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View Full Version : What does Ubuntu contribue to the linux community?



GnomeFoot
March 26th, 2009, 07:55 PM
Just a thought, tho Im really no big Gnu/linux-genious or something, but Ive heard that both OpenSuse/Novell and Fedora/Redhat contribute a great deal to the Linux community, with SELinux and Cambridge (heard about more things but not sure what)

What is Ubuntu giving to the other distros, to the community?


Dont get me wrong, I love ubuntu, my Dist of choice!

_Pipo_
March 26th, 2009, 08:08 PM
I think Canonical's contribution is less important than Red Hat's or Novell's, as those two companies are much bigger than Canonical (and thus have much more money). That said, everything that Canonical, which isn't self-sufficient yet does is contributing to free software, so i don't think it would be fair to criticize them about that.

23meg
March 26th, 2009, 08:14 PM
https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Website/Content/UbuntuContributions may give you an idea.

(This is a page meant for collecting data; it's not an exhaustive list.)

andrewsomething
March 26th, 2009, 08:31 PM
Well, this is a pretty heated debate. First of all, it needs to be recognized that Canonical has far fewer employees and has a smaller operating budget than either Novel or Red Hat.

One point of contention has been the relationship between Debian and Ubuntu. Earlier, many involved with Debian felt that it was very one sided, but this has been worked on very much more recently. Many Ubuntu developers also contribute directly to Debian. I personally maintain a few packages in Debian and try to push as many patches back to Debian as possible or when possible fix the issue in Debian directly. The mono transition during the Jaunty dev cycle is a good example of Debian and Ubuntu working together, and hopefully the work done transitioning Ubuntu to python 2.6 will be useful when Debian makes this transition. Also, the distro specific work done by Ubuntu is inherited by many derivatives like Mint.

Ubuntu work pretty closely with upstream GNOME as well, pushing back patches, testing developmental versions and forwarding bugs.

Usplash and Upstart were created by Ubuntu/Canonical.

I personally think that the biggest contributions that Canonical has made to the larger community are Bazaar and Launchpad. While, many git user would disagree, I think Bazaar is the best DVCS availiable. Launchpad will be fully open sourced very soon, bug large parts of it are already open like Storm, the object-relational mapper for Python. Further more, Launchpad already provides hosting to thousands of open source projects. I personally believe Launchpad is the best option for integrated code hosting/bug tracking/specification tracking/ect... out there.

I'm sure there's a lot more.

z.s.tar.gz
March 26th, 2009, 09:05 PM
The biggest thing Ubuntu has contributed is a means for anyone to use linux without having to learn about how it works.

Sealbhach
March 26th, 2009, 09:07 PM
Mostly, most important thing, new users, like me (and that girl who dropped out of college).


.

Daveski
March 27th, 2009, 01:14 AM
Mostly, most important thing, new users, like me (and that girl who dropped out of college).
.

+1
The single biggest contribution has to be the leaps forward in 'getting-Linux-out-there'. There were, and will be, others, but Ubuntu pops up in many of my Google searches for general computer terms these days.

Simple popularity is a major contribution. I know that sometimes it seems like there aren't any other distro's out there, but as some people become comfortable with Ubuntu, they consider dipping their toes in alternatives.

swoll1980
March 27th, 2009, 01:30 AM
Users!

gnomeuser
March 27th, 2009, 05:24 AM
Launchpad will be fully open sourced very soon, bug large parts of it are already open like Storm, the object-relational mapper for Python.

Inaccurate, Soyuz the build system part of Launchpad will remain proprietary. Also while not technically a part of Launchpad, Landscape will not be liberated either.

Rokurosv
March 27th, 2009, 06:04 AM
New users, that's the biggest thing I think Ubuntu brings to the table.

wolfen69
March 27th, 2009, 06:17 AM
if nothing else, ubuntu contributes users. let's face it, ever since ubuntu came onto the scene, there's a hell of a lot more newbs/linux users around.

and a lot of those people move on to other distros. it's linux, it's all good.

Lunx
March 27th, 2009, 06:30 AM
Yep, I'm another to agree the best contribution Ubuntu make is to introduce new users to Linux (based on my personal opinion and experience as a newbie). When I first decided to give Linux a try and was looking at a distro, Ubuntu kept getting thrown up so often as being a very good place to start.

bigbrovar
March 27th, 2009, 07:38 AM
Redhat, Novel (no matter how much we may hate them) Mandriva and Debian are Giants on the linux world when it comes to the amount of contribution they contribute back upstream. There have also been in the linux business long before before came to the scene. Having said that i think ubuntu biggest contribution to Linux is in MS word (The Good MS) is being the glue that makes everything gel. non of the above mentioned linux distros focuses on the ordinary user. but ubuntu from day has also focussed on the end user desktop usage making linux easy to use. hence it has brought lost of momentum to the linux community. lots of users would still be in the windows world were it not for the embracive and nooby friendly nature of ubuntu. many of this users have now gone on to become developers and server as a bed rock for a solid Linux crowd.

ssam
March 27th, 2009, 11:39 AM
testing
according to popcon.ubuntu.com about 3900 people have kernel 2.6.28 installed. that means they are probably running jaunty. (i am sure most users dont have statistics enabled in their system->admin->software sources) so i'd guess there are 5000 to 10000 people who run the testing versions of ubuntu (probably many more after the beta).

thats a lot of people runing dev versions of software and finding bugs.

pt123
March 27th, 2009, 11:50 AM
Users which in turn ends up bringing better hardware support for Linux.

porchrat
March 27th, 2009, 11:56 AM
Ubuntu brings muffins to the meetings :P

jimi_hendrix
March 27th, 2009, 12:29 PM
we provide converts with a beginner friendly distro so they dont pick arch and start screaming when they botch the install and lose their windows partition

JackieChan
March 27th, 2009, 12:43 PM
Well, this is a pretty heated debate. First of all, it needs to be recognized that Canonical has far fewer employees and has a smaller operating budget than either Novel or Red Hat.

One point of contention has been the relationship between Debian and Ubuntu. Earlier, many involved with Debian felt that it was very one sided, but this has been worked on very much more recently. Many Ubuntu developers also contribute directly to Debian. I personally maintain a few packages in Debian and try to push as many patches back to Debian as possible or when possible fix the issue in Debian directly. The mono transition during the Jaunty dev cycle is a good example of Debian and Ubuntu working together, and hopefully the work done transitioning Ubuntu to python 2.6 will be useful when Debian makes this transition. Also, the distro specific work done by Ubuntu is inherited by many derivatives like Mint.

Ubuntu work pretty closely with upstream GNOME as well, pushing back patches, testing developmental versions and forwarding bugs.

Usplash and Upstart were created by Ubuntu/Canonical.

I personally think that the biggest contributions that Canonical has made to the larger community are Bazaar and Launchpad. While, many git user would disagree, I think Bazaar is the best DVCS availiable. Launchpad will be fully open sourced very soon, bug large parts of it are already open like Storm, the object-relational mapper for Python. Further more, Launchpad already provides hosting to thousands of open source projects. I personally believe Launchpad is the best option for integrated code hosting/bug tracking/specification tracking/ect... out there.

I'm sure there's a lot more.
Very interesting read.