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xx.canes.rites
February 17th, 2009, 01:06 PM
Hello,(this is the part where you say hello back!)

My name is Canes. I have been authoring web documents for people to browse, for about 10 years. Now I have not been doing so professionally, I have been doing so on and off as a hobby or interest.

My problem today is that I have been lacking for the past few years and now I have no idea where to start. As of right now I am using gEdit instead of using WYSIWYG editors, because I want to exceed that of what the program offers.

My question today is as follows; What are the proper tools to use, for someone like me, to start building websites?

Also, what is the proper coding to make the best websites? I am using the HTML/CSS route right now. I want to maybe get into this whole XML business.

Is HTML better than XML, or is the latter better? CSS is a good way to stylize your coding, but what is the best method of coding for websites?

orc_dragoon
February 17th, 2009, 01:07 PM
The Best methods would be HTML and CSS. XMl is more of for SEO and Sitemaps.

dzark
February 17th, 2009, 01:12 PM
I use 'Blue Griffon' almost all of the time.

As far as what's better? HTML/CSS/XML/Flash/Java/etc/etc/etc - It all depends on what job you're doing. Have a play with Drupal and Joomla to get you familiar with a full-blown CMS that is heavily reliant on CSS.

xx.canes.rites
February 17th, 2009, 01:21 PM
The Best methods would be HTML and CSS. XMl is more of for SEO and Sitemaps.

SEO would come in handy for the future, as I am an Affiliate Marketer. What is XML in a nutshell?

xx.canes.rites
February 17th, 2009, 01:22 PM
I use 'Blue Griffon' almost all of the time.

As far as what's better? HTML/CSS/XML/Flash/Java/etc/etc/etc - It all depends on what job you're doing. Have a play with Drupal and Joomla to get you familiar with a full-blown CMS that is heavily reliant on CSS.

I want to get into this whole RSS feed and Web2.0 business. What would be some of the Coding I should look into. You named Java, what else would be good? I'm not really to into Flash, so I'll leave that one alone lol.

banago
February 17th, 2009, 01:34 PM
Look here: http://ubuntuforums.org/showpost.php?p=6748430&postcount=90

It might come handy.

xx.canes.rites
February 17th, 2009, 01:46 PM
Look here: http://ubuntuforums.org/showpost.php?p=6748430&postcount=90

It might come handy.

I've commented in that post already Banago. I am using most of what you put up there right now. I am looking for answers for more on the programming side.

dzark
February 17th, 2009, 01:56 PM
Have a look at

http://www.petefreitag.com/item/465.cfm and http://www.devx.com/xml/Article/10790/1954

The trick is to automate it all as much as possible - When you create a new page/document/whatever it gets added to the feed. Many solutions to that, from snappy little php scripts that you run once after each addition to rescan a particular directory upto the feature-rich options with wordpress/drupal/joomla/et al.

xx.canes.rites
February 17th, 2009, 02:56 PM
Have a look at

http://www.petefreitag.com/item/465.cfm and http://www.devx.com/xml/Article/10790/1954

The trick is to automate it all as much as possible - When you create a new page/document/whatever it gets added to the feed. Many solutions to that, from snappy little php scripts that you run once after each addition to rescan a particular directory upto the feature-rich options with wordpress/drupal/joomla/et al.

What is that? That isn't HTML, that looks like something else. I think you are getting ahead of me here.

I'm looking for information on what to start looking into, so I can create all of this stuff. Not to actually be given websites on how to do it, when I don't know what it is in the first place.

Right now all I know is HTML/CSS, what else is there that I should be looking into for a great web design?

I'm looking for an answer similar to this:

HTML
CSS
Text Editor
Types of Text Editor that are best
"Other languages here" i.e. html/xhtml/whatever else
GIMP
InkScape

So on and so forth. What is RSS feed based off of? I don't know what I should know in order to write this stuff. I know I can find the code myself, but what are the codes I should be learning so I can understand what I am doing, not just copy and paste.

xx.canes.rites
February 17th, 2009, 05:53 PM
Also I have another question. How do you layout your website with HTML? I code my document, but it's all just a blob of a mess. How do I give it structure?

Let's say for instance I have a picture that I want to put at a certain coordinate. How do I do this?

Coreigh
February 17th, 2009, 06:58 PM
The correct tools are what ever you are comfortable coding with. Additionally, and you may be well aware of this, use IE, Firefox and Safari, on a Linux, a Mac, and a Windows machine to get the best indication of how your stuff looks and works across the various possible setups.

Finally in case no-one has mentioned it yet add http://www.webmonkey.com/ to your list of resources. They do a great job of giving a clear view of sometimes complicated ideas.

AJB2K3
February 17th, 2009, 07:47 PM
Everyone always forgets the most important site to visit when starting Web design.

http://www.w3c.com
and
http://www.w3schools.com

I use the humble text editor under Accessories for XHTML and CSS.

Use XHTML over HTML and you will have less problems with coding.
Install
Firefox, Opera, Chrome, IE and any other browser you can get to test your pages on.
As to graphics, well, GIMP is the Program I have always used since 1999

xx.canes.rites
February 17th, 2009, 07:50 PM
Everyone always forgets the most important site to visit when starting Web design.

http://www.w3c.com
and
http://www.w3schools.com

I use the humble text editor under Accessories for XHTML and CSS.

Use XHTML over HTML and you will have less problems with coding.
Install
Firefox, Opera, Chrome, IE and any other browser you can get to test your pages on.
As to graphics, well, GIMP is the Program I have always used since 1999

I use text editor also. How do I make the layout for my website though. It's just a mess right now, how do I place things where I want them to be aesthetically.

xx.canes.rites
February 17th, 2009, 08:01 PM
I use text editor also. How do I make the layout for my website though. It's just a mess right now, how do I place things where I want them to be aesthetically.

Okay, I am coding with HTML and CSS, but I don't see where I can set a layout for my website using this coding. Spaces and Tab Spaces don't work because they are not registered using this coding. So what do I use to make my coding look like a website?

AJB2K3
February 17th, 2009, 08:28 PM
You need to read w3schools sites and learn about divs.

Alternativly click on the font link in my sig then goto view>Page source.

I also recomend the book CSS Mastery.


Just a little tip but make a mockup of the site in gimp then come back here for a bit of help. Once we have an idea of what you want we can help out more.

Also visit http://design.ersblock.com/and ask in the forums as there all friendly there and have knowledge coving loads of different side of web design.

xx.canes.rites
February 17th, 2009, 09:49 PM
You need to read w3schools sites and learn about divs.

Alternativly click on the font link in my sig then goto view>Page source.

I also recomend the book CSS Mastery.


Just a little tip but make a mockup of the site in gimp then come back here for a bit of help. Once we have an idea of what you want we can help out more.

Also visit http://design.ersblock.com/and ask in the forums as there all friendly there and have knowledge coving loads of different side of web design.

Already started with 'w3school', finished the HTML walkthrough, but it didn't state anything about structuring your page. It named tables, but I don't want to use tables to structure the layout of my page as that is not coder responsible to use a tabular syntax for layout purposes.

DIV was the type of response I was looking for, thank you for that. Is there anything else that is used to structure the layout of the website?

Also, I have not really specified in my mind yet of what I want to base my website around. I know that I want it to be an Info website that pretty much teaches people how to start web designing from scratch and build a business out of it, but I have to learn first in order to do that.

Basically I'm going to teach how to build a website, glorify their skills and help others that might want to learn those skills. All the while they will get traffic on their sites and can become an Affiliate Marketer, becoming an entrepreneur and generating residual income.

I'm trying to show people how to beat the United States recession (possibly depression), by earning money from the Fortune 250,500, and 1000 companies that caused our economic crisis in the first place. :)

My only problem is that this damn web designing is stopping me from helping out my fellow Patriots! I could bite the bullet and just pay to have a website done, but that is defeating the purpose of educating people to 'Do it yourself'.

If I can just figure out how to structure the layout of my web pages, I can figure out all the other syntax and attribute functions myself by trial and error.

xx.canes.rites
February 17th, 2009, 09:51 PM
You need to read w3schools sites and learn about divs.

Alternativly click on the font link in my sig then goto view>Page source.

I also recomend the book CSS Mastery.


Just a little tip but make a mockup of the site in gimp then come back here for a bit of help. Once we have an idea of what you want we can help out more.

Also visit http://design.ersblock.com/and ask in the forums as there all friendly there and have knowledge coving loads of different side of web design.

O Yea! Thanks for the designer blog. That was very nice of you.

uberg
February 17th, 2009, 10:46 PM
A really good resource (i also recommend w3 school as mentioned above) is dev.opera.com. They have a course based series of articles to teach you "best" coding practices for HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. These articles were written to help colleges develope courses for their Web classes to not only learn HTML, etc. but to learn it right. Very good. I have used them myself.

xx.canes.rites
February 17th, 2009, 11:42 PM
A really good resource (i also recommend w3 school as mentioned above) is dev.opera.com. They have a course based series of articles to teach you "best" coding practices for HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. These articles were written to help colleges develope courses for their Web classes to not only learn HTML, etc. but to learn it right. Very good. I have used them myself.

Thank you so much for this! I appreciate the link.

AJB2K3
February 18th, 2009, 07:23 AM
I cringe every time I see tables mentioned for layouts, tables are foronly displaying data.

As for other items, read through the css bit and you will find that almost all tags can be used for layout.

Usefull tips.

1, The current standered is XHTML,
2, Every page needs a declaration e.g.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN"
"http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
3, All tags must have a matching opening and closing tags e.g.
<p> </p>
4, All tags must be in lower case.
The exeception to 3 is that all single tags (images and br)must end in space/>
5, Using
<meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" />
Helps with issues of special characters not appearing.

argraff
February 18th, 2009, 09:45 PM
I use Bluefish and Geany for code (depending on what I'm doing), and Gimp/Inkscape for images. As for structure, try this:



<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xml:lang="en" lang="en">
<head>
<title>MySite.com</title>
<link href="layout.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" media="all" />
</head>
<body>
<!-- 1. Branding -->
<div id="branding">
<h1>MySite</h1>
</div>

<!-- 2. Content -->
<div id="content">
<h2>Main Content Title</h2>

<p>I always put content before navigation so that if all styles are turned off (or you view it on a small screen device), the important parts are near the top and not buried under all the navigation.</p>
</div> <!-- end content div -->

<!-- 3. Navigation -->
<ul id="navigation"><!-- make this an unordered list, since it's a list of links - semantics! -->
<li><a href="#">Page 1</a></li>
<li><a href="#">Page 2</a></li>
</ul>

<!-- 4. Site Info -->
<div id="footer">
<p>Copyright 2009 - MySite.com</p>
</div><!-- end of #footer -->

</body>
</html>


Then use your CSS to place the parts where you want. Check out Andy Clarke's Transcending CSS once you've got the basics down - he'll blow your mind!

A couple of sites I visit regularly: alistapart.com, webdesignerwall.com, webmonkey.com, nettuts.com...There's a lot of resources out there! Good luck.

argraff
February 18th, 2009, 09:55 PM
Ah, and CSS? The best resource I've found is Eric Meyer's CSS2 reference (http://meyerweb.com/eric/css/references/css2ref.html).

Helpful note (from Andy Clarke):
Relative position is REALLY visual offset position, and absolute position is in relation to the nearest positioned ancestor.

So, if you want to move the navigation in my above example to the top left of the page, use this in your CSS:

body {position: relative;} /* won't change body at all - need it later */
ul {position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0;}

And remember that with relative positioning, content following it will not move up and fill it's space. With absolute positioning, the rest of the content "forgets" it's there and moves around.

And that's how you change where things lie visually.

PS I got Safari for Windows running with the newest version of Wine - one more browser to play with! I currently have FF, Opera, Konquerer, IE6, and Safari running fairly well on 8.10.

Peter76
February 19th, 2009, 09:21 AM
Get "Webdesign in a Nutshell" from O'Reilly, this is a great overview of today's standards based webdesign.

xx.canes.rites
February 19th, 2009, 12:25 PM
Great Feedback guys, thanks for helping me out! I reading up on all of this stuff, also I wanted to ask another question.

I always see websites with pictures that have text over it, like on Newegg.com they have their menu bar with text over it, but every time I try to put letters over my pics to create a link, the text just moves around it, and not on it.

Do I have to actually create the colored gif button with text on it through inkscape/gimp, and then just make a link of it?

Also, I see like on Newegg.com how they have bgcolor=brown or whatever they are using, and then they have a white bg with their content on it. Then it switches to blue at the sides and the end. Are they using tables and filling them with gifs and then putting content over them or how are they doing this?

They have their side menus, and then they have the content in the middle. How are they separating this content from each other? Are they using tables? what are they using to design this layout. This is the #1 issue I am having right now, is lying out my design.

argraff
February 19th, 2009, 04:10 PM
You need to make the background of your links the picture. For example, in your CSS:


ul {background: #fff url(images/background.jpg) repeat-x 0 0;}

What this does: makes the color behind the image white (#fff) in case the image isn't there, gives the location of your image, tells it to repeat horizontally but not vertically, and positions it.

Newegg has set the background to that brownish image, made the background of their content white, and changed the background colors of the other parts. For example:

body {background: #999 url(images/tan-background.jpg) repeat 0 0;}
div#content {background: #fff;}
div#footer {background: #222;}

I just made up the hex #s - use Gimp to find ones you like.

Download the Web Developer toolbar for Firefox - that will let you dissect pages to see how they work. You can even change the HTML and CSS to see what would happen (won't really apply to their page - just shows you what it would be like if those changes were made).

jpon
February 19th, 2009, 06:57 PM
HTML is good enough, just get your basics brushed up and some good art in there.

lyceum
February 19th, 2009, 11:53 PM
I am sure someone is going to disagree with me but...

If you want to get into modern web design/programing learn Ruby on Rails. There is a great Head First Rails book out by O'Reilly.

http://www.amazon.com/Head-First-Rails-companion-Brain-Friendly/dp/0596515774/ref=pd_bbs_9?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1235083520&sr=8-9

Here is why: Rails builds the site for you. Then you go in and edit the HTML, CSS and add JavaScrip as needed. There are lots of tutorials on the web to help you get a site up in about 30 minutes or so and the Rails forums is great.

http://railsforum.com/

If you do not want to do that I recommend you learn HTML CSS JavaScript and PHP if you want to use RSS feeds or databases.

xx.canes.rites
February 20th, 2009, 06:53 AM
I am sure someone is going to disagree with me but...

If you want to get into modern web design/programing learn Ruby on Rails. There is a great Head First Rails book out by O'Reilly.

http://www.amazon.com/Head-First-Rails-companion-Brain-Friendly/dp/0596515774/ref=pd_bbs_9?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1235083520&sr=8-9

Here is why: Rails builds the site for you. Then you go in and edit the HTML, CSS and add JavaScrip as needed. There are lots of tutorials on the web to help you get a site up in about 30 minutes or so and the Rails forums is great.

http://railsforum.com/

If you do not want to do that I recommend you learn HTML CSS JavaScript and PHP if you want to use RSS feeds or databases.

Yea I do not want to use third party programs to build the website for me. I already know how to do that fine, what I want to do is learn the actual coding and how to place objects on my page specifically to make it look nice.

My aim is to learn how to do all this from the ground up and share this information with others, so I can teach them how to be productive and beat this damn recession. Most people depend on jobs and do not have actual skills or trades, so I want to teach them from experience and not just from second hand information.

I wish I could just find a professional web designer that I could buddy up with and pick their brain from time to time while I learn all this.

So If anyone reading this is a Professional Web Designer, and would like to do like a 'Big Brother' type service here, ha ha. I would appreciate it, and so would alot of other people in the Linux Community.

konqueror7
February 20th, 2009, 07:10 AM
make use of html tables to structure forms or layouts, this is what i usually use...gives you like a grid to work on...

xx.canes.rites
February 20th, 2009, 07:38 AM
make use of html tables to structure forms or layouts, this is what i usually use...gives you like a grid to work on...

Well I'm going to use CSS for that. Using tables through HTML for the grid layout increases file sizes and consumes more bandwidth than necessary. Also it optimizes less efficiently, this is part of the reason W3C created CSS in the first place, as a sort of answer to this problem and related issues.

konqueror7
February 20th, 2009, 07:57 AM
Well I'm going to use CSS for that. Using tables through HTML for the grid layout increases file sizes and consumes more bandwidth than necessary. Also it optimizes less efficiently, this is part of the reason W3C created CSS in the first place, as a sort of answer to this problem and related issues.

yeah, its true that the true purpose of CSS is to be the de facto in designing web pages, but then, tables are being heavily used (based on my experience) in navigations, layouts, forms, and specially web applications. the speed will not be noticeable at all, since most of the users today have high-bandwidth internet connections...i still use CSS of course. CSS, Javascript, and HTML is the fundamental tools that composes web pages, from these tools, other tools just sprang out like AJAX and XHTML...

also, the rendering of all the web pages are entirely depended on your rendering engine...

AJB2K3
February 20th, 2009, 08:16 AM
Erm CSS is there to remove ALL presentation data from the .html file making pages easer to debug and load faster.

I said it before - tables are ONLY for displaying Tabloid data and NOT layout.
You wouldn't use a tooth brush to paint your house would you?

konqueror7
February 20th, 2009, 08:41 AM
the way i meant of 'layout' is like a frame or container which you put html elements to better 'layout' you forms.

if its a doll house, yeah!!! :)

xx.canes.rites
February 20th, 2009, 08:53 AM
So any Web-Designers wanna be my buddy and show me the ropes? :P I'll be yer best fren!!!

konqueror7
February 20th, 2009, 09:11 AM
So any Web-Designers wanna be my buddy and show me the ropes? :P I'll be yer best fren!!!

i don't know about that...haha8-[

xx.canes.rites
February 20th, 2009, 09:41 AM
i don't know about that...haha8-[

lol!

konqueror7
February 20th, 2009, 01:12 PM
hey, have you already joined here (/home/konqueror7/Desktop/timer/timer/timer)?

lyceum
February 20th, 2009, 01:55 PM
Yea I do not want to use third party programs to build the website for me. I already know how to do that fine, what I want to do is learn the actual coding and how to place objects on my page specifically to make it look nice.

My aim is to learn how to do all this from the ground up and share this information with others, so I can teach them how to be productive and beat this damn recession. Most people depend on jobs and do not have actual skills or trades, so I want to teach them from experience and not just from second hand information.

I wish I could just find a professional web designer that I could buddy up with and pick their brain from time to time while I learn all this.

So If anyone reading this is a Professional Web Designer, and would like to do like a 'Big Brother' type service here, ha ha. I would appreciate it, and so would alot of other people in the Linux Community.

I am a professional web designer. I build sites in Flash (rarely), Rails (the site I make my money on), XHTML (for little sites), etc... I do not focus on PHP, as I use Rails but I know how it works.

The point of Rails is easy access to a database and that you do not duplicate your work. Once you make a header and a footer you have made all the headers and footers rather than copying and pasting every time. If you want to change something that is on all pagers you change it once rather than on every page. All Rails does is give you a frame work, you still have to work yourself. If you are making a blog you will need Rails or PHP to transfer the data. Rails does the job very nicely without much complication. It is not like Drupal, making the site for you.

If you want to do it the right way, make a mock up on paper including a map of how the pages connect, then design it in GIMP or InkScape. Once you get it exactly as you want it you build it. If you want help once you get to that point, let me know. If you are at that point, let me know how I can help.

konqueror7
February 20th, 2009, 02:13 PM
interesting...so, rails is somehow more similar to ASP.Net than PHP.

PirateChef
February 20th, 2009, 03:08 PM
A good site with tutorials for all kinds of web development is
http://www.yourhtmlsource.com/

It's also a smart idea to learn PHP, because it allows you to get into programming your site.
http://devzone.zend.com/node/view/id/627

What I've been doing lately is looking for ways to make my sites more modular. It's a real pain to have the same menu on 12 pages, and having to update every single one of those pages every time you want to make a change to that menu. So, instead of having 12 .html files, I have 12 .php files, and the menu is accessed through

<?php
include( 'menu.inc' );
?>

Whenever you want to make a change, you update the menu.inc file, instead of having to open all 12 .html files and update them one by one. This is a little tricky to get used to at first, but once you have it, you can split up your websites into "parts that are used only once" and "parts that every page has in common". Of course, you have to have PHP installed on your webhost, but most webhosts have it already.

The easiest way to edit webpages is directly on your host. I use Krusader for this: log in on one pane, select the file, hit F4 to edit, make changes, and then when I save it, it automatically uploads.

It sounds to me like you're still working on learning positioning with CSS. What I'd recommend is working through the tutorials on yourhtmlsource.com, and then, when you've gotten a good grasp on that, learn some PHP.

konqueror7
February 20th, 2009, 03:48 PM
that's the very same thing i do...make multiple php include files and just include them...almost to anything, headers, footers, body, and others...

AJB2K3
February 20th, 2009, 05:59 PM
So any Web-Designers wanna be my buddy and show me the ropes? :P I'll be yer best fren!!!

Do we get a cookie? (web page joke)
Join me over here - http://design.ersblock.com/

xx.canes.rites
February 21st, 2009, 11:37 AM
Do we get a cookie? (web page joke)
Join me over here - http://design.ersblock.com/

I registered there, thanks man. I appreciate it. I <3 you

lyceum
February 22nd, 2009, 11:36 PM
interesting...so, rails is somehow more similar to ASP.Net than PHP.

I am not too familiar with ASP.Net, but Rails is very unlike PHP. You code in Ruby, but you don't really have to know Ruby, as Rails does most of the work building the Ruby code. You do have to go in and tweak the Ruby code a little, but after doing a few tutorials it is not that hard. I find it easier than PHP.

As a web designer I was looking for a way to build my sites from scratch, but I wanted a way of not duplicating my work over and over -particularly the headers and footers. When I found out about Rails, I felt like I had come home. You can build a very complex site quickly and easily, and make you changes once to fix everything.

Take a look at this site:

http://www.economyincrisis.org

Do not worry about the content, I am just using it as an example. This is the site I work on for a living. There are about 20 original pages on the site. When I tweak the page you see an article on, I am tweaking all of the pages with articles. When I change the header, I do it once and it updates all of the headers, because they share data. This make my job very easy.

konqueror7
February 23rd, 2009, 03:14 PM
i stopped on ASP.Net because i don't like the way IDE handles all the hidden works under, so i switched to PHP...mmm, maybe i'll take a look at rails/ruby, do you know perhaps any good sites starting out with it?

as of now i'm still studying jsp/servlet and struts, trying to pursue more on web applications dev't than making web sites, because i don't think i have the creativity to make high graphic contents, i'm a minimalist...

brandon88tube
February 23rd, 2009, 06:51 PM
I just did a quick run through of some of the info and ran into some parts talking about JavaScript. Yeah, it might be good to learn, but you can accomplish most things with either a server side language such as PHP or even well thought out CSS. For one, you need to remember that people block stuff like JavaScript etc. and if you are looking to become a web developer then you should try to step away from some of that stuff unless you really need it. I for one use NoScript and block JavaScript etc. and when I run into an all JavaScript based site it really irks me because the site's functionality becomes ZERO. Half the time I see stuff that can be accomplished with languages such as PHP for example. Why make a form and submit button all based in JavaScript!?... Sorry about that, started to get off topic.

era86
February 23rd, 2009, 10:17 PM
Why not look into the Django web framework? This is very simple and easy to use. I haven't used Ruby on Rails, but it sounds like it is similar to Django from what you guys are describing. It uses Python as its scripting language and I always found it easy to use Python.

But with the switch to Python 3.0, I don't know how much different Django apps will be since it is not backwards compatible.

lyceum
February 25th, 2009, 01:48 AM
i stopped on ASP.Net because i don't like the way IDE handles all the hidden works under, so i switched to PHP...mmm, maybe i'll take a look at rails/ruby, do you know perhaps any good sites starting out with it?

as of now i'm still studying jsp/servlet and struts, trying to pursue more on web applications dev't than making web sites, because i don't think i have the creativity to make high graphic contents, i'm a minimalist...

Rails forum:

http://railsforum.com/

Getting Ruby on Rails on Ubuntu (You have to use ruby gems to install rails, DO NOT use sudo to install Rails).

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/RubyOnRails

(Just use Get Ruby, the latest Gems install, 1.3.1, and install rails. The rest is for servers).

If you want GUI you can use Bluefish, Aptana or Netbeans I use net beans. To install 6.5:

http://newsintegrator.wordpress.com/2008/11/20/installing-netbeans-65-on-linux-ubuntu/

Create a Rails blog with Netbeans in 10 minutes (really takes 30):

http://www.netbeans.org/kb/docs/ruby/rapid-ruby-weblog.html

You can use the help.ubuntu.com doc to install RoR & NewsIntegrator for Netbeans, the walk through at the NetBeans site and have your first RoR website done in less than an hour.

You can also use one of the tutorials on the Rails forums and have one done in about an hour with nothing but terminal and a text editor. I have not really used any of their tutorials, but there are tons on the web. Just be sure the Rails tutorial you pick uses your version of rails. The current is 2.2.2. Also, Rails uses MySQLight (I do not know why) by default. I use NetBeans and chose the MySQL option. I do not know how to make a Rails site with MySQL any other way.

konqueror7
February 25th, 2009, 01:57 AM
thanks fot the resource mate! and just so happened the i also use netbeans 6.5...:p

danboy
February 25th, 2009, 05:07 AM
I highly recommend gedit for rails dev, check out http://grigio.org/pimp_my_gedit_was_textmate_linux or one of the many gedit rails projects on github, you can get a rocking text editor in no time.

The more brave of heart can try vixploder on github.. a collection of VI plugins that are awesome for rails dev.

Also earlier in the thread I think people where confusing XML and XHTML.

XHTML being the subset of XML used to create web pages.

XML alone would need something like XSLT to be converted to a standard web page.

I also have been using inkscape professionally for years, it's a great vector tool for websites. check it out.

xx.canes.rites
February 25th, 2009, 08:03 AM
I highly recommend gedit for rails dev, check out http://grigio.org/pimp_my_gedit_was_textmate_linux or one of the many gedit rails projects on github, you can get a rocking text editor in no time.

The more brave of heart can try vixploder on github.. a collection of VI plugins that are awesome for rails dev.

Also earlier in the thread I think people where confusing XML and XHTML.

XHTML being the subset of XML used to create web pages.

XML alone would need something like XSLT to be converted to a standard web page.

I also have been using inkscape professionally for years, it's a great vector tool for websites. check it out.

Yo Danboy! Okay I am using gEdit to build my website, which is the text editor for Ubuntu 8.10 and 8.04 if you are using it. It's the text editor for Gnome based OS? Well anyway, I'm not too sure what this RAILS business is about, but if I can just use a text editor, that would be awesome.