Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: [SOLVED] multiple kernel entries in grub menu.1st

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Beans
    5

    [SOLVED] multiple kernel entries in grub menu.1st

    Hi

    When I used Update Manager to update ubuntu last month, it added a new kernel entry in my grub menu.1st file. When my wife started the computer the next day, grub did not boot and she picked the recovery partition for my Windows computer. It has taken a couple weeks to get Windows working again. I noticed that it did it again when I updated tonight.

    Is there any reason to keep older kernels in menu.1st? (for example, kernel 2.6.24-19-generic, kernel 2.6.24-18-generic, kernel 2.6.24-16-generic and kernel 2.6.24-14-generic)

    Kevin

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    City of Pines
    Beans
    3,585

    Re: multiple kernel entries in grub menu.1st

    Quote Originally Posted by kevind2071 View Post
    Hi

    When I used Update Manager to update ubuntu last month, it added a new kernel entry in my grub menu.1st file. When my wife started the computer the next day, grub did not boot and she picked the recovery partition for my Windows computer. It has taken a couple weeks to get Windows working again. I noticed that it did it again when I updated tonight.

    Is there any reason to keep older kernels in menu.1st? (for example, kernel 2.6.24-19-generic, kernel 2.6.24-18-generic, kernel 2.6.24-16-generic and kernel 2.6.24-14-generic)

    Kevin
    Placing the kernel entries in your menu.lst is the job of update-grub, this is performed everytime your kernel is updated to newer version.
    You can get rid (delete it/comment it out) of those old kernels in your GRUB menu by editing the /boot/grub/menu.lst file. Then later on, try to delete those old kernels using your Synaptics Package Manager. Search for the string "linux-image" (w/o quote) and delete the old kernels that displays.

    Code:
    gksu gedit /boot/grub/menu.lst
    Steady movement is more important than speed, much of the time. So long as there is a regular progression of Stimuli to get your mental hooks into, there is room for lateral movement. Once this begins, its rate is a matter of discretion.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Beans
    5

    Re: multiple kernel entries in grub menu.1st

    I figured that I could comment out the grub entries and/or change the default number manually, but that seems to be a hassle every time the kernel changes.

    If later, I decide to use Synaptics to remove the kernels, will grub-update delete the entries in menu.1st.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    City of Pines
    Beans
    3,585

    Re: multiple kernel entries in grub menu.1st

    Quote Originally Posted by kevind2071 View Post
    I figured that I could comment out the grub entries and/or change the default number manually, but that seems to be a hassle every time the kernel changes.

    If later, I decide to use Synaptics to remove the kernels, will grub-update delete the entries in menu.1st.
    Yes, that automatically would make changes in your /boot/grub/menu.lst file.
    Steady movement is more important than speed, much of the time. So long as there is a regular progression of Stimuli to get your mental hooks into, there is room for lateral movement. Once this begins, its rate is a matter of discretion.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Beans
    5

    Re: multiple kernel entries in grub menu.1st

    Quote Originally Posted by iaculallad View Post
    Yes, that automatically would make changes in your /boot/grub/menu.lst file.
    Is there any reason to keep older kernels around? I understand keeping one or two around for testing purposes. What is a good rule of thumb?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    City of Pines
    Beans
    3,585

    Re: multiple kernel entries in grub menu.1st

    Quote Originally Posted by kevind2071 View Post
    Is there any reason to keep older kernels around? I understand keeping one or two around for testing purposes. What is a good rule of thumb?
    Good rule of thumb is to keep a kernel (old kernel) that has not caused your system to break or displayed any major error. You're new kernel upgrade would just be for experimentation.

    If that "new" kernel had not caused any breakdown, then maybe, it's time for that OLD kernel to be deleted.
    Steady movement is more important than speed, much of the time. So long as there is a regular progression of Stimuli to get your mental hooks into, there is room for lateral movement. Once this begins, its rate is a matter of discretion.

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •