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View Full Version : Hey, Guitar players help me?



Dekkon
March 11th, 2009, 02:20 AM
I've been wanting to play Guitar for about a year now, but been stuck on the Guitar I want. My budget is about $400 for the Guitar and Amp(With cables and such).

I have this problem, I like to "Go big, or Go Home", which brings me to this next point. I hate Squires, and I refuse to buy one, but a fender strat on the other hand is more then fine.

I want to play:

Classic Rock(Led Zeppelin, AC/DC, Fleetwood Mac, Pink Floyd)
Alternative
Metal(Little)
Blues(Little)
and every other genre of Rock. :)

Can anyone suggest a Guitar, I'm big on looks, but not too big, just a nice Guitar is what I want.

The Titan
March 11th, 2009, 03:29 AM
fender strat on the other hand is more then fine.

Do you have a strat? That's what I learned on and I loved it. If that is what you are looking for you could probably find a used one with an amp and cables for about your budget. But i'm not sure I have not bought a guitar in a long time.

Anyways, hope I helped

swoll1980
March 11th, 2009, 03:44 AM
I would recommend an acoustic to learn on, builds finger strength, and will let you know for sure if your messing up. You get all that dirt from an electric it's harder for a beginner to hear the mistakes.

Chemical Imbalance
March 11th, 2009, 03:46 AM
I also recommend a Strat (the mexican-mades are cheaper than the american ones). Squires really aren't that different from the Strats though...

My first electric guitar was a Cherry Strat I got back in '99. Still works great!

Swagman
March 11th, 2009, 04:22 AM
I'll second the acoustic choice

but.. if you must electrify it then..

Ibanez or a BC Rich Bitch

hoopz23
March 11th, 2009, 04:57 AM
i agree with the acoustic guitar choice if you're just starting to learn to play

Firestem4
March 11th, 2009, 05:06 AM
Persnoally I hate the feel of Fender guitars (The neck scale is uncomfortable for me to play with)

I had a Squire Strat when i first tried a guitar 7 years ago. (The strat pack is a great gguitar for those who aren't sure if they'll even like playing guitar because its not tha big of an expense.)

Acoustics are a great choice for beginners because it will help to build your finger strenght, and because the necks on acoustics are wider It will be easier for you to make your way around a fretboard and do chords etc.

If you want to go the electric route. Check craigs list, the outlet/used on Guitar Center etc.

Dean Guitars are also a great alternative for low-end guitars.

Good luck.

cmay
March 11th, 2009, 05:09 AM
i started to learn playing guitar when i was 14 on a old electrical guitar and a nylon stringed one i could borrow from one of the teachers. i think it does not matter one bit what gutar you learn to play on ohter than if you quit then you might be better off with a cheap one to start with.

i got my first guitar a while later which was the electric guitar i used to borrow and later when i was able to earn money for myself i went out an got my own guitar. i also knew i would never quit so i just got the best one i could afford right from the start. i still miss the kramer i once had a couple of years later and today i play acoustic and have a old busted up epiphone acoustic. i never had a guitar that cost that much and i always have been playing so its just go for the ones that sounds good.

Firestem4
March 11th, 2009, 05:18 AM
I agree with what cmay says. So long as you are into playing the guitar can be a peice of crap. Its still a guitar. One of the teacers at the place I worked at, his first guitar was an awful used Ibanez and the action was about an inch off the guitar. And I complained about my Squire strat! Lol.

I did stop playing guitar about 6 monnths after I got my first gutiar. So, the fact that I didn't blow $1,000 on my first guitar/amp, it was a good thing... When i started playing again a year and a half ago I finally got myself a guitar that was comfortable to play.

Trust me though I know how you feel. I like to go big also. Sometimes you don't have to. (Especially with guitars. If you ever have the money and want to get another guitar dont waste your money on 2 thousand dollar guitars. There are guitar makers that make the same quality guitars without the insane markup price. www.traditionguitars.com is one of those. Though they haven't updated their online catalog they have a few really nice guitars as of 2008)

Find a small-time retailer (local guitar shop) And you'll find nice guitars for good prices.

RiceMonster
March 11th, 2009, 05:21 AM
I started playing on my Dad's acoustic guitar, then six months later I got my own, which was a washburn. I still have it; it's a piece of crap, but I learned a lot on it. Still, I also recommend learning on acoustic to build calluses.


I'll second the acoustic choice

but.. if you must electrify it then..

Ibanez or a BC Rich Bitch

Eck BC Rich? No way. So many beginners buy those because they think they look cool. I really can't stand them, that cool design is all they have going for them, IMO. Ibanez makes some pretty good guitars, and they're often affordable.

e2k
March 11th, 2009, 08:42 AM
For a first guitar I'd recommend something like the Yamaha pacifica 112, excellent value for the price! Still have mine after years of playing.. :cool:

Sand & Mercury
March 11th, 2009, 10:05 AM
I'll second the acoustic choice

but.. if you must electrify it then..

Ibanez or a BC Rich Bitch
I have a BC Rich and love it (Warlock), but it's a bit much for classic rock :lol: They do have other models that would suit, though.

I definitely recommend an Ibanez.

Also, don't let yourself be limited by your budget. What you are making is an investment. If you take good care of it, your guitar will serve you for the rest of your days, so if you get the best you can straight off, you'll never feel the need to 'upgrade'.

Acoustic is as stated the best way to go if you really want to knuckle down and learn to play well, but you'll probably want an electric too. Really, they're entirely different ways of playing because you apply different kinds of pressure when you're using them. Besides, acoustic's good for practice but sometimes you just wanna rock out. :P

chucky chuckaluck
March 11th, 2009, 10:11 AM
learn on a cheap acoustic. if you make it past the novelty stage, you'll be in a minority.

m0ntels
March 12th, 2009, 05:52 PM
I've been playing guitar for about 2 years now and it still sounds like I've been only playing for 2 weeks, so understand I'm not trying to be rude with my advice here.

First off, the "go big or go home" attitude you said you had... If you have that attitude going into playing, I think you should reconsider starting. Even used, $400 won't buy you anything that great, especially if that's all you have for a guitar, amp, strings, tuner, cables, and a case or stand. Also, that kind of attitude I think would have you quitting in short order if you aren't used to playing a stringed instrument, and you'd have just wasted your $400 on something that you could have spent on something you'd be happier with.

Now, if you can set aside the above things, go to a guitar store. Ask if you can play a few guitars you like. One that feels right is much better than one that looks right. You'll know when you hold it if it feels right. Necks come in all shapes, sizes and thicknesses, as do the frets themselves. All guitars sound different also because of what they are made of and what parts they have on them.

Once you've found one that looks, feels, and sounds good, go watch Craigslist and find a used one. You'll save much money, which is good, and if you end up quitting, you're out less.

If you get an electric, you might want to learn to play for a while before you buy an amp. If you stick with things, eventually you'll want a tube amp, and there aren't too many under your current budget.

The most important advice is save up to buy what you really want. If you have gear you want, you'll stick with the hobby longer and won't keep losing money buying and selling gear. Second most important advice is make friends with someone who is an experienced player. They can help you with setting up and maintaining equipment, let you borrow things that you can't afford, and keep you from buying junk.

My current rig is a Washburn A-20 through a Laney VC-30 with a Zoom multi effects pedal and 2 Boss pedals. I can play any kind of music with that setup, and it ran me about $1200. Realistically $1000 is probably a fair average price for a beginning electric guitar player to buy good used equipment.

Like I said, I mean no disrespect, just trying to give honest advice. I hope some of this is helpful to you.

spaceship
March 12th, 2009, 10:38 PM
Honestly, stay away from Fenders unless you can shell out a pretty penny for a nice American one. I like Fenders but G&L guitars are the best guitars for the buck for people looking for Fender guitars at a bargain and better quality. G&L stands for George Fullerton and Leo Fender. Leo started G&L after his stint at Music Man and believe me, G&L's are much better "Fenders" than Fenders are themselves. Check out


http://glguitars.com (http://glguitars.com)


Anyways, G&L has the Tribute series made in Indonesia which are far better guitars than Squiers and many mexican Fenders. US parts and pickups assembled in Indonesia. This "strat" below can be had at $399 from Buffalo Bros Guitars, and believe me this will blow your Squiers and mex strats to mars.

http://www.buffalobrosguitars.com/images28000-28999/ugb28406-g&ls500/index.html

As far as amps go, I would just stick with a cheaper solid state amp like a Roland Cube until you start taking things seriously, than you can pickup a nice tube amp.

Ascenti0n
March 12th, 2009, 11:17 PM
learn on a cheap acoustic. if you make it past the novelty stage, you'll be in a minority.

I agree with this statement, apart from the minority part.

If you've never played before, you will not appreciate an expensive guitar, even if you have more money than sense.

Simply get the best you can afford. Either Acoustic or Electric, depending on your taste in music. Obviously the acoustic has the advantage you don't need an amp a somewhere to plug in to hear what you are playing.

forrestcupp
March 13th, 2009, 12:46 AM
For $400 there's no way you can "go big or go home". Just get that out of your head, and you'll do just fine with a $400 guitar. If you want a strat, you'll probably have to get a Squier for that price.

steveneddy
July 2nd, 2010, 04:31 AM
I've been wanting to play Guitar for about a year now, but been stuck on the Guitar I want. My budget is about $400 for the Guitar and Amp(With cables and such).

I have this problem, I like to "Go big, or Go Home", which brings me to this next point. I hate Squires, and I refuse to buy one, but a fender strat on the other hand is more then fine.

I want to play:

Classic Rock(Led Zeppelin, AC/DC, Fleetwood Mac, Pink Floyd)
Alternative
Metal(Little)
Blues(Little)
and every other genre of Rock. :)

Can anyone suggest a Guitar, I'm big on looks, but not too big, just a nice Guitar is what I want.

Just go to Guitar Center and buy the Strat with Amp package and simply learn to play.

Once you get good you can invest in a better instrument.

Xianath
July 2nd, 2010, 07:28 AM
Not sure why you would hate Squiers if you'vre just starting to play. They make for a good first guitar considering the price/features ratio. I have a Squier Stagemaster HSH. Reverse headstock, Floyd Rose tremolo, 24 frets, HSH configuration. It took me several years to start feeling limited by it, at which point I upgraded the pickups to DiMarzio. A couple years ago I spent three days with a round file and sandpaper and now it also has a scalloped neck. For a $300 guitar (and that was ten years ago) it does what I want it to do, though I still can't do everything *it* can. Back it up with a USB guitar adapter and you'll have a starting rig that should last you for a year or two before you start feeling like an upgrade.

I'm sure other brands have similar offers that others have mentioned. Just wanted to share my Squier experience.

smellyman
July 2nd, 2010, 07:53 AM
My first guitar was a very cheap acoustic and I thought it sounded like crap. That is until a buddy came over and played it and it sounded beautiful. It was only me who sucked.

Point being a guitar really is a guitar until you get really good and can tell the difference. Buy a cheap to middle of the raod a coustic.

bigseb
July 2nd, 2010, 08:03 AM
My advice:

Try out all the different brands and find one that feels most comfortable for you. There are differences that can make a huge impact on how you play eg neck width, string spacing, fretboard camber, fret thickness and height, full scale or three quarter scale, materials used for neck fretboard and body, overall weight, type of pickups, the list goes on and on...

Playing music is art so there are no rules as to this guitar will get you that sound, or that guitar will get you another. Use what works for you. That said, Fender strats aren't popular for nothing. They are great all-rounders from blues, classic rock, country and even metal (think Malmsteen).

Let us know how you decide and good luck

steveneddy
July 2nd, 2010, 02:48 PM
I have this problem, I like to "Go big, or Go Home", which brings me to this next point. I hate Squires, and I refuse to buy one, but a fender strat on the other hand is more then fine.

The beginner guitar players always think that big expensive equipment will make you sound better.

I play semi-professionally and make good money playing a Squire Strat. I am a good player and have become very accomplished over the years. I can make a cigar box with strings sound good.

I also only use a 1962 Airline amp - all tube - only 5-8 watts output through an 8" speaker. I simply mic it up when I play and it sounds great. I push it into overdrive with a Boss OD-2 pedal, not so much for the distortion, just to push the tubes a litte during a lead.

So there you go. Squire Strat and a cheap, ancient tube amp for a player of 35 or so years. Surely a Squire is good enough for a beginner player.

RiceMonster
July 2nd, 2010, 02:53 PM
For $400 there's no way you can "go big or go home". Just get that out of your head, and you'll do just fine with a $400 guitar. If you want a strat, you'll probably have to get a Squier for that price.

I tend to agree. I think people get too caught up in brand names. "I need a Fender Strat" or "I need a Gibson Les Paul". A good guitarist can sound good without buying the most expensive equipment. I even find you can buy a really nice guitar for around $500 if you forget about brand names.

steveneddy
July 2nd, 2010, 09:04 PM
I tend to agree. I think people get too caught up in brand names. "I need a Fender Strat" or "I need a Gibson Les Paul". A good guitarist can sound good without buying the most expensive equipment. I even find you can buy a really nice guitar for around $500 if you forget about brand names.

That Fender Strat and amp at Guitar center is less than $300 here. That is a great beginner guitar players package.

There are three on guitar center's web site - two under $300 and one at $350. And those are nice amps for a beginner.

wilee-nilee
July 2nd, 2010, 09:36 PM
@steveneddy, your now the king necromancer, anything guitar and it's hard to not respond eh. Put down the guitar and back away slowly.:P

Just giving you a hard time, music is a great thing, no matter what instrument a person plays or if they are just a listener.

kamaboko
July 2nd, 2010, 09:50 PM
Don't drop a lot of money on a guitar until you've played for a few years and 'know' you're going to stick with it. My first guitar was a Hondo Les Paul copy. Cheap as cheap can get, but I stuck with it for about a year and progressed my way up to better guitars. This is what I have now, and am considering another. Also, when you've played for a number of years you'll be able to tell a great guitar from an OK one to a piece of junk; not always dependent on price.

1981 Fender Strat w/Floyd Rose
1981 Gibson Explorer E2

http://i168.photobucket.com/albums/u166/marpibeach/MyStrat.jpg

http://i168.photobucket.com/albums/u166/marpibeach/GIt1.jpg

Frogs Hair
July 2nd, 2010, 10:17 PM
Search guitar amp combo's in the $400.00 range , many companies sell starter packages.


(http://cooldiscountinsterments.com/shop/images/535446.jpg)

Zoot7
July 2nd, 2010, 11:11 PM
A good guitarist can sound good without buying the most expensive equipment.
And that there says it all! ;)

As for me myself I started off on a nylon string acoustic, then went on to a Yamaha starter kit whereby you get the guitar and amp cheap enough, I think 200 or so was what I payed for it.

steveneddy
July 3rd, 2010, 05:13 AM
@ kamaboko

Sweet Strat

kamaboko
July 3rd, 2010, 06:14 AM
@ kamaboko

Sweet Strat

Thanks. I've had the Strat since 84' and the Explorer since 81'. The Explorer is the "wall"; thick and punchy. The Strat is the "scalpel"; it just cuts through anything. lol. I'm considering a Carvin, but will still keep the Strat and Exp.

steveneddy
July 3rd, 2010, 04:02 PM
Thanks. I've had the Strat since 84' and the Explorer since 81'. The Explorer is the "wall"; thick and punchy. The Strat is the "scalpel"; it just cuts through anything. lol. I'm considering a Carvin, but will still keep the Strat and Exp.

I'm currently having built a custom guitar to replace a '74 Strat that I had to sell a few years back. Same color as yours but with a hardtail bridge.

Man I saw your guitar and tears came to my eyes.

Designing a custom headstock sticker for the new custom - check it out. This is merely a mock up printed on paper stuck to the headstock of one of my older guitars to check for size.