PDA

View Full Version : Computer Science FAIL



ankursethi
January 19th, 2009, 07:45 PM
All right, this is what happened in college today. Quoting from my blog :


This piece might come across as one intended to bad mouth my own college, but I have a sneaking suspicion that things aren’t all rosy in other parts of the country either.

I suppose every geek has had this same feeling before. You take a seat in the front row of your first Introduction to Programming lecture, all worked up about the fact that here, finally, is a class you can be on top of. The professor walks in, gives a little introduction, and you realize it’s going to be a long, long semester.

Today I decided to make a list of all the atrocities committed by my Introduction to Programming professor. I wasn’t expecting much because, even though he sounded like a complete knucklehead to the geek inside me, I was sure he at least knew the textbook inside-out. I was, as one would expect, wrong. So, hackers, get ready to cringe. Here’s my list.

* Linux is basically a DOS based OS.
* These days we are using 128 and 256 bit processors.
* A compiler is a software that converts code written in a particular programming language to machine code. To compile a program, you must hit ALT+F9. (It took me a while to realize he was talking about the Borland Turbo C++ IDE from 1992, a prehistoric compiler Indian colleges use for all C and C++ courses.)
* The object code generated by a C++ compiler is almost identical to that produced by a Java compiler.
* The first high level language was Ada, also known as Smalltalk. (This was a big WTF moment.)
* The second high level language was COBOL, which was an improvement over Ada. (Cringe, cringe, cringe.)
* FOTRAN came after COBOL. (No, “FOTRAN” is not a typo. This is what he said.)
* FOTRAN, COBOL, Ada and Smalltalk were not general purpose languages.
* This one is classic: C was the first language to run on UNIX systems. All languages before C ran only on Windows.

I still haven’t completely recovered from the shock.

Here's the link to the post on my blog, if anybody wants to share it : http://blog.uncool.in/2009/01/19/computer-science-fail-higher-education-in-india/

Now what? Do I tell the guy he's wrong? Telling the college authorities won't help at all because my college is already short of professors and the administration wouldn't even dream of kicking one out.

EDIT: Fixed messed up formatting.

Simian Man
January 19th, 2009, 07:52 PM
Wow I feel sorry for you. And even more sorry for other students who aren't aware he has no clue. Hopefully the rest of the faculty are better.

jimi_hendrix
January 19th, 2009, 08:08 PM
God save your soul

lifestream
January 19th, 2009, 08:10 PM
Wow, that's DIGUSTING.
Well, I hope you are atleast dropping the class... or even the college!
I would still report him. You never know. they might have a backup; atleast for next semester.
And I wouldn't feel bad about education in India, it's not much better here in USA.

Maheriano
January 19th, 2009, 08:13 PM
I had a history professor once ask the class to go to the library and look up the population of our birth province for 1931 in the Canadian census records. I asked him what we should do for Newfoundland and he looked at me puzzled.....Newfoundland was the last province to join confederation in 1949, until then we were part of Britain. This guy was a history professor.

NiklasV
January 19th, 2009, 08:33 PM
:shock:
And this was a CS professor???
You seriously need to find a new college if you can...

scragar
January 19th, 2009, 08:38 PM
I had a similar problem at college, I corrected my teacher when ever they said anything that was wrong, I might have held up the class, but I think people learnt more out of it.

ankursethi
January 19th, 2009, 08:52 PM
I wish I could find a new college, but that's just not possible. College education is cheap in India, so everyone wants to get a degree. The result is too many applicants for very few seats. Every college has its own selection procedure involving *shudder* "entrance exams". Getting through one of those is not easy. It was scary enough the first time, and going through it a second time will probably kill me.

Did I mention how Indian universities work? Here's how - "This is the lecture schedule for the week. If you have less than 75% attendance in any of the subject, you fail. Have a nice day."

(Not that all Universities are this bad. The problem is that all the cool ones have at least 80 to 100 applicants competing for each seat.)

Coreigh
January 19th, 2009, 08:53 PM
Well, just because he's an idiot doesn't mean that the class will be useless. You may not learn anything from him but you may still learn. With ANY class you take at ANY level it is far more important to know how to learn and to know how to find the answers than any material presented in class. Memorization only gets you so far.

I will agree with scragar and say that it is useful to everyone in the class to be vocal about the correct information. BUT avoid getting in to a 'pissing contest' with the prof' and know the difference between real mis-information and just irritating semantics.

For example his comment about 'nixes being DOS based. In the sense that they are command line Disk Operating Systems, they are DOS based. Of course they are not MS-DOS based as he failed to clarify the differences of DOS vs. MS-DOS.

jimi_hendrix
January 19th, 2009, 09:09 PM
i predict an easy A at least

slavik
January 19th, 2009, 10:10 PM
Just keep correcting him and probing for more info when you feel he is wrong. :) (personal opinion, of course)

laceration
January 19th, 2009, 11:12 PM
Don't let school get in the way of your education.:)

sujoy
January 19th, 2009, 11:15 PM
@OP
dude i know how exactly you feel right now. i have been dealing with this for the past 3.5 years almost. just carry on with your studies and grab the degree. i tried correcting my professors earlier, but there is only so much one can do :(

Shin_Gouki2501
January 19th, 2009, 11:19 PM
looking for pitty?
If you take it serious you should study the stuff from lesson on your own. What again was the subject?

TreeFinger
January 19th, 2009, 11:19 PM
i predict an easy A at least


word up!

cardinals_fan
January 19th, 2009, 11:21 PM
*cries self to sleep at one in the afternoon*

Montblanc_Kupo
January 19th, 2009, 11:22 PM
At least you didn't spend a week coddling the lower half of the gene pool by explaining how to use the mouse for a solid week like they did in My CIS classes *shudder*

Cracauer
January 20th, 2009, 12:04 AM
* A compiler is a software that converts code written in a particular programming language to machine code. To compile a program, you must hit ALT+F9. (It took me a while to realize he was talking about the Borland Turbo C++ IDE from 1992, a prehistoric compiler Indian colleges use for all C and C++ courses.)

Depends. Was it the same key in Borland C 2.0? That one rocked (sans broken stuff). Turbo C++? Nah.

bixejo
January 22nd, 2009, 10:47 AM
I wish I could find a new college, but that's just not possible. College education is cheap in India, so everyone wants to get a degree. The result is too many applicants for very few seats. Every college has its own selection procedure involving *shudder* "entrance exams". Getting through one of those is not easy. It was scary enough the first time, and going through it a second time will probably kill me.

Did I mention how Indian universities work? Here's how - "This is the lecture schedule for the week. If you have less than 75% attendance in any of the subject, you fail. Have a nice day."

(Not that all Universities are this bad. The problem is that all the cool ones have at least 80 to 100 applicants competing for each seat.)
Well, sounds like it's much easier to get a professor position than a student seat... Otherwise, I cannot explain how that guy is currently a college professor (it's still hard to believe that he can say those things... Are you sure you're not exaggerating a bit??)

nvteighen
January 22nd, 2009, 12:55 PM
i predict an easy A at least

Nope. The worse the teacher the greater the standard deviation in grades. I experience this with a professor of mine who is absolutely disastrous.

Seriously, I'd try to get out of there... If you can't, then be patient and smile at him; if you start correcting him each class he'll end up hating you and knocking you down on purpose.

DocForbin
January 22nd, 2009, 02:22 PM
So sad.

Skip class and watch the free Standford CS classes on youtube?

http://www.deviceguru.com/stanford-frees-cs-robotics-courses/

cl333r
January 22nd, 2009, 04:28 PM
“All languages before C ran only on Windows.”
What can possibly make one think so, I've never heard anything close to this before.

WitchCraft
January 22nd, 2009, 04:46 PM
Somehow remembers me to just about any math lectures at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology...

The ressemblance is striking - just that the professors don't even bother to turn up, they send their assistants, which definitely have no clue at all...

mssever
January 22nd, 2009, 05:33 PM
I took a music theory class from an instructor who didn't know his material very well and who often confused the other students with the way he explained things. After a while, I started regularly correcting him and explaining things that he muddled. I doubt he liked me all that well, but I still got an A.

Caduceus
January 22nd, 2009, 05:41 PM
One of my college (in the UK, dread to think if Universtiy will be worse) tutors is teaching us non-standard C++ (we're the first class to move on from void main() ), and imagine the horror when I overheard him saying Java was created to program websites and that Javascript was a dialect of Java.

Tomosaur
January 22nd, 2009, 10:05 PM
What can possibly make one think so, I've never heard anything close to this before.

Which came first - the programming language or 'The Windows'?

Tricky one :/

lykwydchykyn
January 22nd, 2009, 10:14 PM
What can possibly make one think so, I've never heard anything close to this before.

What, you didn't know they ran Windows on the ENIAC? Minesweeper was originally used for tactical ops in WWII.

jimi_hendrix
January 22nd, 2009, 10:53 PM
lol
ask him what was the first language to run on a mac...

WitchCraft
January 23rd, 2009, 01:55 AM
One of my college (in the UK, dread to think if Universtiy will be worse) tutors is teaching us non-standard C++ (we're the first class to move on from void main() ), and imagine the horror when I overheard him saying Java was created to program websites and that Javascript was a dialect of Java.

There's a point to that.
I write my websites in HTML & PHP.

Flash, CFM, ASP, JavaScipt, .NET, Java, & other bytecode things --> BANNED

Moved the Server to PPC Linux, so x86 shellcode doesn't work *hehe*

jimi_hendrix
January 23rd, 2009, 01:58 AM
Flash, CFM, ASP, JavaScipt, .NET, Java, & other bytecode things --> BANNED

Moved the Server to PPC Linux, so x86 shellcode doesn't work *hehe*
why?

WitchCraft
January 29th, 2009, 03:07 AM
why?
Flash, CFM --> Memory hog due to memory leaks and bad practises
ASP --> forces you to use windows, too insecure, new versions only with .Net
JavaScipt --> inconsistent browser implementations, bad for search engine rankings
.NET, Java & other bytecode things --> i don't like anything that forces you to use proprietary software or techs, and i hate the long loading times, and I especially hate the two combined...

So I chose a hardened PHP version and, if it absolutely must be, CGI-scripts.

Ferrat
January 29th, 2009, 04:27 AM
That makes me feel safe, the future of tech-support <3

kavon89
January 29th, 2009, 04:38 AM
* Linux is basically a DOS based OS.
* These days we are using 128 and 256 bit processors.
* A compiler is a software that converts code written in a particular programming language to machine code. To compile a program, you must hit ALT+F9. (It took me a while to realize he was talking about the Borland Turbo C++ IDE from 1992, a prehistoric compiler Indian colleges use for all C and C++ courses.)
* The object code generated by a C++ compiler is almost identical to that produced by a Java compiler.
* The first high level language was Ada, also known as Smalltalk. (This was a big WTF moment.)
* The second high level language was COBOL, which was an improvement over Ada. (Cringe, cringe, cringe.)
* FOTRAN came after COBOL. (No, “FOTRAN” is not a typo. This is what he said.)
* FOTRAN, COBOL, Ada and Smalltalk were not general purpose languages.
* This one is classic: C was the first language to run on UNIX systems. All languages before C ran only on Windows.
http://i44.tinypic.com/2yybhih.jpg

mssever
January 30th, 2009, 11:51 PM
JavaScipt --> inconsistent browser implementations, bad for search engine rankingsJS isn't necessarily bad for search engine rankings. It depends on how you use it.

.NET, Java & other bytecode things --> i don't like anything that forces you to use proprietary software or techs, and i hate the long loading times, and I especially hate the two combined...Java doesn't necessarily force you into proprietary territory; neither do some other bytecode languages such as Python. And it depends on your application for whether you'd have a long load time (at least for Python; I can't speak for Java).

shindz
January 31st, 2009, 02:09 AM
One of my college (in the UK, dread to think if Universtiy will be worse) tutors is teaching us non-standard C++ (we're the first class to move on from void main() ), and imagine the horror when I overheard him saying Java was created to program websites and that Javascript was a dialect of Java.

My programming professor want us to write "void main()",that was an strange for me, so I decide to keep writing "int main()... return 0;"
the programming class is about C++, not C, but all the time use #include< stdio.h>....
printf, and incredible, gets(); the only thing I saw once, was class.

Ferrat
January 31st, 2009, 02:55 AM
My programming professor want us to write "void main()",that was an strange for me, so I decide to keep writing "int main()... return 0;"
the programming class is about C++, not C, but all the time use #include< stdio.h>....
printf, and incredible, gets(); the only thing I saw once, was class.

http://users.aber.ac.uk/auj/voidmain.shtml
Just instruct your teacher why not to use void main() it's about C but applies to C++ as well

skullmunky
February 1st, 2009, 08:40 AM
change IS inevitable. teaching computer engineering means you're always about 1 minute away from being obsolete and embarrassingly wrong. hence things like missing the boat on things like updated requirements for return values from main().

in the OP's case it's hard to say what advice to give:

(a) you have someone who just doesn't know much, period
(b) you have someone who is just awfully hazy on their history, but has a lot to offer in terms of actual programming and/or CS concepts
(c) your professor is actually Ashton Kutcher, and you've been Punk'd.

in an optimistic world, hope for (b), get what you can from the course, and fact-check the lectures ... from your description of the university system I bet that insistently correcting your prof will do almost no good at all, but feel free to direct your classmates to ubuntuforums.org :)

tom66
February 1st, 2009, 12:44 PM
We're learning IT in my school. It's not Computer Science; it's more like *using* a computer. I don't understand why they're using a product like Microsoft Office when it will probably be out of use or completely different by the time I (and the rest of my class) finish education.

Oh, and my gripe has to be that we use mind-mapping software to design a website. Yes, mind-mapping software. We don't use Notepad, or even Dreamweaver... we use a program designed to help you make ideas and notes (for me, a text editor on an 80x25 screen does the job) to make a website. Ugh.

jimi_hendrix
February 1st, 2009, 03:01 PM
We're learning IT in my school. It's not Computer Science; it's more like *using* a computer. I don't understand why they're using a product like Microsoft Office when it will probably be out of use or completely different by the time I (and the rest of my class) finish education.


the past 8 years where this happened to me were a complete waste when word 2007 came out...now i have to guess or google stuff...thank you school!

hyperdude111
February 1st, 2009, 03:14 PM
Tell him he is wrong then report it to the college THEN drop the class.

hanniph
February 1st, 2009, 06:14 PM
I don't understand why they're using a product like Microsoft Office when it will probably be out of use or completely different by the time I (and the rest of my class) finish education.

IMHO, problem is that they are teaching how to use some particular programs like MS Word, MS Excel etc..(for it me it was MS Office 2000 and MS Office 2003)

I'd prefer the more general way: Telling students things what they can do in those types of programs and then showing them some of how-to's instead of just making them to learn all program's options and dialog boxes by heart. (Well, at least I had to struggle for a couple of days with this before the final exam)

mssever
February 2nd, 2009, 04:38 PM
We're learning IT in my school. It's not Computer Science; it's more like *using* a computer. I don't understand why they're using a product like Microsoft Office when it will probably be out of use or completely different by the time I (and the rest of my class) finish education.
My biggest gripe is when schools teach how to use a particular set of programs, not how to use a computer. The switch to Office 2007 is a good illustration of why. You simply can't count on UIs staying the same for all time.

There is hope, however, at least in some schools. I graduated while ago, but I knew someone who started at my university last year. One of her classes was (the outdatedly-titled) Microcomputer Literacy. Now, I never took that class, because I could have taught it in my sleep and would have been thoroughly bored. Plus, I already knew how to use Word. But by the time my friend took the class, the teacher went to great lengths to use a variety of programs and interfaces in an effort to teach general principles. So they used Office. And OpenOffice. The computers in the lab ran some version of Windows (I don't know whether it was XP or Vista), but one of the assignments was to burn an Ununtu live CD and bring it to class, where they did their work from Linux.

Microcomputer Literacy is a completely non-geeky class designed for those who aren't computer-lovers. But I was impressed at how far the teacher went to expose the students to multiple interfaces. The students will be better prepared now to face the interface of whatever software/OS they end up usingwhether or not it was specifically covered in their class.

lykwydchykyn
February 2nd, 2009, 04:45 PM
When people bring up the "we should teach students the industry-standard software to prepare them for the real world" argument, I always mention that the industry standard software when I was a student was WordPerfect 5 for DOS. A lot of good that expertise would do me...

unoodles
February 2nd, 2009, 06:22 PM
Same thing here at my University.
I am a highschool student, but I take classes at a university instead of a regular highschool.
I guess my professor wasn't quite that bad, but you really can make a huge difference.
Before, we used to be forced to port our C programs to a 2002 version of Metroworks CodeWarrior.
I convinced my professor to have the IT department (where, convienently I work :D), to install CodeBlocks on 100+ computers to replace CodeWarrior.
Not only that, now all the computers are dual boot with ubuntu!

You really should try to change things, it will be good for everyone.

Lux Perpetua
February 2nd, 2009, 06:48 PM
You really should try to change things, it will be good for everyone.That's an idea.

Telling the professor he's wrong won't help on this task, however. It'll make the OP feel good momentarily, sure, but he won't win in the long run with that approach. Keep in mind that the professor has 100% of the power, and the student 0%, so the professor doesn't have to do anything a student suggests. Diplomacy is key.

Tomatz
February 2nd, 2009, 06:52 PM
All right, this is what happened in college today. Quoting from my blog :



Here's the link to the post on my blog, if anybody wants to share it : http://blog.uncool.in/2009/01/19/computer-science-fail-higher-education-in-india/

Now what? Do I tell the guy he's wrong? Telling the college authorities won't help at all because my college is already short of professors and the administration wouldn't even dream of kicking one out.

EDIT: Fixed messed up formatting.

Sh**!

I don't even have a qualification to my name and i know more than that guy ](*,)

bpalone
February 2nd, 2009, 07:51 PM
I'll give you the same advice I gave my own kids.

Give them the answers they want. That doesn't mean you have to agree with them. They control your future at the moment, so be diplomatic.

They were still using punch cards when I was in college (the first time).

Ferrat
February 2nd, 2009, 09:41 PM
I'll give you the same advice I gave my own kids.

Give them the answers they want. That doesn't mean you have to agree with them. They control your future at the moment, so be diplomatic.

They were still using punch cards when I was in college (the first time).

Well that's the safe way I agree but as long as people tolerate false information being learned as facts what's the point? if you don't call him on simple stuff that anyone with a clue would know, then what happens when you get to the stuff that you don't know?

I know teachers hate being corrected (most does anyway) and I've gotten lower grades from some due to explaining stuff they don't get right but I feel it's worth it because most of them (as much as they could) made sure they didn't get it wrong again.

Someone talking crap can ruin your education even if you don't call their BS, but you can be somewhat diplomatic about it, not scream it at the top of your lounges.
Either take it in private or get the facts that are correct and drop a letter explaining that he should look it up :P

lykwydchykyn
February 2nd, 2009, 09:48 PM
If you can't be passionately, uncompromisingly, and unrealistically idealistic to a fault in your college years, when can you be?

Tomosaur
February 3rd, 2009, 09:55 PM
If you can't be passionately, uncompromisingly, and unrealistically idealistic to a fault in your college years, when can you be?

+1

If it were me, I would call my professor out. I don't know how they do things in your part of the world, but I paid for my education and if it's sub-standard, I'm going to raise hell. It's not like they'll just give you your money back if you can't get a job afterwards - you are paying for it and you should get the best your money can buy.

In all honesty - it sounds like this guy shouldn't even be in a job. It is important that somebody in his position knows what the hell he's talking about.

deepclutch
February 4th, 2009, 05:27 PM
this all results due to the weak infrastructure some colleges up north(india) have.I am yet to see such a lecturer.

WitchCraft
February 7th, 2009, 12:50 PM
+1

If it were me, I would call my professor out. I don't know how they do things in your part of the world, but I paid for my education and if it's sub-standard, I'm going to raise hell. It's not like they'll just give you your money back if you can't get a job afterwards - you are paying for it and you should get the best your money can buy.

In all honesty - it sounds like this guy shouldn't even be in a job. It is important that somebody in his position knows what the hell he's talking about.



Tell him he is wrong then report it to the college THEN drop the class.

Sure, if you can afford it, and if it is better somewhere else (in my experience unlikely)...
because if you report it, you certainly have to drop the class...
At least here in Zurich, cannot speak for India, but I assume the people are the same everywhere...

Ferrat
February 7th, 2009, 01:06 PM
Sure, if you can afford it, and if it is better somewhere else (in my experience unlikely)...
because if you report it, you certainly have to drop the class...
At least here in Zurich, cannot speak for India, but I assume the people are the same everywhere...

Why do you have to drop the class? o.O
But I can agree with the afford part, some people have to pay for their education and limits ones ability to make a fuzz but still even worse if you are paying for it and the quality is sub-par =(

EDIT:
Just checked the costs in India, they aren't huge really but you are still paying for it and if you're making minimum wage in India and is categorized as unskilled then it takes a while to accumulate the fees, if you don't get a descent education for that then you are just getting ripped off losing your hard earned money and even if you have a few perks in life and the money isn't that much to you then out of respect for you friends that might have to work hard to afford the education

WitchCraft
February 7th, 2009, 02:10 PM
JS isn't necessarily bad for search engine rankings. It depends on how you use it.

Exactly that's what I mean.
Write on version for Mozilla, another one for MS, one with frames, one without frames, don't use links in JS, mind the IE JS interface, etc., etc. ...

Unusable.



Java doesn't necessarily force you into proprietary territory; neither do some other bytecode languages such as Python. And it depends on your application for whether you'd have a long load time (at least for Python; I can't speak for Java).

OK, there are various Java bytecode interpreters, some open. But some is not enough. Plus differences between the various interpreters, and their own version btw, as well as poor runtime performance and so-called portability make the Java language almost unusable.

Python as bytecode? Well you can compile it to bytecode, if you want, but it is basically an interpreted scripting language, which is fine. I have nothing against Python (except that it uses whitespaces for block separation...). If I run Python scripts, I always run the as interpreted scripts, and not as bytecode. Plus as I am working with Python on various platforms, and I noticed some poratilibty issues. Fortunately by far not as severe as Java, though...

Besides, with "bytecode things" I was refering to .Net mainly, Java second, and not to Python.

kcode
February 10th, 2009, 12:15 PM
Just keep correcting him and probing for more info when you feel he is wrong. :) (personal opinion, of course)

Well, that might strain student teacher relationship! And the teacher may threaten to fail him in exams. Thats how teachers in India work. And all those who are good ones, go abroad to teach.
And yeah...self learning is the best way to learn :-).

nvteighen
February 10th, 2009, 01:48 PM
I guess you'll have to learn diplomacy, if you can't change college. Be patient, do what he tells you to do but learn on your own. Of course, help your mates to do the same.

Otherwise, you'll trap yourself in a very nasty situation. The teacher has the over-all academic power in a class and by correcting him, you may get a bad surprise at the end of the class... or you may not, but the risk is too much IMO: too much to lose, too little to win.

Of course, it depends on what kind of person your teacher is. Maybe he can accept his failures and then, well, things will be much easier. My advice above is just a general law derived from my experiences, but there can be exceptions.

CptPicard
February 10th, 2009, 02:42 PM
OK, there are various Java bytecode interpreters, some open. But some is not enough. Plus differences between the various interpreters, and their own version btw, as well as poor runtime performance and so-called portability make the Java language almost unusable.

These differences are overblown. Sun Java is the most common one these days at least on the client, differences between versions are no big deal at least after the 1.4->1.5+ switch... and runtime performance is, according to my own experience, the best among "not statically native compiled languages", substantially so, too.

I don't quite get the portability complaints either -- either you have really big portability problems if you don't use something like Java, or you get some marginal portability problems if you do... it's a tradeoff. My own stuff runs happily on both Linux and Windows at least (development on Linux, deployment on Windows boxes), and I really have not run into any issues yet...



Python as bytecode? Well you can compile it to bytecode, if you want, but it is basically an interpreted scripting language, which is fine.

Python compiles everything into bytecode on the fly on first run, then caches the bytecode for subsequent executions. It's always JIT-compiled.

Circus-Killer
February 10th, 2009, 02:56 PM
All right, this is what happened in college today. Quoting from my blog :



Here's the link to the post on my blog, if anybody wants to share it : http://blog.uncool.in/2009/01/19/computer-science-fail-higher-education-in-india/

Now what? Do I tell the guy he's wrong? Telling the college authorities won't help at all because my college is already short of professors and the administration wouldn't even dream of kicking one out.

EDIT: Fixed messed up formatting.

well, i know how you feel. i studied 3 years for my diploma. in the third-year i had a complete retard for a network communications lecturer. actually, he had his doctorate. but still, he was 100% sure ip addresses are ***.***.*** instead of ***.***.***.***

this is just one error, but there were many more. now im the type of guy who if i think somethings wrong, i will say so. i even tune my boss kak when i think he's wrong.

but this is about my professor. he was so bad, that i actually had to mention in every test/exam that the question is wrong and cant be answered because his facts within the question were completely wrong.

needless to say, he failed me, two years in a row. nevermind the fact that i was a top student in 2 of my classes, and finished fourth in 3rd year project day. so now here i am, 3 years later, and still no diploma. i actually gave up on it. i now focus on just earning international certifications. if in any future interview they should ask why i didnt finish my diploma, i will simply answer that it was completely sub-standard. i dont see why i had to pay so much money to learn.....


VB6 (when .NET had been out for 2 years already)
ASP 3.0 (again, when .NET was already out)
absolutely nothing of PHP, despite it being an industry standard and this was a web development diploma
third-year stuff that in other institutions were being taught in first year (explain how i just sailed through the other classes)


i guess in developing countries, its more about trying to put as many people in jobs, regardless of whether they have the capabilities or not. but hey, im just tryna make the best out of the situation.

to the OP, seriously consider international certification. the actual training courses are expensive, but you dont need to do them to complete the exams. i myself simply get the required text-books i need and teach myself. when i feel confident enough, i write the exam. and by the sounds of things you are the type of person who would achieve far more this way then trying to be tought by someone as thickly stupid as your lecturer.