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Thread: New to ubuntu and building

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
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    Milwaukee, WI
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    New to ubuntu and building

    Not exactly sure this is the correct forum but here I go.

    I am looking into building my next computer. I am completely new to it but I do know for sure that I will research everything I want to buy to make sure everything is compatible with Ubuntu and other hardware. My price range is about $1000. It can go up from there but I would like to keep it around there.

    I will be using it for majority of programming. I will use it for games but compared to internet usage and programming it is a small amount.

    I believe I have my mind set on quad core. I am still on the wall for 32bit vs. 64bit so I will need help there. I would like to have at least 1.5 GB of RAM but that is one of the few things that I know for sure can be upgraded later with ease (I have done it before). Everything is up for suggestions except ATI for a graphics card. Preferably I would like specific parts suggestions not general but if all you have is general it will be welcome. This will be my first build ever so all help is welcome. I know this community is very helpful because I have looked around the forum so I thank everyone in advance.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    OE
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    2,774
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    Ubuntu 12.04 Precise Pangolin

    Re: New to ubuntu and building

    When you say
    I am still on the wall for 32bit vs. 64bit so I will need help there.
    are you asking about the OS? I'm not sure there are any 32 bit hardware (processors) available anymore. As to which version (64 vs 32) to use, if that was the intent, there are plenty of threads on that topic.
    This
    Everything is up for suggestions except ATI for a graphics card.
    might cause you some problems although ATI is getting better with linux support-I think the majority opinion is that it's still not as well supported.
    Since you asked for specific hardware I would look at any of the barebones packages at places like tigerdirect, mwave & newegg. I tend to just buy individual items for my builds but sometimes the package price of the barebones systems are so good that it could work even if one item wasn't what you wanted-would be replaced. I'm sure there will be lots of different opinions though but those links give you a starting place. Also take a look at the ubuntu hardware database as well as the one at linuxquestions if you have doubts about any particular component.
    Alternate (psychocats.net) Ubuntu info resource

    Helping isn't what the logical mind thinks it is because when you help others you're really helping yourself.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Milwaukee, WI
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    Re: New to ubuntu and building

    I did mean the soft ware for the 32bit v 64bit question.

    As for the graphics card i meant I will not use ATI for the graphics card. I just forgot a few words in that sentence.

    Thank you for your advice on the bare bones packages. I will start to look into those shortly.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    United Kingdom
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    1,136
    Distro
    Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx

    Re: New to ubuntu and building

    1. If you think you will want to upgrade your memory to 4GB or better, then you should choose a 64bit OS, as 32 will only recognize up to about 3GB.

    2. Choose Nvidia graphics. Better in their build, and much friendlier with Linux.

    3. Choose your power supply and cooling (CPU fan, case fans etc.) wisely. Don't go cheap with these. You'll be glad in the long run.

    4. Check the specs on the Motherboard you choose carefully. Choose one that is as future proof as you can (at least five years of future compatibility). Both Gigabyte and Asus have a good reputation for this.

    5. Choose qualaity RAM (Crucial, etc.) don't skimp on this either.

    6. Don't automatically assume that Intel is better (they are getting much better press lately). Check out the AMD's benchmarks as well. They are generally less expensive and perform very well in most applications.


    Most everything else (sound, network, DVD drives,etc.) are really a matter of choice.

    It's the first five that are critical choices.

    Bob
    Last edited by bobnutfield; July 10th, 2008 at 10:50 PM.

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