuntu would still have the same success it has today if the active developers never bothered to listen to the community on any issue of importance? Of course you don't; no one thinks this.

Firestem4
May 7th, 2009, 04:56 PM
From the Ubuntu website:

What does Ubuntu mean?

Ubuntu is an African word meaning 'Humanity to others', or 'I am what I am because of who we all are'. The Ubuntu distribution brings the spirit of Ubuntu to the software world.

lovinglinux
May 7th, 2009, 07:39 PM
When we think of Gnu/Linux/ Ubuntu, it does not work completely as it should. Not everyone knows how to code, and therefore not everyone can contribute and help others out.

I STRONGLY DISAGREE with this statement. You don't have to know how to code to contribute. Helping to solve problems or asking questions in the forums for example is far more important than you realize. For example, when I first started to use Linux 8 months ago I knew nothing about command-line, shell scripts or bash. I started to use the terminal to install things and solve problems, then I realized I could do a lot of stuff from terminal, then I learned about scripts and had an idea. Three months later I was releasing my first Firefox extension (http://fmc.isgreat.org) (Linux only) using bash scripts, xul and a little bit of Javascript. Is not a super complex application, but it is something new. I had to put a lot of thinking into it, but if it wasn't this community and the exchange of knowledge, I would never do it. I would never imagined it would be possible to do it with relatively simple scripts. I also would never complete it in 3 months.

Several times during the development of the extension I came to the forum with very specific questions in mind and found they were already answered on threads dealing with different objectives and contexts. Sometimes when you ask something that you need to go from A to B, someone will answer with a concept that can be applied to make a jump from C to E. Exchange of ideas is a powerfull tool.

I do not consider myself a programmer and I have a very limited knowledge about shell scripting, but with some determination, a lot of reading and the help from the community, everything is possible.

chucky chuckaluck
May 7th, 2009, 07:42 PM
I disagree. Isn't the whole idea of ubuntu to implement the ubuntu philosophy to the actual os?

in contrast with all the other cold and inhuman distros?

jakupl
May 7th, 2009, 07:58 PM
we can see more and we can see further than our ancestors did not because our sight is better or because we are taller than they were, but because they raise us up, as if we are standing on the shoulders of giants.

well said.


I STRONGLY DISAGREE with this statement. You don't have to know how to code to contribute. Helping to solve problems or asking questions in the forums for example is far more important than you realize. For example, when I first started to use Linux 8 months ago I knew nothing about command-line, shell scripts or bash. I started to use the terminal to install things and solve problems, then I realized I could do a lot of stuff from terminal, then I learned about scripts and had an idea. Three months later I was releasing my first Firefox extension (http://fmc.isgreat.org) (Linux only) using bash scripts, xul and a little bit of Javascript. Is not a super complex application, but it is something new. I had to put a lot of thinking into it, but if it wasn't this community and the exchange of knowledge, I would never do it. I would never imagined it would be possible to do it with relatively simple scripts. I also would never complete it in 3 months.

Several times during the development of the extension I came to the forum with very specific questions in mind and found they were already answered on threads dealing with different objectives and contexts. Sometimes when you ask something that you need to go from A to B, someone will answer with a concept that can be applied to make a jump from C to E. Exchange of ideas is a powerfull tool.

I do not consider myself a programmer and I have a very limited knowledge about shell scripting, but with some determination, a lot of reading and the help from the community, everything is possible.

I agree, and I have almost exactly the same story as you, but I still do not feel that I am giving the same amount of help as I am getting from the community.
The problem is that, it is much easier for poor Zulus in Africa to help each other... well not easier but it takes no prior knowledge to do this. They give each other shelter and food. They don't help each other in programming.

I have installed Ubuntu on 6 other peoples computer, and they use it exclusively, but nobody actually contributes anything. Most of them don't even use the forums when they are experiencing difficulties, even when I tell them to. Sure they have the possibility to, and that is great, but they don't.


in contrast with all the other cold and inhuman distros?

LOL no.

Dngrsone
May 7th, 2009, 07:58 PM
I STRONGLY DISAGREE with this statement. You don't have to know how to code to contribute. Helping to solve problems or asking questions in the forums for example is far more important than you realize. For example, when I first started to use Linux 8 months ago I knew nothing about command-line, shell scripts or bash. I started to use the terminal to install things and solve problems, then I realized I could do a lot of stuff from terminal, then I learned about scripts and had an idea. Three months later I was releasing my first Firefox extension (http://fmc.isgreat.org) (Linux only) using bash scripts, xul and a little bit of Javascript. Is not a super complex application, but it is something new. I had to put a lot of thinking into it, but if it wasn't this community and the exchange of knowledge, I would never do it. I would never imagined it would be possible to do it with relatively simple scripts. I also would never complete it in 3 months.

Several times during the development of the extension I came to the forum with very specific questions in mind and found they were already answered on threads dealing with different objectives and contexts. Sometimes when you ask something that you need to go from A to B, someone will answer with a concept that can be applied to make a jump from C to E. Exchange of ideas is a powerfull tool.

I do not consider myself a programmer and I have a very limited knowledge about shell scripting, but with some determination, a lot of reading and the help from the community, everything is possible.

To expand on this, there are other, non-coding niches to be filled. I know how to program but I am not a programmer. But even if I didn't know how to code I can still answer questions in these forums. I am also a hardware specialist-- the OS is nothing without the hardware to run it on, and there is a need for people who can diagnose an repair hard systems.