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bonfire89
January 15th, 2009, 10:02 AM
Text Editors vs. IDEs

I'm aware of the benefits of both, perhaps I'm lacking a bit of knowledge about the text editors though

But. What is better to program in, an IDE or a text editor?

I realize this will be opinionated.

I'm somewhat trying to convince myself into using a text editor, but it really seems they are starting to get dated =/

I have ~8 years programming experience, and have worked with too many different languages (hence why I am not proficient in any) but am being forced to learn Java currently if that makes a difference.... and I don't already know a text editor well.

Lets not discuss specific IDEs or text editors.. that will probably just spiral out of control.

Kilon
January 15th, 2009, 11:24 AM
Text Editors vs. IDEs

I'm aware of the benefits of both, perhaps I'm lacking a bit of knowledge about the text editors though

But. What is better to program in, an IDE or a text editor?

I realize this will be opinionated.

I'm somewhat trying to convince myself into using a text editor, but it really seems they are starting to get dated =/

I have ~8 years programming experience, and have worked with too many different languages (hence why I am not proficient in any) but am being forced to learn Java currently if that makes a difference.... and I don't already know a text editor well.

Lets not discuss specific IDEs or text editors.. that will probably just spiral out of control.

IDEs are the intelligent way of doing things. The more advanced the IDE , the better it is. It will save you loads of time. Avoid programming bits that they can be made with simple drag n drop. You can always return and edit the code the way you like it and make sense to you. Avoid IDEs that put code that does not make sense or is not necessary for you.

jimi_hendrix
January 15th, 2009, 01:19 PM
depends on the language...java swing stuff = ide for me
c/c++/almost everyother language = text editor

Magnes
January 15th, 2009, 01:20 PM
PHP - I prefer text editor, everything else - IDE. :)

maximinus_uk
January 15th, 2009, 02:38 PM
Emacs - Text editor and IDE ;)

hanniph
January 15th, 2009, 05:18 PM
Emacs - Text editor and IDE
Same with vim

vambo
January 15th, 2009, 05:22 PM
emacs - text editor and ide ;)

+1

Sockerdrickan
January 15th, 2009, 05:43 PM
gedit

don't learn an ide, learn how to program

TheOrangePeanut
January 15th, 2009, 06:27 PM
When I first migrated to Linux, I preferred text editors and command line compilation and debugging even though I used IDEs in Windows. Nowadays, though, I've gone back to IDEs. There are too many amenities I miss, including code completion, drag-and-drop guis, visual debuggers, visual class editors, etc.

happysmileman
January 15th, 2009, 08:29 PM
Much prefer IDE, but don't like the idea of an IDE generating any code for the project (I'm not sure where I stand on UI designers, especially Qt ones which let you control signals and slots too, they DO make things a lot easier but I imagine any bug introduced while using it would be hell to fix. :P), I do however like code completion and syntax highlighting (syntax highlighting is in text editors anyway).

Also love being able to click "New KDE/SDL/Qt/Console project" and it'll make a basic program set up with the right librarys and include folders, and being able to compile/run at the push of a button.

I don't see any real advantage of text editors, since an IDE can do everything they do and more, I guess text editors are lighter and use less screen space I guess.

Simian Man
January 15th, 2009, 08:37 PM
If you are developing in a language that has an IDE and use a design that is compatible with that IDE then they are great. However as soon as you do something different, you will run into problems and end up fighting your tools. For example I was working on a C++ project in MSVC (this was a while ago) and I ended up wanting to embed a simple control language in it. Trying to use lex and yacc with the MSVC build system was a bitch and I had to abandon MSVC for gvim and Mingw.

A current project I am working on uses C, Ocaml, Ocamlyacc, Ocamllex and scheme. Think any IDE can handle that??

snova
January 15th, 2009, 11:56 PM
Personally, I think IDE's are more useful for compiled languages, where it becomes helpful to offload the build system, integrate the debugger, and so on. (Yeah, I know Emacs can do most of this. ;)) I especially liked how Eclipse would automatically rebuild every time you saved.

But for interpreted languages, I don't think they're nearly as useful. Nothing needs to be done in preparation to run the program except a simple "python main.py" or whatever. And since I spend much of my time in a terminal anyway.

lensman3
January 16th, 2009, 01:46 AM
vim and "control-Z" in a text window for multiple vim sessions. Use the "fg" command to retrieve the "stopped" vim sessions. Use the "jobs" command to find which vim session to return to the fore-ground. Be sure to write the file just before you "control-Z". It is very easy to get five to ten edit session (all on different files) going at the same time.

Learn "make" and "touch".

jimi_hendrix
January 16th, 2009, 01:49 AM
btw...vim ftw

imdano
January 16th, 2009, 01:54 AM
If I'm working on a large project with many files/classes I usually go for an IDE, regardless of the language. If I'm just editing a couple of files I usually go with vim.

Sorivenul
January 16th, 2009, 06:10 AM
I use a text editor for most work (won't say which, but I've put in my two cents on the issue a few times...). Any work I do in Java I do in an IDE, though, because it makes my life easier. It depends on your needs and the language(s) you are using.

iQuizzle
January 16th, 2009, 06:36 AM
i use kate and i always liked the syntax highlighting..but i doubt that i'd really use any of the features in an ide beyond that...although i have a friend who is a full-time php developer and swears by his ide, so i don't doubt that they're useful.

krazyd
January 16th, 2009, 08:03 AM
i use kate and i always liked the syntax highlighting..but i doubt that i'd really use any of the features in an ide beyond that...although i have a friend who is a full-time php developer and swears by his ide, so i don't doubt that they're useful.
I used to use kate and gvim, but have switched to kate almost exclusively now that it has a Vi input mode (http://hamberg.no/erlend/2008/11/24/the-vi-input-mode-for-kate-is-done/).

spupy
January 16th, 2009, 11:35 AM
For Java I use eclipse, nothing special.
For C/Python/Bash - Geany. But I mostly use it as more of a text editor, for the highlighting, the sidebar browser and some other standart editing features. I do the compiling and running in a console (that I tab onto the geany window - it's a fluxbox feature). Also I tweaked the interface of Geany to make it more minimalistic and hide the functions I don't use.

hessiess
January 16th, 2009, 12:38 PM
same with vim

+1

For the most part I dislike IDE'ws because they blast you with tonnes of features your never lickly to use, so just waste screen space. But because everything in vim is hidden behind a command line, it can have an infinite number of features without stupid GIU garbage tacking up my pressious screen real estate ;)

Haiyadragon
January 16th, 2009, 12:43 PM
I use Eclipse for Java and PHP. Geany for everything else (Python, Ruby and C++ among others).

Eclipse is a resource hog but there are several features that are just to convenient to go without. Autocomplete with documentation of available methods and their parameters and quickly finding and opening a file by typing a (partial) name, I use a lot.

bonfire89
January 19th, 2009, 01:41 PM
Very interesting, thanks for the replies.

I suppose it does in deed come down to "it depends" however it seems there is a leaning towards an IDE unless you are concerned about extra resources or perhaps screen real estate.

I figure I will use an IDE right now... hopefully I can turn code completion off since I am just about to start learning java (not programming) and should familiarize myself with the libraries.

Part of the reason I even posed the question was because if I went the text editor route I would learn the keybindings, however I discovered that these key bindings are often built into the IDEs too!

I still have some research to do now on IDEs but it seems that IDEs encompass everything that text editors are and more... however with the cost of computer resources. As happysmileman says,


I don't see any real advantage of text editors, since an IDE can do everything they do and more, I guess text editors are lighter and use less screen space I guess.

So, using an IDE while making an effort to use the keybindings of an advanced text editor I will be in a way killing two birds with one stone which will allow me to efficiently use a text editor in the future if no gui is available or I decide the increase resource usage is un-justified.

Thanks again :)

Sorivenul
January 19th, 2009, 04:00 PM
I figure I will use an IDE right now... hopefully I can turn code completion off since I am just about to start learning java (not programming) and should familiarize myself with the libraries.

If you want an IDE for Java, Netbeans gets my vote. Others may say Eclipse, and again it is a matter of choice. Disabling code completion, IMO, would be a bad decision. Java is a very involved, complex language, with a huge number of likewise involved, complex libraries, and code completion really helps demystify the Java programming process. After four years of Java, I still use code completion. Again, this is just my opinion, and you are welcome to turn of code completion and use whatever IDE you like. Good luck!

bonfire89
January 22nd, 2009, 02:32 PM
If you want an IDE for Java, Netbeans gets my vote. Others may say Eclipse, and again it is a matter of choice. Disabling code completion, IMO, would be a bad decision. Java is a very involved, complex language, with a huge number of likewise involved, complex libraries, and code completion really helps demystify the Java programming process. After four years of Java, I still use code completion. Again, this is just my opinion, and you are welcome to turn of code completion and use whatever IDE you like. Good luck!

hehe, Yeah, I have netbeans and eclipse. Shrugs shrugs. Not-going-there. hehe.

I agree that code completion is generally good. Whenever asp.net came out I worked with it for a couple years using visual studio.net and the code completion was very useful for not knowing precisely the names of functions, parameters etc.

But, being that I am take Java in school right now, that includes hand written paper tests which means I need to know the stuff perfectly. Code completion for a later date :) Or when I leave an assignment to the last minute.

Circus-Killer
January 22nd, 2009, 02:39 PM
it also comes down to personal preference as well. many people will say IDE is necessary for big projects. i disagree. there has not been a single project too big that i've needed an IDE.

i find that using a plain text editor (scite), i find i can follow the flow of the program much better. but thats mostly cos i keep the flow in my head, rather than have an IDE dictate the flow to me.

also the size of IDE's is a drawback for me. i also get lost in IDE's. spend more time clicking and navigating the IDE than coding. i dont know. i guess its just my preference. all my colleagues use IDE's. i'm the only one who uses a text editor. but as said three times over, its more about personal choice and how the person in question feels they need to deal with the task.

bonfire89
January 22nd, 2009, 02:53 PM
I like the idea of using a text editor, but the debugging tools and code completion seem really handy in terms of the IDE.

Although, I could probably learn more about command line debuggers, and I have seen a few things out there about code completion and emacs.

I have also decided on learning emacs key bindings IDE or not. It seems like emacs key bindings are easier to set up, and more widely accessible to IDEs such as Eclipse. I can easily set up emacs keybindings in Eclipse, and the stuff I saw about Vi keybindings in IDEs seems sketchy. From a quick search emacs key bindings is even available in Visual Studio which I could end up using at some point in my life.

spupy
January 23rd, 2009, 01:06 AM
Eclipse is double-edged sword. It helps me tremendously with developing Java software.
Then there is the fact that it takes care of too much stuff - classpath & imports, versioning, compiling and running the program, many more. When I try to work on a project and do these action without eclipse, something is bound to not work and I'm out of luck - I can only return to eclipse.

bruce89
January 23rd, 2009, 01:14 AM
For Java I use eclipse, nothing special.
For C/Python/Bash - Geany. But I mostly use it as more of a text editor, for the highlighting, the sidebar browser and some other standart editing features. I do the compiling and running in a console (that I tab onto the geany window - it's a fluxbox feature). Also I tweaked the interface of Geany to make it more minimalistic and hide the functions I don't use.

That sounds like a useful thing in general. When I looked at Geany, I almost exploded.

Eclipse for Java, gedit for anything else. I have been testing the development version of Anjuta, I might use it for C et al. once I switch to Jaunty (or Fedora 11).

Kilon
January 23rd, 2009, 05:31 PM
http://imgs.xkcd.com/comics/real_programmers.png

Sprut1
January 23rd, 2009, 05:36 PM
I use both, when I'm working on "bigger" projects I use Eclipse, but if I'm just going to write one short simple script that takes a string and prints it out backwards I'd rather use Kate or any text editor.

mmix
January 24th, 2009, 02:33 PM
Lets not discuss specific IDEs or text editors.. that will probably just spiral out of control.

Excuse me, But no discussion about specific IDEs or text editors seems your problem.

Darkspark
January 24th, 2009, 05:33 PM
The thing about IDEs are that they contain their very own version of a text editor. So IDEs are a packaged deal that allows you to edit and compile and debug your code all in one place. Basically, an IDE is better, especially from a programmer's point-of-view.

glok_twen
January 24th, 2009, 08:26 PM
+1 on ide's for most practical situations these days. it's just too much easier to bounce between design docs, data files, web pages, multiple open threads, etc.

now my sarcastic answer would have been:

- wanna-be programmers use an ide
- real programmers use emacs
- elite programmers use vi sans any plugins
- truly exceptional programmers write the raw binary code by hand in ed:
http://www.g-brain.net/tutorials/writing-linux-programs-in-raw-binary.txt

:cool:

Sorivenul
January 24th, 2009, 09:32 PM
now my sarcastic answer would have been:
[Trimmed...]
You must have missed this post (http://ubuntuforums.org/showpost.php?p=6603404&postcount=29)... :D

JMJ_coder
January 24th, 2009, 10:57 PM
It really depends on what you're doing. I couldn't imagine coding JAVA without an IDE that could autocomplete java.someThing.whatEver.thisIsVeryInane.finallyThe TrueFunction(take string); :shock:


But, I don't do JAVA programming! I find that I can more quickly edit files, compile, and debug using cli tools -- (n)vi, pcc, gdb, etc.

I can quickly move back and forth (either with multiple TTY's or with a program such as window or screen) between programs and I never have to take my hands off of the keyboard. Who can use an IDE without a mouse?

bonfire89
February 14th, 2009, 05:00 AM
It really depends on what you're doing. I couldn't imagine coding JAVA without an IDE that could autocomplete java.someThing.whatEver.thisIsVeryInane.finallyThe TrueFunction(take string); :shock:


LOL, 3 weeks into learning Java, I think I am going to develop hand problems typing System.out.print over and over and over. grrr, I didn't appreciate it at the time while I was forced to learn c++, but, now I really like it and wish I was using it at the moment.

Thesuperchang
February 14th, 2009, 05:21 AM
VB6 - I used that Microsoft IDE it came with. It made for a very good RAD approach.

C - I jumped between Quincy when in windows and Gedit when in Linux. Overall I prefer Gedit due to its lightweight style. I found Quincy to be feasible however I did not care for whatever other features it had. Makefiles were just fine for me.

C++ - Gedit. This really comes down to how well you're prepared to organise your projects.

Java - I use Netbeans for this language. I feel more at home with an IDE when it comes to larger languages.

Assembly - I've never done anything flamboyant in assembly. I only resort to assembly when; I need some extra speed that C could not provide. I don't have a C/++ assembler for a target platform.

In short, IDE's can either help or hinder depending upon the project and language. Sort of like the choice between using C and C++.

yse
February 14th, 2009, 10:44 AM
Text Editors vs. IDEs

I'm aware of the benefits of both, perhaps I'm lacking a bit of knowledge about the text editors though

But. What is better to program in, an IDE or a text editor?

I realize this will be opinionated.

I'm somewhat trying to convince myself into using a text editor, but it really seems they are starting to get dated =/

I have ~8 years programming experience, and have worked with too many different languages (hence why I am not proficient in any) but am being forced to learn Java currently if that makes a difference.... and I don't already know a text editor well.

Lets not discuss specific IDEs or text editors.. that will probably just spiral out of control.


In our development environment we are lost if we use just simple text editor.

We really need an IDE. Picture a project where we have hundreds and hundred of classes, and is under source control. With out an ide and good source parsers for classes we are just lost. Not to mention refractory at all levels.

Imho text editing is for newbies or for peoples who want to show how good programmers they are... my opinion...

ajackson
February 14th, 2009, 10:55 AM
In our development environment we are lost if we use just simple text editor.

We really need an IDE. Picture a project where we have hundreds and hundred of classes, and is under source control. With out an ide and good source parsers for classes we are just lost. Not to mention refractory at all levels.
I'm assuming you are refering to code completion (or what ever the correct term is), that is the best feature in most IDEs and certainly helps when you are using a class that you aren't too familiar with.

Being under source control, however, shouldn't have any bearing on whether you use a text editor or an IDE, unless it is integrated into the IDE, then I could see the advantage.

I'm a bit mixed about what is better as in some cases a text editor will do (ie sticking a quick print debugging line in), unless the compile is very simple or controlled by a makefile or other such building script then the IDE lets you build with the click of a button.

Debugging is often integral to an IDE so sometimes stepping through code is the only way of finding that strange logic bug.

yse
February 14th, 2009, 11:12 AM
I'm assuming you are refering to code completion (or what ever the correct term is), that is the best feature in most IDEs and certainly helps when you are using a class that you aren't too familiar with.

Being under source control, however, shouldn't have any bearing on whether you use a text editor or an IDE, unless it is integrated into the IDE, then I could see the advantage.

I'm a bit mixed about what is better as in some cases a text editor will do (ie sticking a quick print debugging line in), unless the compile is very simple or controlled by a makefile or other such building script then the IDE lets you build with the click of a button.

Debugging is often integral to an IDE so sometimes stepping through code is the only way of finding that strange logic bug.

Well, code completion, refractoring, class view, code profiling, object inspectors and so on. I am talking mostly about OO programming, we let "C" for other era.

As i told you, we have hundreds of classes and lots of name spaces, simple text editor just dont cut it. Not counting that parts of the code is updates almost every day via source control.. for me simple text editing is just out of discussion.

ajackson
February 14th, 2009, 11:24 AM
Well, code completion, refractoring, class view, code profiling, object inspectors and so on. I am talking mostly about OO programming, we let "C" for other era.
Who mentioned C? I haven't written much C for quite a while now :)


As i told you, we have hundreds of classes and lots of name spaces, simple text editor just dont cut it. Not counting that parts of the code is updates almost every day via source control.. for me simple text editing is just out of discussion.
Calm down, I wasn't rubbishing what you said, I was expressing my opinion, for your usage an IDE is the best tool for the job so I don't expect you to use a text editor. For what I do I can get away at times with just using a text editor (in fact sometimes I have to make do with a text editor) but would use an IDE when I had need to, doesn't make me any better/worse than you.

nvteighen
February 14th, 2009, 12:39 PM
Debugging is often integral to an IDE so sometimes stepping through code is the only way of finding that strange logic bug.

Hmm... gdb can step through the code.



(gdb) >


I really don't see the point of IDEs outside the project managing tools they have and the GUI designing tools. People say Java needs and IDE, but I don't use that language, so I can't speak on my own.

ajackson
February 14th, 2009, 12:47 PM
Hmm... gdb can step through the code.
This is where I come up with a very good reason why I forgot about gdb without making myself look silly. Erm forget it, look silly because I forgot about gdb :)


I really don't see the point of IDEs outside the project managing tools they have and the GUI designing tools. People say Java needs and IDE, but I don't use that language, so I can't speak on my own.
They are useful tools, using one or not using one doesn't necessarily reflect on the programmer. I worked for a firm that insisted I used the IDE because it handled the formatting of the code better (I kid you not). But they are tools, like text editors, command line utilities, etc and you should use the tools you feel are right for the job IMHO.

dwhitney67
February 14th, 2009, 01:21 PM
Well, code completion, refractoring, class view, code profiling, object inspectors and so on. I am talking mostly about OO programming, we let "C" for other era.

As i told you, we have hundreds of classes and lots of name spaces, simple text editor just dont cut it. Not counting that parts of the code is updates almost every day via source control.. for me simple text editing is just out of discussion.

If you are developing the source for a single class object, and it interfaces with "hundreds" of other classes, then IMHO, you are developing a "kitchen sink".

yse
February 14th, 2009, 01:24 PM
If you are developing the source for a single class object, and it interfaces with "hundreds" of other classes, then IMHO, you are developing a "kitchen sink".

Nice try, unfortunately, you didnt understand what i said.

CptPicard
February 14th, 2009, 05:45 PM
It really depends. Sometimes a text editor is lightweight enough, but apart from niceties such as code completion and automated refactorings -- which are really cool btw, my development in Java progresses through refactoring steps these days mostly -- it is the project management and tool integration that makes things like Netbeans so useful.

For example just last week I was reverse-engineering a database into an object model, and then tuning that model into something a bit smarter than what the automated tool comes up with. The fact that the entire stack from database through mappings to Java objects is under IDE control saves a lot of time -- all of this would have been so much slower if I had had to do things the old-fashioned way of writing an ant script and typing up all the Java and mappings all the way by hand... I don't even want to think about that frankly.

Of course the question can be asked how using a higher-level language such as Python would tie into this... essentially, TurboGears+SQLAlchemy does similar things just with a text editor, as the entire project size is smaller. I have strong feel that a lot of the need for IDE comes from issues with the language, but at least in static-typed OOP, IDEs are a saviour.

napsy
February 14th, 2009, 06:09 PM
vim+cscope+nerdtree .. a total win.

u497
February 14th, 2009, 10:03 PM
ides are good for flexibility sometimes sometimes not.
for little projects while you know what is where best is text editors.
ides are good for fnding fucntions identifying them ...
other then that plain text editors are allways better because they are faster and easy to use.:lolflag:

Greyed
February 15th, 2009, 11:18 AM
I think the question itself is worthless. IDEs, at their core, must be text editors. Without that functionality they fall flat.

The real question is why every IDE feels compelled to reinvent the wheel instead of incorporate tried-and-true editors. Why must I, for example, get by with a half-baked implementation of the VIM keyset when they could, I dunno, use VIM? It is open source, not like they can't integrate it somehow. I applaud some IDEs (Komodo Edit, WingIDE are the ones I am familiar with) attempting to create vim bindings. The problem is that it takes me, a vim neophyte, about 10 minutes to run into missing commands for which I have to go digging through the menus.

But then I blame both Microsoft and the web in equal measure for this sorry state of affairs. Look at the editor we're using to write these messages and ask yourself why the browser has reimplemented the wheel, poorly, for us to post on web forums which themselves are reimplementing mailing lists, poorly, which in turn are only fair substitutes for newsgroups.

howlingmadhowie
February 15th, 2009, 11:30 AM
It really depends. Sometimes a text editor is lightweight enough, but apart from niceties such as code completion and automated refactorings -- which are really cool btw, my development in Java progresses through refactoring steps these days mostly -- it is the project management and tool integration that makes things like Netbeans so useful.

For example just last week I was reverse-engineering a database into an object model, and then tuning that model into something a bit smarter than what the automated tool comes up with. The fact that the entire stack from database through mappings to Java objects is under IDE control saves a lot of time -- all of this would have been so much slower if I had had to do things the old-fashioned way of writing an ant script and typing up all the Java and mappings all the way by hand... I don't even want to think about that frankly.

Of course the question can be asked how using a higher-level language such as Python would tie into this... essentially, TurboGears+SQLAlchemy does similar things just with a text editor, as the entire project size is smaller. I have strong feel that a lot of the need for IDE comes from issues with the language, but at least in static-typed OOP, IDEs are a saviour.

what he said :)

for webpages in a language beginning with p i can't really see the point of an ide. for java you need it. now if java supported duck typing and didn't rely on xml as a format for configuration files, this need would go down dramatically. in fact i'd probably say that the number one reason for using an ide is xml. it's so horribly verbose and human-unfriendly that you need processing power which 10 years ago would have been called big-iron to edit it at acceptable speed. and all that for configuration files, i dunno :sad:

that and static typing, but that's a rant for another day.

howlingmadhowie
February 15th, 2009, 11:36 AM
Why must I, for example, get by with a half-baked implementation of the VIM keyset when they could, I dunno, use VIM?
...

But then I blame both Microsoft and the web in equal measure for this sorry state of affairs. Look at the editor we're using to write these messages and ask yourself why the browser has reimplemented the wheel, poorly, for us to post on web forums which themselves are reimplementing mailing lists, poorly, which in turn are only fair substitutes for newsgroups.

oh i feel your pain. where i used to work i was forced to use eclipse for every bit of code i wrote. it was a nightmare. 2GB of RAM so i could write a shell script. and the emacs key bindings were equally terrible.

it would be great if firefox came in a number of versions like firefox/vi, firefox/emacs or whatever so you could use your favorite text editor to edit <textarea>s. hang on, haven't i seen an add-on for that?

here it is: clickity (https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/4125). now to try it out...

CptPicard
February 15th, 2009, 11:53 AM
now if java supported duck typing and didn't rely on xml as a format for configuration files, this need would go down dramatically.

Actually, Java has been migrating away from XML and into annotations in recent years. In modern Enterprise Java, for example, XML files have been mostly banished! :)

Interestingly, annotations provide richer introspection/reflection support... so it is yet another move towards runtime object inspection, a.k.a. duck typing. Stuff is just simply moved from XML files that need to be specifically synchronized by some tool to the code, to the code itself, from which it can be looked at at will.

spupy
February 15th, 2009, 12:37 PM
I think the question itself is worthless. IDEs, at their core, must be text editors. Without that functionality they fall flat.

The real question is why every IDE feels compelled to reinvent the wheel instead of incorporate tried-and-true editors. Why must I, for example, get by with a half-baked implementation of the VIM keyset when they could, I dunno, use VIM? It is open source, not like they can't integrate it somehow. I applaud some IDEs (Komodo Edit, WingIDE are the ones I am familiar with) attempting to create vim bindings. The problem is that it takes me, a vim neophyte, about 10 minutes to run into missing commands for which I have to go digging through the menus.


What you said reminded me of this:
http://pida.co.uk/
It's an IDE written in python. The interesting thing is that the editor part of the program uses either vim or Emacs.

CptPicard
February 15th, 2009, 01:02 PM
An "Emacs" written in ... Python..? Blasphemy, I say!

Greyed
February 15th, 2009, 01:18 PM
What you said reminded me of this:
http://pida.co.uk/
It's an IDE written in python. The interesting thing is that the editor part of the program is either vim or Emacs.

... In the immortal words of the venerable and totally awesome thespian, Keanu Reeves....

Whoa!

spupy
February 15th, 2009, 01:29 PM
An "Emacs" written in ... Python..? Blasphemy, I say!

A clarification. It uses emacs or vim as its editor, it doesn't reimplement them. :)