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View Full Version : Strong all in one web development kits for beginers



deadlockedgamer
January 16th, 2009, 05:05 PM
Hi, I have been asked to find an open source website creation tool that makes web development simple for beginners and allows for easy customization.Preferably I want one to run under ubuntu 8.1 and I am going to be learning how to make websites but don't know anything about HTML and the person helping me knows just enough to get by. I would like to make professional looking web pages. Is there such a tool freely available? If so which is the most suited. The easier the user interface the better.

cerealtx
January 16th, 2009, 05:07 PM
umm only thing i can think of is bluefish editor but don't expect anything like dreamweaver, but if u want to make strong compact webpages i suggest using gedit to code all your pages, front end editors have lots of fun flash stuff but ur not learning, i would suggest using http://www.w3.org/MarkUp/Guide/ w3 has great tutorials on web based languages

chrisod
January 16th, 2009, 10:55 PM
Kompozer isn't too bad as a beginner's HTML editor.

deadlockedgamer
January 19th, 2009, 02:59 AM
Thank you both I will check them out but would like to clarify that I would like to be able to drag and drop items and put them how I want and have the software create the html for me if possible.

Bachstelze
January 19th, 2009, 03:02 AM
Moved to Programming Talk.

Reiger
January 19th, 2009, 03:47 AM
As you're a beginner you may not be aware but you have stated (almost) contradictionary goals/requirements:

Want to make a professional looking webpage => Want to make a webpage which works not just on Microsoft Internet Explorer but also on Firefox, Opera... (use http://browsershots.org/ if you can, it's a time saving treasure trove...)

Want drag/drop elements + auto-generated code => WhatYouSeeIsWhatYouGet altough it might've been renamed WhatYouSeeIsMerelyWhatYouThinkYouGet. Kompozer from what I heard seems to do a decent job at generating reasonable-good code (i.e. code which works consistently accross different browsers); but Dreamwaver/MS Word... oh, my... (it's one of those apps which have made a WYSIWYG pretty much "that which thou shalt *never* use"!)

However, you're almost bound to run into trouble even with a decent WYSIWYG editor such as Kompozer because you wanted _professional_ pages. There is a lot of design going on in proper professional page which is hidden from you but which serves to enable you to code certain items *only once* yet avoid deprecated constructs such as frames.

module0000
January 19th, 2009, 04:09 AM
As you're a beginner you may not be aware but you have stated (almost) contradictionary goals/requirements:

Want to make a professional looking webpage => Want to make a webpage which works not just on Microsoft Internet Explorer but also on Firefox, Opera... (use http://browsershots.org/ if you can, it's a time saving treasure trove...)

Want drag/drop elements + auto-generated code => WhatYouSeeIsWhatYouGet altough it might've been renamed WhatYouSeeIsMerelyWhatYouThinkYouGet. Kompozer from what I heard seems to do a decent job at generating reasonable-good code (i.e. code which works consistently accross different browsers); but Dreamwaver/MS Word... oh, my... (it's one of those apps which have made a WYSIWYG pretty much "that which thou shalt *never* use"!)

However, you're almost bound to run into trouble even with a decent WYSIWYG editor such as Kompozer because you wanted _professional_ pages. There is a lot of design going on in proper professional page which is hidden from you but which serves to enable you to code certain items *only once* yet avoid deprecated constructs such as frames.

Reiger summed it up perfect. "professional" looking websites are created by professionals that understand and can tweak the code generated by the IDE's they use(i.e. dreamweaver, bluefish, wysiwyg in general).

Also, consider what you mean when you say "professional looking" web pages. Ever heard of a website called "Google"? It's one picture and a text box on a plain white background. You don't have to have 5 imagemaps and a load of embedded flash for your site to be usable.

Your best bet is to learn HTML, it doesn't take long, and it will remove the limitations imposed on your creativity by IDE's such as Dreamweaver.

NinjaWork
January 19th, 2009, 01:07 PM
You can look into using a content management system (CMS). Drupal is great, but has a bit of a learning curve and it is better if you are running your own server.

.Maleficus.
January 19th, 2009, 03:07 PM
You can look into using a content management system (CMS). Drupal is great, but has a bit of a learning curve and it is better if you are running your own server.
+1 to the CMS idea. If you need a quick fix with a really nice, professional looking site, a CMS with pre-made templates the the easiest and fastest (of course it doesn't hurt to learn XHTML, CSS and Ajax yourself).

I've never used Drupal but I used Joomla! on a site before and it's fantastic. Thousands of plugins for almost anything you can imagine and thousands of user-created themes that can be easily modified.

deadlockedgamer
January 19th, 2009, 05:56 PM
Well thank you sorry about the contradictions. I wanted to be able to ad cool objects and I just am loaded with school work and never learned html. I guess I will try some of these content managers and learn some coding. Thank you so much and sorry if my question seemed stupid.

prkos
January 21st, 2009, 03:41 AM
I'm a web developer and I use Eclipse with Aptana plugin (you can use Aptana without Eclipse if you're on 32bit machine). Aptana is feature packed, it's not for web dev only, but that was the only (free) editor that satisfied my needs.

Some of the features that are great for beginners is warnings when you make a typo and code suggestions (when you start typing something you get a popup with possible tags/selectors/attributes so you don't have to type every letter and ; Aptana does it for you, it speeds up the work and frees your mind to think of more important stuff while coding).

I agree with the above statements about professional web sites, you can't get anywhere with wysiwyg editors these days, even Dreamweaver shifted focus more towards code and less towards wysiwyg. Think about what you really want, if you want to be a professional web dev and do this for a living you'll probably need to spend at least a year of learning it.

If you need to create a website quickly without much code knowledge try one of the CMSs, I use Drupal. You'll need to know about setting a database to install it but once you get it up creating content is easy and it's very well documented so you just follow the instructions. You won't be able to visually style it your way unless you know the code but maybe you can find a ready made theme you can use.

btw there are no stupid questions, just answers ;)