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Thread: Replace Nautilus

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Beans
    2,577
    Distro
    Ubuntu

    Re: Replace Nautilus

    If what you want is "mirroring", i.e. make destination directory tree identical to source directory tree, then the command line is really simple. You need the option -a and the option --delete if you want to delete files in the destination that do not anymore exist in the source. For example:

    rsync -a --del /home/user/source/ /home/user/backup/

    Setting this up for the first time, you might prefer to omit the --del to see if the copy goes into the right destination. The --del option could be very dangerous if you mistakenly swap source and destination.

    That said (we are somewhat off-topic) I do like nautilus for daily copying work nevertheless.

    In fact, when copying a directory over, nautilus asks first if you want to "merge" or "merge all" (i.e. copy into the destination directories) and then asks whether to replace or not already existing files. Using the "skip all" option, it will only transfer files and directories that do not yet exist in the destination. I tested on a quite large volume of data, and because both prompt comes early in the copying process, I do not see the issue.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Barcelona
    Beans
    254
    Distro
    Ubuntu 12.04 Precise Pangolin

    Re: Replace Nautilus

    Quote Originally Posted by vanadium View Post
    In fact, when copying a directory over, nautilus asks first if you want to "merge" or "merge all" (i.e. copy into the destination directories) and then asks whether to replace or not already existing files. Using the "skip all" option, it will only transfer files and directories that do not yet exist in the destination. I tested on a quite large volume of data, and because both prompt comes early in the copying process, I do not see the issue.
    holy cow do I feel dumb!

    Though I'm happy to learn that nautilus DOES do what I want, i wonder if other people are also confused by nautilus's form of asking the question? I was thinking that the "skip all" option was aking me to abort the whole procedure, it never occured to me that it would still copy the files that were different!!

    what probably threw me off, is that there are two consecutive dialogues which open with five options each:

    <cancel> <skip all> <merge all> <skip> <merge>

    (and upon choosing <merge all>)

    <cancel> <skip all> <replace all> <skip> <replace>

    in which the first <skip all> basically means "cancel the op", the second <skip all> basically means "allow the op" - to merge without overwriting.

    I wonder if this couldn't be rethought. It seems to be based on a model which allows you to decide about each and every directory and file before overwrite, a model which strikes me as something I might have wanted to do in the early 1990's, but rarely anymore, there are just too many files to think about each one.

    perhaps the best thing would be a couple of checkboxes below the options which would ask:
    ( ) ask me about each directory
    ( ) ask me about each file & subdirectory

    which would reduce it to a single dialogue asking:

    <cancel> <skip> <merge> <overwrite>

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Beans
    25
    Distro
    Ubuntu 7.10 Gutsy Gibbon

    Re: Replace Nautilus

    Unison is also pretty useful and it allows you to go back and forth between the two replicas. So you can archive to a flash drive, for example, then modify those files on another computer and then bring back the flash drive and reconciles changes with the source.

    Code:
    unison /home/user/source/ /home/user/archive/
    There's also a GUI: unison-gtk

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