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Thread: Mount: Must be superuser to mount.

  1. #21
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    Re: Mount: Must be superuser to mount.

    Perlluver: I have now entered both commands, but it didn't seem to work? Still getting the error.

  2. #22
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    Re: Mount: Must be superuser to mount.

    Quote Originally Posted by TheFly View Post
    Perlluver: I have now entered both commands, but it didn't seem to work? Still getting the error.
    Did you try what Xiong said, opening up gksudo nautilus and trying from there?

  3. #23
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    Re: Mount: Must be superuser to mount.

    Yes, then I get "Cannot mount volume. Invalid mount option when attempting to mount the volume 'My Book'"

  4. #24
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    Re: Mount: Must be superuser to mount.

    Quote Originally Posted by TheFly View Post
    Yes, then I get "Cannot mount volume. Invalid mount option when attempting to mount the volume 'My Book'"
    Ok instead of trying to open that, run gksudo nautilus and then just mount /dev/hdb1. It will mount it to another location.

  5. #25
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    Re: Mount: Must be superuser to mount.

    You mean I should first type gksudo nautilus (then the root folder appears) and then do a new command in the terminal with /dev/hdb1 ?

    hdb1 doesn't exist on my laptop, btw?

  6. #26
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    Re: Mount: Must be superuser to mount.

    However, "/dev/sdb1" is already mounted on /home it says, after running "mount /dev/sdb1" from root.

  7. #27
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    Re: Mount: Must be superuser to mount.

    Quote Originally Posted by perlluver View Post
    Also could you please post the output of
    Code:
    sudo fdisk -l
    so that we can make sure that the other hard drive is /dev/hdb1 and not named something else.
    Code:
    anders@anders-laptop:~$ sudo fdisk -l
    sudo: timestamp too far in the future: Sep 28 02:24:51 2008
    [sudo] password for anders: 
    
    Disk /dev/sda: 4034 MB, 4034838528 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 490 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x6eb0b942
    
       Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
    /dev/sda1   *           1         486     3903763+  83  Linux
    /dev/sda2             487         490       32130   82  Linux swap / Solaris
    
    Disk /dev/sdb: 8069 MB, 8069677056 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 981 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x000dc136
    
       Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
    /dev/sdb1               1         981     7879851   83  Linux
    
    Disk /dev/sdc: 320.0 GB, 320072933376 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 38913 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x44fdfe06
    
       Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
    /dev/sdc1               1       38913   312568641    c  W95 FAT32 (LBA)

  8. #28
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    Re: Mount: Must be superuser to mount.

    There are 2 main users on your system - root and you.
    Root owns your system. It allows you access to directories (folders) that ,if you change or delete them, will not harm your system.
    For some reason your my book is owned by root.
    You cannot mount it, or copy things on to it, or copy things from it, or delete things from it etc.
    Typing sudo and gksudo in the terminal and then entering your password gives you temporary root powers to manipulate these directories should you need to.
    You shouldn`t do this with most directories owned by root but some times stuff that you should own is owned by root, such as your My Book.

    Typing sudo mount is giving you the root powers to mount that drive.

    Typing sudo chown (change owner) is giving you the power to change who owns it - root can give it to you but you can`t take it from root.
    So (give me powers) sudo (change the owner) chown (to me) yourusername (of this directory)'/media/My Book'

    gksudo gives you root powers over guis (windows, as in pointy clicky things not microsoft)

    Nautilus is a file browser, when you click on places in your menus the window opens with nautilus. gksudo nautilus opens these files as root so that you can drag, drop and delete by pointing and clicking.
    When you have finished with nautilus as root you should close it straight away just in case you forget you are root and change something you shouldn`t by mistake.

    All this root business may seem like a pain at times but it`s why we don`t get viruses and it keeps you from messing up your system. Most people who totally waste their system do so by becoming root - I speak from experience.

    I`m sorry if I`m being too simplistic but a little understanding can help alot and this is absolute beginners.

  9. #29
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    Re: Mount: Must be superuser to mount.

    Quote Originally Posted by TheFly View Post
    Code:
    Disk /dev/sdc: 320.0 GB, 320072933376 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 38913 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x44fdfe06
    
       Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
    /dev/sdc1               1       38913   312568641    c  W95 FAT32 (LBA)
    Ok assuming your My Book is a 320gig external it`s /dev/sdc1
    Last edited by nothingspecial; September 27th, 2008 at 11:40 PM. Reason: attrocious spelling as usual

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    27

    Re: Mount: Must be superuser to mount.

    It seemed to be sdc1 yeah!
    Thanks a lot for the explaination! Now I things are a bit clearer.

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