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badperson
January 4th, 2009, 04:49 AM
Hi,

was wondering if anyone had some good recomendations for books, not dealing with a particular language. Either, general books like "The Art of Computer Programming", which is over my head, but on my list to start working thru, probably next year.

I read a really good biography of bill gates that came out in 1993, but was wondering if anyone could recommend a more recent one.

I read a profile of google, which was ok, but not as good a read as the bill gates bio.

favorite books?
bp

kavon89
January 4th, 2009, 07:11 AM
Why and how would a biography of Bill Gates or how Google started up help you become a better programmer?

T2manner
January 4th, 2009, 07:16 AM
This (http://search.barnesandnoble.com/Python-Programming/John-M-Zelle/e/9781887902991/?itm=1) book is really good. It introduces you to computer science and programming by teaching you Python.
It's a great book for absolute beginners like myself.

efexD
January 4th, 2009, 07:16 AM
Hi,

was wondering if anyone had some good recomendations for books, not dealing with a particular language. Either, general books like "The Art of Computer Programming", which is over my head, but on my list to start working thru, probably next year.

I read a really good biography of bill gates that came out in 1993, but was wondering if anyone could recommend a more recent one.

I read a profile of google, which was ok, but not as good a read as the bill gates bio.

favorite books?
bp

You sure you know the correct definition of programming?
Maybe you're confused with the history of windows?


Why and how would a biography of Bill Gates or how Google started up help you become a better programmer?

I was wondering the same.

roelpeeters
January 4th, 2009, 08:20 PM
Here's my take:

Programming Pearls - Jon Bentley
Introduction To Algorithms - Cormen, Leiserson and Rivest
Unix Networking / Programming series - Richard Stevens

I found these books very helpful. They all more or less base themselves on C / C++ but can also be applied to other languages. The principles remain the same: write clever algorithms which are also fast. ;-)

WitchCraft
January 4th, 2009, 09:40 PM
Programming without programming language?

I think the mathematicians call this pseudo-algorithm, but that's basically the worst thing you can have...


If you use Linux/UNIX, you should start with Python.
If you use Windows, you should start with VisualBasic 6/.NET/Script
But you can also install Python on Windoze.


Then, if you have learned the game (and abstract programming concepts), you can move on to some more serious low-level stuff, like LISP, C/C++, or pure Assembly.

Also, perhaps more interesting stuff for learning is PHP and PosGres-SQL (Oracle)/MySQL.

For commercial demand, Perl might also be useful.

Interesting things also include cURL, SDL, OpenAL, wxWidgets and QT, with whom you can write cross-platform applications with just ONE code, without having to use the Java garbage.

For books, there are just two that I can recommend:
1. The UNIX networking books, as recommended above.
2. C Programmieren von A bis Z (C programming from A to Z)

the second however is written in German (and available free of charge online), but I don't know whether there exists an English translation.

So far that's all the books I can recommend, the rest is a pure waste of money.

jmartrican
January 4th, 2009, 10:42 PM
I like the following.

1) Head Start's Design Pattern book. If you are into OO this is a good book.
2) Code Complete 2. This is probably the third time I reccomended this book on this forum in the past two days. It covers basic tips, best practices, and solid advice for code construction. What it talks about pertains to all languages and it uses examples from various languages. We all learn theory and algorithms in school, but this is the stuff they do not teach you that experts with years of experience found out over the years. It will instill years of wisdom.

happysmileman
January 4th, 2009, 11:29 PM
1) Head Start's Design Pattern book. If you are into OO this is a good book.

Link?

jmartrican
January 4th, 2009, 11:55 PM
Woops it Head First, not head start.

http://www.amazon.com/First-Design-Patterns-Elisabeth-Freeman/dp/0596007124/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1231109658&sr=8-1

monkeyking
January 5th, 2009, 12:12 AM
It depends on your education level and/or your work experience.
Futhermore you'll be learning programming, not from books, but by alot of late nights trying debug a wrong placed semicolon or comma. :)

If you are a absolut greenhorne in programming, you should know that there are 2 fundamental different kind of languages.
functional and imperative.

Whatever book that covers a imperative language will do just fine.
And depends more on how you like to learn.
Some like long text, others learning by examples and so on.

Ive never really liked programming books,
but I liked java precisely which was just a very very concise guide for ppl who knew how to program.
http://www.itu.dk/~sestoft/javaprecisely/


Somesone might recommend the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_C_Programming_Language_(book) , or some book by stoustrup. These might have been good in the past, but I find them hopelessly outdated.


good luck

badperson
January 5th, 2009, 03:02 PM
sorry...

I meant more along the lines of the history of computer science, not programming it self.

It doesn't make you a better programmer, I just find it interesting.
bp

Cracauer
January 5th, 2009, 05:10 PM
sorry...

I meant more along the lines of the history of computer science, not programming it self.

It doesn't make you a better programmer, I just find it interesting.
bp

For this stuff, check out "Smalltalk-80: bits of history, words of advice".