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caro
January 26th, 2009, 04:16 AM
When reading blogs and forums, the grammatical error I see the most is confusing "then" and "than." Mostly I see people use "more then" when they mean "more than." This only seems to occur when typing/writing, not when people speak.

What grammatical errors do you notice or find amusing? Do you think errors in grammar or typos are more accepted on forums and blogs than in other forms of communication? Is it due to speed or lack of knowledge?

saulgoode
January 26th, 2009, 04:27 AM
I would've thought would of would've been the obvious choice for most prevalent grammatical error.

kaldor
January 26th, 2009, 04:36 AM
Their are to many errors too count ;)

caro
January 26th, 2009, 04:36 AM
I would've thought would of would've been the obvious choice for most prevalent grammatical error.

Maybe it is....I've just noticed then/than a lot lately.

MikeTheC
January 26th, 2009, 04:45 AM
Well, let's see...

Possessivized plurals (that is, the utilization of " 's " to mean a plural)
Pluralized possessives (rarer, but still found, basically not putting an apostrophe before an "s" when quantity > 1)
Comma splices
Run-on sentences
Incomplete sentences
Noun-verb, noun-adjective, verb-adverb disagreement
Improper tense
Shall I go on?

It never fails to amaze me how little pride my fellow humans have in themselves, and how little self-respect they have for themselves, that they would actually write so poorly in public places. I know there are people (here and elsewhere, and I'm not singling anyone out specifically) who fall back on the "I'm handicapped, don't judge me!" reason, but what irritates me so about such things is that I know and have worked with people who are handicapped, and have had customers who were handicapped, and none of them used their handicap as a crutch.

</soapbox>

caro
January 26th, 2009, 04:50 AM
Well, let's see...

Possessivized plurals (that is, the utilization of " 's " to mean a plural)

Good call. I see that on signs, in print..everywhere!

CraigPaleo
January 26th, 2009, 04:55 AM
With the verbs "run,"come" and "go," some people use the past tense instead of the past participle e.g. "I should have ran/came/went" instead of "I should have run/come/gone."

There's also the use of "don't" instead of "doesn't" e.g. "It don't work!"

Polygon
January 26th, 2009, 04:59 AM
Well, let's see...

Possessivized plurals (that is, the utilization of " 's " to mean a plural)
Pluralized possessives (rarer, but still found, basically not putting an apostrophe before an "s" when quantity > 1)
Comma splices
Run-on sentences
Incomplete sentences
Noun-verb, noun-adjective, verb-adverb disagreement
Improper tense
Shall I go on?

It never fails to amaze me how little pride my fellow humans have in themselves, and how little self-respect they have for themselves, that they would actually write so poorly in public places. I know there are people (here and elsewhere, and I'm not singling anyone out specifically) who fall back on the "I'm handicapped, don't judge me!" reason, but what irritates me so about such things is that I know and have worked with people who are handicapped, and have had customers who were handicapped, and none of them used their handicap as a crutch.

</soapbox>

except half the people who make these mistakes are speaking English as a second language. cut them a break.

CraigPaleo
January 26th, 2009, 05:06 AM
except half the people who make these mistakes are speaking English as a second language. cut them a break.

I agree. How about we keep this discussion to native speakers?

To continue, Contracted "is" with "there" or "where" when the predicate is plural e.g. "where's my gloves?" This is a part of Polygon's sixth statement but it's excessive when "there" and "where" are involved.

CraigPaleo
January 26th, 2009, 05:51 AM
Here's a site about common errors in English: http://www.wsu.edu/~brians/errors/

lisati
January 26th, 2009, 05:55 AM
Their are to many errors too count ;)


I of noticed that two.

kavon89
January 26th, 2009, 05:58 AM
I usually close the tab or skip over them if a poster has poor grammer.

CraigPaleo
January 26th, 2009, 05:59 AM
I of noticed that two.
I of too, in a strange sort've way, most recently. :)

lisati
January 26th, 2009, 06:04 AM
I of too, in a strange sort've way, most recently. :)

I was about to edit my post to do a rant about ambiguitiy in certain figures of speech (http://www.thefreedictionary.com/pissed), not to mention people wanting to kick my donkey (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/***), but clicked the wrong thing when looking up references...


Ooops too late, a rant done!


Aspies rule, ok?

yabbadabbadont
January 26th, 2009, 06:13 AM
One of my pet peeves is the use of the phrase, "I could care less", when the user intended, "I couldn't care less."

No one ever understands when I respond to the former with, "So you do care. At least a little bit." :D

CraigPaleo
January 26th, 2009, 06:16 AM
I was about to edit my post to do a rant about ambiguitiy in certain figures of speech (http://www.thefreedictionary.com/pissed), not to mention people wanting to kick my donkey (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/***), but clicked the wrong thing when looking up references...


Ooops too late, a rant done!


Aspies rule, ok?

You're an Aspie? Cool! My cousin is and I believe I'm on the spectrum somewhere. The Aspie quiz told me that I'm most likely an Aspie and my social skills are not the norm. Maybe I should have replied, "me to."

CraigPaleo
January 26th, 2009, 06:18 AM
I was about to edit my post to do a rant about ambiguitiy in certain figures of speech (http://www.thefreedictionary.com/pissed), not to mention people wanting to kick my donkey (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/***), but clicked the wrong thing when looking up references...


Ooops too late, a rant done!


Aspies rule, ok?

You're an Aspie? Cool! My cousin is and I believe I'm on the spectrum somewhere. The Aspie quiz told me that I'm most likely an Aspie. My social skills are not the norm. Maybe I should have replied, "me to.":D

MikeTheC
January 26th, 2009, 06:24 AM
except half the people who make these mistakes are speaking English as a second language. cut them a break.

Reading the post you quoted should have clued you into the fact that my comments are not exclusive of this message board, nor are they directed against those who have no reason to be "native" speakers of English.

However, it's still no excuse. If you want to post in an English-speaking area (which this is), then you should learn sufficient English to do so without embarrassing yourself. You'll also kindly note that I don't venture into the non-English sections of UF for precisely the same reason: I don't speak Spanish, or French, or German, etc., and therefore have no business attempting to post there.

There is one person on this message board in particular, and I'm sorry I can't think of his user name as I write this, but he does not natively speak English, specifically disclaims it in his signature, and has the good grace to actually state he welcomes all positive criticism to help him learn and do better. I respect him, and would point to him as an example of someone who takes pride in himself sufficient to desire to "want to do better".

So please don't try and misinterpret my comments.

In the past, when I used to be at SciFi.com in their Battlestar Galactica area, there was a user from some southeast asian country who asked for help in translating the dialog so he could then insert subtitles when he watched it himself or showed it to friends and family. I was quite happy to help, and provided not just clearly-written transcriptions for him, but also definitions of terms which might not directly translate, so that he could best decide how to represent either individual words or phrases in his native language.

I stopped trying to correct other people's posts after being harrassed as a grammar nazi, and so now I normally don't even bother reading the post, or if it's the starting post of a thread, as kavon89 mentioned, I just close the tab.

EdThaSlayer
January 26th, 2009, 06:29 AM
I think language will have to evolve into a more simplified version as there are too many new words being added day by day and sometimes people can't bother to learn them all. English 2.0 anyone? Web 2.0 has just passed by(not that it meant anything to start with). I'm not a native speaker so, excuzemoi,gracias en tot ziens.

CraigPaleo
January 26th, 2009, 06:32 AM
One of my pet peeves is the use of the phrase, "I could care less", when the user intended, "I couldn't care less."

No one ever understands when I respond to the former with, "So you do care. At least a little bit." :D

True! I've done that when people have used double negatives e.g. "I don't want nothing to do with that person or thing." So, you want something to do with it?

I've noticed the following particularly with people from Maine. When agreeing with someone about a previous statement, they'll use the negative e.g. (original statment) "I like pickles" (person from Maine) "so doesn't John" when he/she means that John does like pickles.

y@w
January 26th, 2009, 06:36 AM
There's an ad on one of our local radio stations lately that switches around less and fewer. I don't know why it's a big deal to me, but it bugs me to no end.. A subtle problem that 99% of people probably would never notice, but I just can't stand it since the people making the commercial are getting paid to do that kind of work..

Maheriano
January 26th, 2009, 06:44 AM
1. People that don't realize "a lot" is two words.
2. Pluralized possessives. Like when you say, "This is my parents' car."
3. The misuse of or/nor. Like if you say, "I don't want to go to Forum A or Forum B." You should say, "I don't want to go to Forum A nor Forum B." The use of or is satisfied unless you go to both which is not the intended use.

MikeTheC
January 26th, 2009, 06:53 AM
Most people still seem too stupid to notice when a mechanical mouse should be cleaned. Why would you expect them to notice grammatical problems with a radio advert?

We don't need a new language, and we don't need to dumb down English, thank you very much. It's not too difficult to learn a language fully if you've bothered to invest the time to learn it at all. I don't mean to be rude or insulting, but that's an excuse.

Now, on the flip side, it is a fact that English is a melting pot. This "melting pot" nature has given us a divergent mix of word origination and word spellings, such as starting "knife" off with a "k". Additionally, it does not help that English, having been considered merely the "common tongue" was never formally taught until sometime during the 1800s, as I recall, and since by that time there were many geographically diverse users of English who had hitherto little in the way of "official rules", they patched it and further screwed it up.

My belief is that Americanization of English was the first useful effort and attempt to clean the language up. That being said, if at some point it was decided to establish an official set of rules (like France has a definitive set of rules governing the French language) I would be quite happy to learn and then abide by them, even if they could be perceived from a certain point of view as being "the Queen's English".

This is not in any way to say or to suggest I'm a neo-luddite who is inflexible and resistant to change. (If I were, what the heck business would I have being a computer enthusiast?) New words and usages come into English all the time, and where they are sensible and non-contradictory I'm happy to make use of them.

But before you go changing English, how about we start properly teaching English?

igknighted
January 26th, 2009, 07:21 AM
But before you go changing English, how about we start properly teaching English?

Well now you are just asking for too much.

And I cannot believe we have gone this far brainstorming common errors in English and not come up with incorrect use of homonyms: to/two/too, there/their/they're, etc.

I know many people find these grammatical errors to be rather ticky-tacky, but I've run into several situations recently where due to errors, I really didn't know what the poster meant (I think it was a due/do confusion). So while 9/10 times it might not matter, the times it does make it worth following the rules all the time.

MikeTheC
January 26th, 2009, 07:45 AM
And I cannot believe we have gone this far brainstorming common errors in English and not come up with incorrect use of homonyms: to/two/too, there/their/they're, etc.

I understand what you mean. I've actually toyed with the idea of just going on a tare of writing nothing but completely incomprehensible gibberish in threads with particularly bad grammar (and perhaps even use really bad spelling) just to drive home the point to them. Of course, they may totally miss the point, and then where would I be for my time and trouble?

igknighted
January 26th, 2009, 07:55 AM
I understand what you mean. I've actually toyed with the idea of just going on a tare of writing nothing but completely incomprehensible gibberish in threads with particularly bad grammar (and perhaps even use really bad spelling) just to drive home the point to them. Of course, they may totally miss the point, and then where would I be for my time and trouble?

Was this an intentional misuse of tare/tear? Or just really ironic...

CraigPaleo
January 26th, 2009, 08:03 AM
How about those who don't feel the need to break their rather long-winded rants into paragraphs?

mkendall
January 26th, 2009, 08:14 AM
Lose/loose is one that I see used correctly only very rarely, leaving me completely baffled. They are neither homonyms nor synonyms. The meanings of the two words have absolutely nothing to do with each other. So why do I almost invariably see them used incorrectly?

I've aleady done a rant on a.k.a./i.e./e.g. in a different thread.

ubuntu27
January 26th, 2009, 08:27 AM
Their are to many errors too count ;)

I am calling the Grammar Police!

"There are too many errors to count"

G. Police: "Sir, you have infringed The Holy Order of the Grammatic Principles".


G. Policy: "You may pay your fine at the nearest Temple of the Grammatic Priciples".

Giant Speck
January 26th, 2009, 08:30 AM
I prefer to be called a Grammar Nazi and not part of the Grammar Police, thank you very much.

http://i279.photobucket.com/albums/kk122/SpecKtacle/emot-colbert-1.gif

oldos2er
January 26th, 2009, 08:34 AM
I usually close the tab or skip over them if a poster has poor grammer.

Or poor spelling....

MikeTheC
January 26th, 2009, 08:36 AM
Was this an intentional misuse of tare/tear? Or just really ironic...
Nope. Believe it or not, that's how that word is spelled in that particular context.


I've aleady done a rant on a.k.a./i.e./e.g. in a different thread.
So then, what you're saying is, if I understand you correctly, it can be understood to mean, from what you have said, given the context and situation, assuming I'm correct, it may be properly deduced that what you've indicated, as far as we know, that it's entirely possible, which I don't believe is the case, unless I'm incorrectly comprehending, that, quite possibly, you have the situation well in hand vis a vis a.k.a., i.e. and e.g., but in another thread?

CraigPaleo
January 26th, 2009, 08:37 AM
Calling Grammar Police!

"There are too many errors to count"


Wait, was that on purpose?

Oh, Geeze! Even after lisati's "two," I didn't pick up on that! Yes, that was on purpose. I hope.:)

CraigPaleo
January 26th, 2009, 08:41 AM
Nope. Believe it or not, that's how that word is spelled in that particular context.


So then, what you're saying is, if I understand you correctly, it can be understood to mean, from what you have said, given the context and situation, assuming I'm correct, it may be properly deduced that what you've indicated, as far as we know, that it's entirely possible, which I don't believe is the case, unless I'm incorrectly comprehending, that, quite possibly, you have the situation well in hand vis a vis a.k.a., i.e. and e.g., but in another thread?

:D You are way too a comma dating!

MikeTheC
January 26th, 2009, 08:42 AM
I prefer to be called a Grammar Nazi and not part of the Grammar Police, thank you very much.
A jack-booted thug of Grammatical Order and Excellence then, eh?

Sounds mellifluous to me.

MikeTheC
January 26th, 2009, 08:43 AM
:D You are way too a comma dating!
Mayhap.

ubuntu27
January 26th, 2009, 08:59 AM
I prefer to be called a Grammar Nazi and not part of the Grammar Police, thank you very much.

http://i279.photobucket.com/albums/kk122/SpecKtacle/emot-colbert-1.gif

Thank you law abiding citizen of the Grammar Union for your faithful contribution to the society.


Do not forget that you serve the Grammar Police.
Please continue your duty as an informer. We grant the power to seize any grammar terrorist to agents who are members of the Order of The Grammar Nazi.

tom66
January 26th, 2009, 09:02 AM
More like a spelling error, but:

"End the coliton of Gaza"

Would help if they could spell coalition.

igknighted
January 26th, 2009, 09:03 AM
Nope. Believe it or not, that's how that word is spelled in that particular context.

Really? It had looked wrong to me, so I looked it up (granted on dictionary.com as I have no better resource at my disposal) before commenting, and the only definitions of tare had to do with weights (as expected) and some sort of biblical weed (you learn something every day, huh?). The only thing that indicated "tare" could work was some archaic forms of tear, but would archaic still be acceptable in modern English?

Honest, I'm not trying to be a ****, I am simply curious.

MikeTheC
January 26th, 2009, 09:05 AM
http://img156.imageshack.us/img156/9489/badgrammardavrosdu5.png

MikeTheC
January 26th, 2009, 09:09 AM
Honest, I'm not trying to be a ****, I am simply curious.
I'm not about to suggest otherwise. It's cool! We all should learn something new every day! ;)

To "go on a tare" about something is basically like going on a rant about something.

Here's a weird one for you, or anyone else who wants to tackle it.

Let us say that you're up for execution for some capital crime. The method of execution involves a gallows and a length of rope.

My question is this: What do you call the act of having that done to you? Does it change when tense (that is, future, present, past) changes?

ubuntu27
January 26th, 2009, 09:09 AM
Here's a site about common errors in English: http://www.wsu.edu/~brians/errors/errors.html

I love that site.

Let's respect the author's (Brian) wishes (http://www.wsu.edu/~brians/errors/review.html).
Instead of linking to http://www.wsu.edu/~brians/errors/errors.html, let us all give the link to http://www.wsu.edu/~brians/errors/

MikeTheC
January 26th, 2009, 09:11 AM
I love that site.

Let's respect the author (Brian) wishes (http://www.wsu.edu/~brians/errors/review.html). Instead of linking to http://www.wsu.edu/~brians/errors/errors.html, let us all give the link to http://www.wsu.edu/~brians/errors/

Are you sure?

CraigPaleo
January 26th, 2009, 09:14 AM
I'm not about to suggest otherwise. It's cool! We all should learn something new every day! ;)

To "go on a tare" about something is basically like going on a rant about something.

Here's a weird one for you, or anyone else who wants to tackle it.

Let us say that you're up for execution for some capital crime. The method of execution involves a gallows and a length of rope.

My question is this: What do you call the act of having that done to you? Does it change when tense (that is, future, present, past) changes?

Hang/hanged/hanged

One hangs. One hanged. One has hanged.

mkendall
January 26th, 2009, 09:14 AM
never mind. beaten to the punch.

ubuntu27
January 26th, 2009, 09:16 AM
Are you sure?

Yes.

I like to respect author's wishes regarding their own work.
Mr. Brian states on his webpage "Linking to “Common Errors in English”" (http://www.wsu.edu/~brians/errors/review.html) that he wants people who are reviewing or recommending his work to link it to http://www.wsu.edu/~brians/errors/

Please note that http://www.wsu.edu/~brians/errors/ and http://www.wsu.edu/~brians/errors/errors.html are not the same.

DarKm4773r
January 26th, 2009, 09:20 AM
I suppose that it's a lack of a good education. Some might be from a combination of speed and the crap that gets under your keys to make it non-responsive(Such as my "a" key).

CraigPaleo
January 26th, 2009, 09:22 AM
I love that site.

Let's respect the author's (Brian) wishes (http://www.wsu.edu/~brians/errors/review.html).
Instead of linking to http://www.wsu.edu/~brians/errors/errors.html, let us all give the link to http://www.wsu.edu/~brians/errors/

I've changed it. I haven't' had time to read through most of it yet but he does seem to have done a lot of research. Thanks. I wouldn't have seen that request for some time.

CraigPaleo
January 26th, 2009, 09:37 AM
never mind. beaten to the punch.

I got it in the email notification. Some people can be hung too. :D

MaxIBoy
January 26th, 2009, 09:54 AM
.

gn2
January 26th, 2009, 10:48 AM
The grammar police are very real.

Here they are pictured on duty protecting the Queen's English outside Buckingham Palace.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/humber/content/images/2005/10/03/grammar_police_car_203x152.jpg

CraigPaleo
January 26th, 2009, 11:07 AM
The grammar police are very real.

Here they are pictured on duty protecting the Queen's English outside Buckingham Palace.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/humber/content/images/2005/10/03/grammar_police_car_203x152.jpg

Great warning! It's best to watch your mouth around them! I once heard of a chap who uttered the word "gotten" and was subsequently clubbed to death because it wasn't in the Queen's vocabulary. He was fatally killed!

MaxIBoy
January 26th, 2009, 11:12 AM
Great warning! It's best to watch your mouth around them! I once heard of a chap who uttered the word "gotten" and was subsequently clubbed to death because it wasn't in the Queen's vocabulary. He was fatally killed!

"Fatally killed?"

CraigPaleo
January 26th, 2009, 11:35 AM
"Fatally killed?"
He was clubbed to death and then killed. The result was fatal. :(

Don't mind me. It's way past my bedtime. ;)

Joeb454
January 26th, 2009, 12:07 PM
The grammar police are very real.

Here they are pictured on duty protecting the Queen's English outside Buckingham Palace.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/humber/content/images/2005/10/03/grammar_police_car_203x152.jpg

Hahaha, that's the best post I've seen all day!

mkendall
January 26th, 2009, 12:07 PM
So then, what you're saying is, if I understand you correctly, it can be understood to mean, from what you have said, given the context and situation, assuming I'm correct, it may be properly deduced that what you've indicated, as far as we know, that it's entirely possible, which I don't believe is the case, unless I'm incorrectly comprehending, that, quite possibly, you have the situation well in hand vis a vis a.k.a., i.e. and e.g., but in another thread?

Precisely.

xpod
January 26th, 2009, 12:11 PM
The grammar police are very real.

Here they are pictured on duty protecting the Queen's English outside Buckingham Palace.

Ah dinnae ken if ah shuld be gan in tae toon the day then;)

gn2
January 26th, 2009, 12:34 PM
Ah dinnae ken if ah shuld be gan in tae toon the day then;)

Jist bide at hame mannie!

xpod
January 26th, 2009, 12:50 PM
Jist bide at hame mannie!

Aye mucker,Ah'murnie gaun(gan is sooo Georide) fer a neb noo the grammer polis are aboot.

lukjad
January 26th, 2009, 01:11 PM
May I sign up for the Grammar Corps? :)

MikeTheC
January 26th, 2009, 04:11 PM
.

Nice catch.

MikeTheC
January 26th, 2009, 04:18 PM
"Fatally killed?"

Well, as opposed to "not seriously killed", which, as we all know, can lead to frivolity and laughter, and that simply wouldn't do for the Queen's English.

Maheriano
January 26th, 2009, 07:58 PM
Oh, one more I hate:
You can't pluralize an acronym by adding "'s". First of all, there would be no need for the apostrophe because it's plural and not posessive. Like when people write DVD's or CD's and what they mean is DVDs or CDs. Secondly, this is still wrong because you can't pluralize an acronym at all. CD stands for compact disc and if you have more than one, it's compact discs. Therefore the acronym for compact discs is still CD and not CDs. Therefore, the pluralized form of CD is CD and the pluralized form of DVD is DVD.

gn2
January 26th, 2009, 08:11 PM
Oh, one more I hate:
You can't pluralize an acronym by adding "'s". First of all, there would be no need for the apostrophe because it's plural and not posessive. Like when people write DVD's or CD's and what they mean is DVDs or CDs. Secondly, this is still wrong because you can't pluralize an acronym at all. CD stands for compact disc and if you have more than one, it's compact discs. Therefore the acronym for compact discs is still CD and not CDs. Therefore, the pluralized form of CD is CD and the pluralized form of DVD is DVD.


NeeNaaNeeNaaNeeNaa!
Pull that post over to the kerb please....

Upper case letter after a colon?
Pluralize?
Surely you mean pluralise?
Posessive?
Surely you mean possessive?
Secondly?
Surely you mean second?
Starting sentences with therefore?

That'll be a £50 fixed penalty.

aysiu
January 26th, 2009, 08:11 PM
I guess it's time for the real grammar police to come out and make an arrest.
Oh, one more I hate:
You can't pluralize an acronym by adding "'s". First of all, there would be no need for the apostrophe because it's plural and not posessive. Like when people write DVD's or CD's and what they mean is DVDs or CDs. Secondly, this is still wrong because you can't pluralize an acronym at all. CD stands for compact disc and if you have more than one, it's compact discs. Therefore the acronym for compact discs is still CD and not CDs. Therefore, the pluralized form of CD is CD and the pluralized form of DVD is DVD. You have no idea what you're talking about. You can and should pluralize acronyms.



3. The misuse of or/nor. Like if you say, "I don't want to go to Forum A or Forum B." You should say, "I don't want to go to Forum A nor Forum B." The use of or is satisfied unless you go to both which is not the intended use. Again, you're wrong. I don't want to go to Forum A or Forum B is absolutely 100% grammatically correct. Your "correction" is incorrect. You say either I don't want to go to Forum A or Forum B or you say I want to go to neither Forum A nor Forum B.

What annoys me the most is people "correcting" correct grammar. Learn grammar before you correct other people.

To follow up on that, I'd say my biggest grammar-related pet peeve is over-correction related to the use of I and me. I know too many university-educated people who use I instead of me when me is correct.

Incorrect:
The dog's yapping made it difficult for Nicola and I to sleep.

Correct:
The dog's yapping made it difficult for Nicola and me to sleep.

To see how ridiculous it is, just change Nicola and I to we:
The dog's yapping made it difficult for we to sleep.

ubuntu27
January 26th, 2009, 08:17 PM
I guess it's time for the real grammar police to come out and make an arrest.


Hear! Hear! Aysiu the English professor became the Grammar Police :)

lukjad
January 26th, 2009, 08:17 PM
I agree wholeheartedly with the above post. Quite a few times, someone has "corrected" me for something that was right.

aysiu
January 26th, 2009, 08:20 PM
Hear! Hear! Aysiu the English professor became the Grammar Police :) A little hyperbole's okay in this situation, I guess. Technically I am an ex-English teacher. Never was a professor. Not currently a teacher.


I agree wholeheartedly with the above post. Quite a few times, someone has "corrected" me for something that was right. What's heartbreaking for me is the fact that my parents, who are immigrants but who speak perfect English (they are actually university professors), often get "corrected" incorrectly by native English speakers who assume they know better just because they were born in the United States.

Truthfully, native speakers often have terrible grammar. My parents have nigh-perfect grammar because they had to learn it from scratch. Nothing was assumed or intuitive for them.

Maheriano
January 26th, 2009, 09:00 PM
You have no idea what you're talking about. You can and should pluralize acronyms.

Reference?

billgoldberg
January 26th, 2009, 09:05 PM
When reading blogs and forums, the grammatical error I see the most is confusing "then" and "than." Mostly I see people use "more then" when they mean "more than." This only seems to occur when typing/writing, not when people speak.

What grammatical errors do you notice or find amusing? Do you think errors in grammar or typos are more accepted on forums and blogs than in other forms of communication? Is it due to speed or lack of knowledge?

I sometimes write "to" instead of "too", same for "of" and "off".

English is not a native language of mine (and many others on the internet), it could be worse.

--

PS: English is a horrible language to learn to write.

Frak
January 26th, 2009, 09:10 PM
Reference?
He used to be a teacher. I don't know how much more qualification he needs.

aysiu
January 26th, 2009, 09:12 PM
Reference?
Fine. I did the Google search for you:
http://wps.ablongman.com/long_faigley_penguinhb_1/0,7325,506336-,00.html
http://www.ups.edu/x19689.xml
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acronym_and_initialism#Representing_plurals_and_po ssessives
http://www.painintheenglish.com/post.php?id=184

Need more?

Frak
January 26th, 2009, 09:16 PM
Need more?

Yes, please :)

lisati
January 26th, 2009, 09:18 PM
You're an Aspie? Cool! My cousin is and I believe I'm on the spectrum somewhere. The Aspie quiz told me that I'm most likely an Aspie. My social skills are not the norm. Maybe I should have replied, "me to.":D

Yes: according to a friendly head shrinker I know through another family member, much of my "eccentricity" can be attributed to being an aspie...... thankfully a mild form.

snowbalance
January 26th, 2009, 09:22 PM
I'd say my biggest grammar-related pet peeve is over-correction related to the use of I and me. I know too many university-educated people who use I instead of me when me is correct.
Oh god, thank you! I'm an English tutor, and I see this every. day. I suppose people think it sounds more intelligent when they say "I" rather than "me." It especially irritates me when I correct it, and the author tries to correct me! Augh!

lisati
January 26th, 2009, 09:23 PM
And I cannot believe we have gone this far brainstorming common errors in English and not come up with incorrect use of homonyms: to/two/too, there/their/they're, etc.

Homonym? I thought the word was "homophone".... or is the autistic side to my makeup just getting fussy?

<aside>
The English word "fussy" sounds like the Samoan word "fasi", which rougly translates as "slap".... perhaps I should slap myself for making stupid comments.....
</aside>

aysiu
January 26th, 2009, 09:25 PM
Yes, please :)
Okay. One more. But that's it.
http://www.archereditorial.com/arch1.htm

aysiu
January 26th, 2009, 09:27 PM
Homonym? I thought the word was "homophone".... or is the autistic side to my makeup just getting fussy? Homophones and homonyms are pretty much the same thing.

MaxIBoy
January 26th, 2009, 09:39 PM
My biggest source of errors stems from the way I learned to type; I type things phonetically.

For example, sometimes I mistakenly type "plase," even when I know for a fact that the correct spelling is "place."

This isn't really a problem with my grammar, but that doesn't make it less annoying.

289Shelby
January 26th, 2009, 10:29 PM
Two that irritate me:

"your" when they mean the contraction of "you are" (you're) and "there" when they mean "their" possessive.

On a side note, it amuses me when someone posts to complain about another posters "grammer"

Frak
January 26th, 2009, 11:06 PM
Okay. One more. But that's it.
http://www.archereditorial.com/arch1.htm
I meant it as a joke, but thanks anyways :)

Maheriano
January 26th, 2009, 11:07 PM
Fine. I did the Google search for you:
http://wps.ablongman.com/long_faigley_penguinhb_1/0,7325,506336-,00.html
http://www.ups.edu/x19689.xml
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acronym_and_initialism#Representing_plurals_and_po ssessives
http://www.painintheenglish.com/post.php?id=184

Need more?

Okay so it's been adopted into the language but it still doesn't make any sense. It shouldn't have been adopted in the first place, acronyms have no business being pluralized.

aysiu
January 26th, 2009, 11:17 PM
Okay so it's been adopted into the language but it still doesn't make any sense. It shouldn't have been adopted in the first place, acronyms have no business being pluralized.
Perhaps you should invent your own version of English that is logical and consistent. Teaching English grammar is difficult because English grammar rules are not consistent, logical, or even unchanging.

Nevertheless, I couldn't find any evidence that what you said was ever the case and has now gone out of fashion. As far as I can tell, pluralizing acronyms has always been acceptable.

t0p
January 26th, 2009, 11:54 PM
Homophones and homonyms are pretty much the same thing.

According to wordnet.princeton.edu:


two words are homophones if they are pronounced the same way but differ in meaning or spelling or both (e.g. bare and bear)

two words are homonyms if they are pronounced or spelled the same way but have different meanings

By that definition, homophones can mean the same as homonyms but it ain't necessarily so.

aysiu
January 26th, 2009, 11:58 PM
According to wordnet.princeton.edu:



By that definition, homophones can mean the same as homonyms but it ain't necessarily so.
That's why I said "pretty much the same thing" instead of "exactly the same thing."

I looked it up on Dictionary.com and saw those as two possible definitions. But the first definition of homonyn was homophone.

I think the implication is that the difference is mainly nuance and not a strict difference in definition.

yabbadabbadont
January 27th, 2009, 12:10 AM
Teaching English grammar is difficult because English grammar rules are not consistent, logical, or even unchanging.

Which is probably why I learned more about English grammar while taking a semester of German, than I ever did in an English class. :D

(The German teacher could compare and contrast in his examples.)

MikeTheC
January 27th, 2009, 02:57 AM
@ aysiu, RE: pluralization of acronyms

+2

bruce89
January 27th, 2009, 03:02 AM
.

Bug filed (http://bugzilla.gnome.org/show_bug.cgi?id=569275). I once filed 3 bugs about use of "loose" instead of "lose".

Anyway, I like the use of the ` key as an apostrophe. Also, people being over-cautious and not bothering with apostrophes is interesting. My favourite is when people stick an apostrophe in a word which just happens to end with 's'.

Kopachris
January 27th, 2009, 03:44 AM
The most common mistakes I see are 1) improper punctuation/capitalization, and 2) misuse of effect/affect.

Kopachris
January 27th, 2009, 03:46 AM
Which is probably why I learned more about English grammar while taking a semester of German, than I ever did in an English class. :D

(The German teacher could compare and contrast in his examples.)
Amen to that! :D I'm glad I'm not the only one!

init1
January 27th, 2009, 03:53 AM
Possessivized plurals (that is, the utilization of " 's " to mean a plural)
Pluralized possessives (rarer, but still found, basically not putting an apostrophe before an "s" when quantity > 1)
Comma splices
Run-on sentences
Incomplete sentences
Noun-verb, noun-adjective, verb-adverb disagreement
Improper tense
Shall I go on?

9. ???
10. Profit!

Maheriano
January 27th, 2009, 04:55 AM
Bug filed (http://bugzilla.gnome.org/show_bug.cgi?id=569275). I once filed 3 bugs about use of "loose" instead of "lose".
This one's in Office Space. The Jump To Conclusions mat says, "Loose A Turn."

lisati
January 27th, 2009, 09:10 PM
[QUOTE=289Shelby;6621977]Two that irritate me:

"your" when they mean the contraction of "you are" (you're) and "there" when they mean "their" possessive.

/QUOTE]

Add "there", as in the place....

Sometimes I think people type in haste (I've done it myself) being more concerned with the idea being presented, without worrying too (two? to?) much about finer details.

CraigPaleo
February 1st, 2009, 08:41 AM
Aye mucker,Ah'murnie gaun(gan is sooo Georide) fer a neb noo the grammer polis are aboot.

Wicker Man! Is that Gaelic you speak?

bruce89
February 1st, 2009, 10:25 AM
Wicker Man! Is that Gaelic you speak?

That's Scots. Gaelic is more like "Buachaille Etive Mor".

gn2
February 1st, 2009, 08:52 PM
Wicker Man! Is that Gaelic you speak?

I will translate for you...

Aye mucker = yes my friend

Ah'murnie = I am not

gaun = going

fer a neb = for a nosey

noo = now

are aboot = are about

Had it been the Aberdeen grammar police it would have been "noo the grammer polis is aboot", because plurals in Aberdeen are singular.

le singe
February 1st, 2009, 09:31 PM
I was half expecting to see this one as I was reading through this thread, so I'll share.

This is primarily a problem you hear, though I guess people must mistakenly write it as well. It drives me crazy. The incorrect use of the past participle of the verb see, replacing the correct form of the verb in the simple past tense.

Example: Hey, I seen your brother last night at the club.
(of course, it should be "saw your brother last night...")

Oh it irks me whenever I hear such things.

Namtabmai
February 1st, 2009, 09:47 PM
Not exactly tense but what about phrase like;

"Can you borrow me you XXX"?

I wonder if these sorts of changes are colloquialism, I think that the borrow/lend thing is restricted (thank god) to certain regions of America. Although I'm sure I've heard similar bastardisations in the U.K.

CraigPaleo
February 4th, 2009, 10:06 AM
I will translate for you...

Aye mucker = yes my friend

Ah'murnie = I am not

gaun = going

fer a neb = for a nosey

noo = now

are aboot = are about

Had it been the Aberdeen grammar police it would have been "noo the grammer polis is aboot", because plurals in Aberdeen are singular.

Okay, what's a "nosey"? I went to high school with a Jamaican who'd say "do me a beg ya fi" for "do me favor."

I love "Scotch" accents. I once met a Canadian from Labrador. His accent was very similar to that of a Scott - rolling R's and all.

CraigPaleo
February 4th, 2009, 10:18 AM
Not exactly tense but what about phrase like;

"Can you borrow me you XXX"?

I wonder if these sorts of changes are colloquialism, I think that the borrow/lend thing is restricted (thank god) to certain regions of America. Although I'm sure I've heard similar bastardisations in the U.K.

I haven't heard "borrow me" but there is a difference with loan/lend. The British use "lend" as a verb and "loan" as a noun. Americans use "loan" as a noun but both "loan" and "lend" as a verb. "Could you loan me XXX?"

This does remind me of people who say such things as "I'm going to buy ME a computer" instead of "I'm going to get MYSELF a computer."

CraigPaleo
February 4th, 2009, 10:24 AM
I was half expecting to see this one as I was reading through this thread, so I'll share.

This is primarily a problem you hear, though I guess people must mistakenly write it as well. It drives me crazy. The incorrect use of the past participle of the verb see, replacing the correct form of the verb in the simple past tense.

Example: Hey, I seen your brother last night at the club.
(of course, it should be "saw your brother last night...")

Oh it irks me whenever I hear such things.

I can't believe I hadn't thought of that one myself! It's VERY irksome!
"I seen him."

CraigPaleo
February 4th, 2009, 10:35 AM
Zip: I've heard one person use the word "zippen" e.g. "zippen your shorts." I've heard another use "zipper" e.g. "zipper the luggage."

The first person is someone I know and could tell her that it should be "zip." The second, was a guest where I work. I just "zipped" my mouth shut as she was a guest.

xpod
February 4th, 2009, 10:38 AM
Okay, what's a "nosey"? I went to high school with a Jamaican who'd say "do me a beg ya fi" for "do me favor."

A nosey is just a wee neb of course;)
A "neb" is just your nose.To have a "neb" is to have a look...or be a nosey git.

http://www.firstfoot.com/php/glossary/phpglossar_0.8/index.php

CraigPaleo
February 4th, 2009, 11:10 AM
A nosey is just a wee neb of course;)
A "neb" is just your nose.To have a "neb" is to have a look...or be a nosey git.

http://www.firstfoot.com/php/glossary/phpglossar_0.8/index.php

Thanks! LOL! Check out this thread in Cockney: http://www.rinkworks.com/dialect/dialectp.cgi?dialect=cockney&url=http%3A%2F%2Fubuntuforums.org%2Fshowthread.php %3Ft%3D1050685

That's more southern U.K though.

There is a family from the U.K. whose last name is Proudfoot. I always want to refer to the family as the "ProudFEET" instead of the Proudfoots. I have to stop and think before making a faux pas.

xpod
February 4th, 2009, 01:41 PM
Thanks! LOL! Check out this thread in Cockney: http://www.rinkworks.com/dialect/dia...%3Ft%3D1050685

That's more southern U.K though.

Although i`m Scottish i`ve lived down here in South East London for the last ten years so both my accent and indeed my Scottish vocabulary have had to be tamed quite a bit in that time,just to suit the ****-a-knees:D
Three of our children were born back home in Scotland and two down here so the accents & vocabulary within this house are probably about as messed up as "proper English" could ever possibly be.

gn2
February 4th, 2009, 01:54 PM
I think spoken English varies much more in Britain than in the US.

There's a bench seat at Gourdon (http://www.undiscoveredscotland.co.uk/gourdon/gourdon/) harbour where the old worthies of the village hang out, and if you walk past and hear them speaking, you would think you were hearing a foreign language.

nothingspecial
February 4th, 2009, 02:09 PM
Because this is a forum, correct grammar is not necessary.

A forum is a place for discussion. In ancient times a forum was a public meeting place in which people spoke. Although internet forum discussions are in the written form the posts should be treated as spoken conversation.
If the post is understandable then deviations from correct English grammar are excusable. I`m positive that most of the grammar police/nazis here do not speak as they would write, not many people do.

Official Ubuntu documentation should be grammatically correct, but conversational posts need not be.

mkendall
February 4th, 2009, 05:54 PM
I`m positive that most of the grammar police/nazis here do not speak as they would write, not many people do.


I guess I'm the exception. I've been told many times that I do, in fact, speak in the same manner as I write.


(A friend who taught English is proof reading a letter I have written letting "The Powers That Be" know that I quit, why I'm quitting, and that they can go **** themselves:)
"You want to change this sentence. The 'voice' of the letter should be more conversational; this is too formal. People don't speak like this in conversation."

"Funny. I've been told that I write the same as I speak."

"You do; people don't. You need to change it."

sanderella
February 4th, 2009, 06:13 PM
There is at least one grammatical mistake in nearly every post in this thread.;)

Try http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/ for some tips.

MikeTheC
February 5th, 2009, 06:20 AM
Verbal Advantage used to begin their radio advertisements with the phrase "People judge you by the words you use."

Why shouldn't we? How you communicate (i.e. both your overall lexicon and word choice) are not merely a reflection of how you were raised, but how you choose to function in society. People who speak poorly are taken to have little pride in themselves.

Whether through a written or spoken medium, you are still engaging in the act of communication. Quit making excuses for yourself. Learn to write or learn to accept being treated poorly and thought less of by others. If you have a problem with that, don't put your words out into the public discourse of the Internet.

Bottom line: If you don't have respect for yourself, why should the rest of us have respect for you?

lykwydchykyn
February 5th, 2009, 06:52 AM
I don't get bothered too much by simple mistakes, nor by intentionally wrong colloquialisms. Everyone forgets an "o" or puts an apostrophe in the wrong place now and then, and torturing English grammar on purpose can be fun.

I only really get bugged when people try to use intellectual phrases and fail miserably. For instance, people will use the phrase "in lieu of" to mean "in light of" or "in view of" (which is wrong -- it means "in place of". But of course all of you knew that).

One thing always makes me chuckle: in my extensive travels across the southern and midwestern US, I've seen a number of signs which misspell "y'all". They spell it "ya'll", which is clearly wrong since it's a contraction for "you all" (which is itself grammatically incorrect, so that's a double-whammy).

MikeTheC
February 5th, 2009, 07:13 AM
I don't get bothered too much by simple mistakes, nor by intentionally wrong colloquialisms. Everyone forgets an "o" or puts an apostrophe in the wrong place now and then, and torturing English grammar on purpose can be fun.

I only really get bugged when people try to use intellectual phrases and fail miserably. For instance, people will use the phrase "in lieu of" to mean "in light of" or "in view of" (which is wrong -- it means "in place of". But of course all of you knew that).

One thing always makes me chuckle: in my extensive travels across the southern and midwestern US, I've seen a number of signs which misspell "y'all". They spell it "ya'll", which is clearly wrong since it's a contraction for "you all" (which is itself grammatically incorrect, so that's a double-whammy).

Thus proving there are many stupid people with whom you share this planet...

CraigPaleo
February 20th, 2009, 10:50 PM
I think spoken English varies much more in Britain than in the US.

There's a bench seat at Gourdon (http://www.undiscoveredscotland.co.uk/gourdon/gourdon/) harbour where the old worthies of the village hang out, and if you walk past and hear them speaking, you would think you were hearing a foreign language.

Has past/passed been brought up yet?

gn2, I may have asked you this before. I know I've though about it but what exactly is your avatar?

gn2
February 20th, 2009, 11:31 PM
Has past/passed been brought up yet?

gn2, I may have asked you this before. I know I've though about it but what exactly is your avatar?

Don't know about past/passed having been discused in the thread, but in the context of the quote you made, it's very definitely past.

My avatar? Rotate clockwise 90° and it might look more familiar.

It's the cover of Pink Floyd's best album, Meddle (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meddle), and is a human ear under water.
The track Echoes is my favourite piece of music.

Here's the full image (http://www.studio18.co.uk/shop/images/Thorgerson/Meddle.jpg) as it appeared on the outside of the original fold out 12" album sleeve,
this was the picture on the inside (http://www.pinkfloyd-co.com/disco/meddle/art/meddle29.jpg).

CraigPaleo
February 20th, 2009, 11:37 PM
One thing always makes me chuckle: in my extensive travels across the southern and midwestern US, I've seen a number of signs which misspell "y'all". They spell it "ya'll", which is clearly wrong since it's a contraction for "you all" (which is itself grammatically incorrect, so that's a double-whammy).

Yes, and I don't believe that I've ever seen "you-all" hyphenated as we were taught it should be in formal writing. My use of "y'all" is one thing that might give my Southernness away.

How about the use of "you lot" in the UK, "yous" in the Northeastern U.S., the contraction of "you ones" (yins?) in Ohio or the Appalachian region, and "you guys," which is ubiquitous in most of the U.S.?

I'm curious about any other plural forms of "you," formal or informal, there might be in other English-speaking regions.

Giant Speck
February 20th, 2009, 11:49 PM
Don't know about past/passed having been discused in the thread, but in the context of the quote you made, it's very definitely past.

My avatar? Rotate clockwise 90° and it might look more familiar.

It's the cover of Pink Floyd's best album, Meddle (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meddle), and is a human ear under water.
The track Echoes is my favourite piece of music.

Here's the full image (http://www.studio18.co.uk/shop/images/Thorgerson/Meddle.jpg) as it appeared on the outside of the original fold out 12" album sleeve, this was the picture on the inside (http://www.pinkfloyd-co.com/disco/meddle/art/meddle29.jpg).

You know those pictures that say "When you see it, you'll ***** bricks?"

This was almost one of them.

CraigPaleo
February 20th, 2009, 11:58 PM
Don't know about past/passed having been discused in the thread, but in the context of the quote you made, it's very definitely past.

My avatar? Rotate clockwise 90° and it might look more familiar.

It's the cover of Pink Floyd's best album, Meddle (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meddle), and is a human ear under water.
The track Echoes is my favourite piece of music.

Here's the full image (http://www.studio18.co.uk/shop/images/Thorgerson/Meddle.jpg) as it appeared on the outside of the original fold out 12" album sleeve, this was the picture on the inside (http://www.pinkfloyd-co.com/disco/meddle/art/meddle29.jpg).

I only emphasized "past" because it reminded me of "past/passed," not because I thought it was wrong.

Thanks for the explanation of your avatar. It'd always looked pornographic to me. :)

CraigPaleo
February 21st, 2009, 12:05 AM
You know those pictures that say "When you see it, you'll ***** bricks?"

This was almost one of them.

*Shat another brick in the wall*

Giant Speck
February 21st, 2009, 12:13 AM
*Shat another brick in the wall*

Now that was funny.