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sreeyeshns
March 19th, 2009, 05:41 PM
I'm an engineering student(Electronics and communication). I am very much interested in programing and software development. I know the basics of C, C#, Java. I want to enter the world of application programing(For linux) and to contribute to open source. So where should i go from here? Should I learn any other languages? Waiting for reply from experts...

Sinkingships7
March 19th, 2009, 06:20 PM
I'm an engineering student(Electronics and communication). I am very much interested in programing and software development. I know the basics of C, C#, Java. I want to enter the world of application programing(For linux) and to contribute to open source. So where should i go from here? Should I learn any other languages? Waiting for reply from experts...

You should learn many languages at some point. Programming, of course, is a never-ending learning experience. If your main goal is to contribute to open source and program for fun (not obtain a job in software development) then you're going to want to know Python and perhaps C at the very least. Those languages seem to be the most commonly used among Linux developers.

Also, make sure that you learn how to program, and not just a programming language. If you'd like me to elaborate, just ask.

dwhitney67
March 19th, 2009, 06:26 PM
If I were you, I would set your goal a little higher... repeat the following:

"I want to enter the world of application programming (For linux) and make money while at it."

The best way to learn to develop software is to do it day-in/day-out. You might as well earn a salary while doing it. For some people, this is easier said than done.

I work as a s/w engineer, and on occasion I contribute my knowledge to those seeking help on programming forums. This is the extent of my contributions to the Linux community, and I am content with my efforts.

The best thing to do is to get a good grasp of one or more languages and the capabilities each offers, and then decide on whether you want to start a project on your own, or if you prefer to support an existing project.

For the latter, the help most sought after is for s/w testers, and/or perhaps peer reviewers. For me, this is not a interesting choice, thus I have never considered doing it. You may feel differently.

Good luck with whatever path you choose.

jimi_hendrix
March 19th, 2009, 08:19 PM
You should learn many languages at some point. Programming, of course, is a never-ending learning experience. If you're main goal is to contribute to open source and program for fun (not obtain a job in software development) then you're going to want to know Python and perhaps C at the very least. Those languages seem to be the most commonly used among Linux developers.

Also, make sure that you learn how to program, and not just a programming language. If you'd like me to elaborate, just ask.

+1

might as well pick up a GUI toolkit on your way...since you know C#, there is GTK# and such

shadylookin
March 19th, 2009, 10:12 PM
depending on how well you actually know those languages you can pretty much do whatever you fancy. C, C#, and java are all very popular languages and if you can't find a project you're interested in working on you can always start your own. I don't think you really need to learn another language unless you really want to(knowing how to program is more important than the specific language).

I think the real question is what interests you? Once you have that answer pursue it.

jimi_hendrix
March 19th, 2009, 11:58 PM
i normally go to

http://www.sourceforge.net/people

when i am looking for a project

sreeyeshns
March 20th, 2009, 03:04 PM
You should learn many languages at some point. Programming, of course, is a never-ending learning experience. If your main goal is to contribute to open source and program for fun (not obtain a job in software development) then you're going to want to know Python and perhaps C at the very least. Those languages seem to be the most commonly used among Linux developers.

Also, make sure that you learn how to program, and not just a programming language. If you'd like me to elaborate, just ask.
I belive the best way to become a good programmer is to involve in some project. But I have only the basics of these languages. I want to become an expert in one of these language(I prefer C with some gui tools). The problem is how should I raise myself to that level. What should I do next? From where can I learn advanced application level programming?

jimi_hendrix
March 20th, 2009, 03:12 PM
I belive the best way to become a good programmer is to involve in some project. But I have only the basics of these languages. I want to become an expert in one of these language(I prefer C with some gui tools). The problem is how should I raise myself to that level. What should I do next? From where can I learn advanced application level programming?

what intrests you (i can give you advice when you answer)

sreeyeshns
March 20th, 2009, 04:43 PM
what intrests you (i can give you advice when you answer)
I'm actually interested in developing applications for linux in C.

hessiess
March 20th, 2009, 05:13 PM
I'm actually interested in developing applications for linux in C.

Spasifically what kinds of apps are you interested in developing? Productivity applications i.e. Openoffice, graphics i.e. GIMP, Games, front-ends, emulators, libuerys, device drivers and kernel related stuff...

sreeyeshns
March 20th, 2009, 05:22 PM
Spasifically what kinds of apps are you interested in developing? Productivity applications i.e. Openoffice, graphics i.e. GIMP, Games, front-ends, emulators, libuerys, device drivers and kernel related stuff...
Actually I'm interested in every type of applications you mensioned except game programming. But I've special interest in developing driver applications and productivity applications