Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 29 of 29

Thread: Math Type for Linux?

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Bergen, Norway
    Beans
    14
    Distro
    Xubuntu 8.10 Intrepid Ibex

    Re: Math Type for Linux? Try firefox with applet DragMath

    I am sorry, this is a third entry today. I remembered one more
    nice software piece:

    See the downloadable applet DragMath
    http://www.dragmath.bham.ac.uk/
    where you get MathType functionality inside any web browser with java.
    As DragMath is open-source, you are free to download and re-distribute.
    DragMath requires Java 1.4.2 or later

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    ISS
    Beans
    1,429

    Re: Math Type for Linux? Reply to Vivaldi Gloria in #10

    I don't want to hijack this thread but with apologies to OP I have to answer lad.kocb.

    When D. Knuth started TEX, there even was not much GUI around.
    And practice has shown that LaTeX is still better than all gui editors.

    You are right, the simple math can easily be entered straight into the text, but try entering a continuous fraction with terms containing fractions and braces etc.
    Are you kiddin me? Of course it is easier with LaTeX.

    Pal, you need to read more about logical vs. visual design. Visual design may be OK for a short paper. But it is no good for complex documents.

    You should read sections 1.4-1.5 in Lamport's book - LaTeX, A Document Preparation system. There he compares the two approaches and gives an example (about the inner product) which shows it's much efficient to use LaTeX.

    Suppose I wrote a paper in LaTeX and sent it to the journal A using their style file. Now A rejected the paper and I want to send it to the journal B. But B uses a completely different syle & layout. What am I to do? Simple, I download their style file and use it. I don't have to change anything in the document. The whole document gets typeset automatically to the new style!!

    And that is the main point of LaTeX - you don't bother with the page format and appearance of the document which makes you loose time, makes the document rigid, and afterall humans are not very good at it. LaTeX takes care of all visual design of the document so you just type the content, and believe me, typing is much faster than typing plus visual design. Get a complex document with a lot of formulas and have it typed by two people - a Word wizard and a LaTeX wizard. The LaTeX guy will write it in a fraction of the time it takes the word guy to write it.

    How many times did you strugle with word when it puts an item in an odd place, or it starts numbering things which are not supposed to be numbered, and so on. I go mad even if I try to write a two page document with word. Writing a 100 page scientific document with word? - Better kill me so the pain & suffering ends.

    And I stress the fact that humans (and Word) are not good at designing complex documents. The primary strength of LaTeX is its typesetting quality. I can always tell which hw is written using LaTeX and which is not. The ones written with LaTeX look great and the others look like sh*t.

    Also read:

    http://nitens.org/taraborelli/latex

    http://www.ecn.wfu.edu/~cottrell/wp.html

    http://www.andy-roberts.net/misc/latex/latexvsword.html

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Bergen, Norway
    Beans
    14
    Distro
    Xubuntu 8.10 Intrepid Ibex

    Re: Math Type for Linux? Answer to Vivaldi Gloria (part II)

    Neither I want to monopolize this thread, but the last entry
    by Vivaldi Gloria calls for a little comment. Yes, I completely
    agree with you! Except of your language in the last sentence
    I could have written exactly what you have written.
    I was not talking about Word or any other word processor.
    I was talking exclusively about TeX/LaTeX.
    Even the "Scientific Word" is latex based, it has nothing to do
    with "the other" Word from Redmond.

    I was simply saying that when you are going to design a
    complicated structure in TEX, it might be helpful to use
    a graphical tool. I also said that I have been using latex for
    nearly 20 years (and I hope to do it for the rest of my
    scientific carrier - which unfortunately is much less
    than 20 years).

    I have no doubts that latex is THE best way now available
    (and in foreseeable future) to work with mathematical texts.
    All computer algebra systems I know about export latex, preprint
    archives are based on latex, most physics journals I know accept
    latex submissions, etc. Just to finish, I am afraid that the
    younger generation is getting sometimes too microsoftized, as
    well as some "less theoretical" fields of science, who are
    unfortunately falling deeper and deeper in Microsoft web of
    tricks and lies.

    So dear Vivaldi Gloria, continue your fight! Good luck! But
    please, do not waste your ammunition on me. I am on your side.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    ISS
    Beans
    1,429

    Re: Math Type for Linux?

    I am not fighting or carrying around "ammunition" but I guess I got carried away there a bit. Well, nice that we agree. Sorry if I sounded harsh.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Beans
    7

    Re: Math Type for Linux?

    I agree with lad.kocb. Latex is nice in formatting maths, not typing maths. A few examples shows that: a fraction takes "\frac{}{}" 9 key strokes to complete in latex, but just "^C F" 3 key strokes to complete in Mathtype. A large bracelet takes "\left( \right)" 13 key strokes to complete in latex, but "^C (" 3 key strokes to complete in Mathtype. Typing a matrix reads as "\begin{array}...\end{array}" in latex. And "^M 3" gives you a 3x3 matrix in mathtype.
    Therefore, if you work as a teaching assistant and have tons of equations to type for the class everyday, type all latex code by hand is definitely going to kill you.

    Now, speaking of workaround. At first I thought there is a workaround in latex: define Macros. But after defining macros on macros on macros, the readability of latex code degrades a lot. Especially when you are working with some one else(coauthor a paper, working with an instructor), don't expect everyone to understand your macros.

    For the questions in this thread, I would recommend to install vmware , run mathtype on it, and connect to it via rdesktop. It's far more reliable than wine. You don't have any of the fonts isuses.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Mexico DF
    Beans
    35
    Distro
    Ubuntu 8.04 Hardy Heron

    Re: Math Type for Linux?

    You can use texmacs http://texmacs.org
    Simple and proffessional

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    ISS
    Beans
    1,429

    Re: Math Type for Linux?

    Quote Originally Posted by hx129 View Post
    I agree with lad.kocb. Latex is nice in formatting maths, not typing maths. A few examples shows that: a fraction takes "\frac{}{}" 9 key strokes to complete in latex, but just "^C F" 3 key strokes to complete in Mathtype. A large bracelet takes "\left( \right)" 13 key strokes to complete in latex, but "^C (" 3 key strokes to complete in Mathtype. Typing a matrix reads as "\begin{array}...\end{array}" in latex. And "^M 3" gives you a 3x3 matrix in mathtype.
    Therefore, if you work as a teaching assistant and have tons of equations to type for the class everyday, type all latex code by hand is definitely going to kill you.
    Good. You go in to matrix mode 2 seconds faster in mathtype. But you'll loose that 2 seconds when you are actually making that matrix. Do we have to go over this again? Take any technical book and have it written by a latex guru and mathtype guru. Latex guru will finish it much faster.

    What part of this do you not understand? People can type much faster than they compose formulas by hand!

    Let me repeat it for you:

    People can type much faster than they compose formulas by hand!

    You don't know what you are talking about.

    Latex is THE choice for technical documents all around the world for a reason. The first of them being that it's a lot faster. This is not the only reason. Read my above post to grasp some of the other reasons.

    Quote Originally Posted by hx129 View Post
    Now, speaking of workaround. At first I thought there is a workaround in latex: define Macros. But after defining macros on macros on macros, the readability of latex code degrades a lot. Especially when you are working with some one else(coauthor a paper, working with an instructor), don't expect everyone to understand your macros.
    There is no need for a workaround because latex is FASTER! Gee.

    If you want to use macros in latex then use descriptive names and you'll remember them. Also put them in a separate file if there are a lot of them, else put them in the preamble.

    Quote Originally Posted by hx129 View Post
    For the questions in this thread, I would recommend to install vmware , run mathtype on it, and connect to it via rdesktop. It's far more reliable than wine. You don't have any of the fonts isuses.
    Yes, the OP has a valid reason not to use latex, so this may be a valid suggestion. But I suggest wine if mathtype works with it. Wine is close to native, requires less resources, it's foss, and you don't need to buy windows to use programs with it.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Beans
    24

    Re: Math Type for Linux?

    Anyone know if there is mathtype like math editor for linux that allows to handwrite equations with mouse and convert those into images or text?

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Porirua, New Zealand
    Beans
    Hidden!
    Distro
    Ubuntu

    Re: Math Type for Linux?

    Quote Originally Posted by tehwizardd View Post
    Anyone know if there is mathtype like math editor for linux that allows to handwrite equations with mouse and convert those into images or text?
    A lot can change in four years.

    From the forum code of conduct:
    If a post is older than a year or so and hasn't had a new reply in that time, instead of replying to it, create a new thread. In the software world, a lot can change in a very short time, and doing things this way makes it more likely that you will find the best information. You may link to the original discussion in the new thread if you think it may be helpful.
    Forum DOs and DON'Ts
    Never assume that information you find using a search engine is up-to-date.

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •