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davidbilla
December 3rd, 2008, 05:58 PM
I've been wanting to start using an IDE apart from vim. I need support for C/C++, java and python. Less importantly, I'd also like support for perl, javascript, html, and php, but not necessarily. Any ideas?

Also, I've downloaded and installed Eclipse CDT from the website. Now, how do I go about installing eclipse ide for java and python? Do I have to open separate programs (like CDT, JDT, Python IDE etc.,) for development in different languages or can I just open one 'eclipse' and start developing in whatever language I want once I install support for the other languages? It's a little confusing. Do I have to download and install eclipse ide for each programming language separately?

hessiess
December 3rd, 2008, 06:07 PM
Just stick with Vim;)

davidbilla
December 3rd, 2008, 06:16 PM
Vim is very good, I agree. I've been using it for more than a year since I started using Linux. I just want to try out different things. To start with, it would be good if I could install some stable IDE that has C/C++, Java and Python support. Got any ideas?

namegame
December 3rd, 2008, 06:30 PM
I recommend Geany.

Idefix82
December 3rd, 2008, 06:36 PM
Personally, I really like Gedit. It has syntax highlighting for all the languages you need and lots of useful plugins, like a class browser, bracket matching, it's fully scriptable with python and bash and offers more goodies.

davidbilla
December 3rd, 2008, 06:37 PM
Yeah, just now installed it. Will try it out. About eclipse... I've installed CDT. What should I do if I want Java and Python support? There seem to be too many downloads. The Netbeans website seems to be clearer, it has a package called 'All' which supports all three languages I want. But eclipse has three or four versions for Java and I couldn't find Python IDE in a superficial search. There doesn't seem to be any straightforward links. Is it one of the 'projects' in eclipse? Will I have to open a seperate IDE window for each of the languages that I install eclipse IDE for?

gedit is good too, but somehow gvim seems to be a better option than gedit. You can choose one of the in-built themes that go pleasant on the eye and it too provides bracket matching. Any particular advantage of gedit over gvim?

Idefix82
December 3rd, 2008, 06:41 PM
I recommend Geany.

One question about Geany: how easy is it to add custom syntax highlighting, tooltips and code folding rules for a new language?

namegame
December 3rd, 2008, 06:50 PM
One question about Geany: how easy is it to add custom syntax highlighting, tooltips and code folding rules for a new language?

Honestly, I don't know as I've never had to add anything to it. Every language I used is covered. For me, Geany is the complete package.

It offers support for the following languages:

ASM
C
C#
C++
CAML
Conf
CSS
D
Diff
Docbook
F77
Ferite
Fortran
FreeBasic
GLSL
Haskell
Haxe
HTML
Java
Javascript
LaTeX
Lua
Make
None
O-Matrix
Pascal
Perl
PHP
Po
Python
R
reStructuredText
Ruby
Sh
SQL
Tcl
VHDL
XML

Idefix82
December 3rd, 2008, 07:02 PM
gedit is good too, but somehow gvim seems to be a better option than gedit. You can choose one of the in-built themes that go pleasant on the eye and it too provides bracket matching. Any particular advantage of gedit over gvim?

I haven't worked with gvim so can't compare.
One reason gedit perfectly fits my bill (except that it doesn't have code folding) is that I am working a lot with a number theory/algebra language called magma, which I can't expect to be provided for in any editor. So I created my own syntax highlighting rules, I set up macros using the external tools plugin, which start magma and load my file in it with one short cut key, macros which backup my entire working directory with one short cut key, I defined a theme myself, which perfectly fits my dark Ubuntu theme, so I now have an editor which perfectly caters for a language of which it had never heard before.

I also use Latex a lot and for that gedit has an amazing plugin.

If you are a web developer, then gedit offers many nice features like working via ftp or ssh directly on your web server, lots of useful plugins like browser preview, a tag list in the left side pane and so on. Have a look at this guide on how to turn gedit in a web developer's dream: http://www.micahcarrick.com/09-29-2007/gedit-html-editor.html

Sydius
December 3rd, 2008, 07:09 PM
I use gVim with a carefully-crafted .vimrc that includes a lot of macros for things like compiling if it's a C++ program or running it through lint if it is a PHP one. Combined with sshfs for working remotely, it does everything I need, and I like the clicky tabs (regular vim has tabs too, but I find it hard to use them without a mouse). I use code folding, auto-tabbing, bracket matching, etc.

tinny
December 3rd, 2008, 08:57 PM
Have a play with Netbeans (http://www.netbeans.org/) it supports Java, C/C++, Python, Groovy, PHP and Ruby out of the box.

Eclipse has a plugin for Python called Pydev http://pydev.sourceforge.net/

jimi_hendrix
December 3rd, 2008, 10:46 PM
gvim + terminal = your friend

indecisive
December 14th, 2008, 05:19 AM
Use Kate. It has EVERYTHING.

mssever
December 14th, 2008, 07:43 AM
I like the clicky tabs (regular vim has tabs too, but I find it hard to use them without a mouse).
Who says you can't use a mouse in regular vim?
:set mouse=aand click away.