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Thread: NEW UBUNTU USERS: Becoming friends with the terminal...

  1. #21
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    Re: NEW UBUNTU USERS: Becoming friends with the terminal...

    One handy little item I have just found is, in the Terminal with the cursor active I can browse previous commands. I can look for command I have forgotten and check for keyed errors. Just by using the up or the down arrow .

  2. #22
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    Re: NEW UBUNTU USERS: Becoming friends with the terminal...

    Quote Originally Posted by roshm View Post
    One handy little item I have just found is, in the Terminal with the cursor active I can browse previous commands. I can look for command I have forgotten and check for keyed errors. Just by using the up or the down arrow .
    Another tip: Try pressing ctrl-r, then try typing part of a previous command. The first closest matching command containing what you've type will be displayed. Press esc to cancel the search and resume normal editing of the command, or enter to accept and execute it directly without further editing. That's an even quicker way to get back to a previous command.
    "Python, the language that wraps itself around a problem to squeeze out a solution, swallowing it whole."
    Linux user number #14284
    "A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step." - Confucius.

  3. #23
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    Re: NEW UBUNTU USERS: Becoming friends with the terminal...

    Quote Originally Posted by Mazza558 View Post
    The best way to describe this nasty command is the 10-character code of death.
    but still true

  4. #24
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    Re: NEW UBUNTU USERS: Becoming friends with the terminal...

    12 thanks from 1 guide... I'm flattered
    Laptop: Inspiron 1501 - AMD64 (Dual Core), 1GB RAM, 120 GB HDD, ATI 1150. Ubuntu 9.04 Jaunty testing.
    Beginner's Guide to the Terminal! | FutureLooks 3 on GNOME-Look | Follow me on Twitter!

  5. #25
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    Re: NEW UBUNTU USERS: Becoming friends with the terminal...

    pretty useful guide for newbie
    good effort
    sudo apt-get desires-of-life
    Life would be so beautiful if desires were found in repository.

  6. #26
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    Re: NEW UBUNTU USERS: Becoming friends with the terminal...

    Luckily for you, if you enter this code accidentally, it will give you one last safeguard - SUDO. Remember, in this case, SUDO is a guardian. It'll ask for your permission. Make sure that if you see this code, do NOT give your password. SUDO is one of the greatest security features ever added to an OS, but it cannot protect you from your own mistakes.
    One note of concern: If a reader has already tested their sudo powers on "sudo apt-get update", they will probably get to the rogue command and may even type it within the 15-minute sudo grace period.
    Acer Aspire 5050-5554 w/ 4GB RAM upgrade. Ubuntu Aug 07 - Dec 08; Arch Linux Dec 08 - July 2011; Ubuntu again since July 2011.
    "Triclops": Home-built AMD Athlon II X2 250, 4GB RAM, Radeon 6570, 500GB HDD. Ubuntu/Windows-XP duo since Jun 2010.

  7. #27
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    Re: NEW UBUNTU USERS: Becoming friends with the terminal...

    Quote Originally Posted by aaaantoine View Post
    One note of concern: If a reader has already tested their sudo powers on "sudo apt-get update", they will probably get to the rogue command and may even type it within the 15-minute sudo grace period.
    Good point. I've added it to the original post.
    Laptop: Inspiron 1501 - AMD64 (Dual Core), 1GB RAM, 120 GB HDD, ATI 1150. Ubuntu 9.04 Jaunty testing.
    Beginner's Guide to the Terminal! | FutureLooks 3 on GNOME-Look | Follow me on Twitter!

  8. #28
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    Re: NEW UBUNTU USERS: Becoming friends with the terminal...

    Just a minor update, I've elaborated a bit on what

    Code:
    sudo apt-get update
    does, and clarified a few other things in the guide.
    Laptop: Inspiron 1501 - AMD64 (Dual Core), 1GB RAM, 120 GB HDD, ATI 1150. Ubuntu 9.04 Jaunty testing.
    Beginner's Guide to the Terminal! | FutureLooks 3 on GNOME-Look | Follow me on Twitter!

  9. #29
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    Re: NEW UBUNTU USERS: Becoming friends with the terminal...

    Very useful, I have just started using ubuntu and have managed to use the terminal by blindly cutting and pasting from guides, but that was really useful in terms of actually starting to have some tiny understanding of what things do.

  10. #30
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    Re: NEW UBUNTU USERS: Becoming friends with the terminal...

    Nice work. I know that someone already mentioned using man, but can I suggest you add this to the original post. After you have said:

    Okay, here's a breakdown of what this command will do to your PC:

    SUDO: Gives the code the permission to do anything to your PC, but remember, only with your permission first.

    RM: ReMove a file or multiple files (Can you guess where this is going?)

    -R Recursive - this option will remove any subfolders as well. For example, if you did RM -R /home/bob, then any folders contained within "bob" would be deleted too.

    F (part of -RF) - Force. This means that despite any protests by the system, this command has absolute power. It WILL be run, no matter what. It will not ask for any confirmation at all either.

    / By far the most dangerous bit of the command.
    ... I think you should add that running

    Code:
    man rm
    will give you all this info and more.
    Perhaps you could reiterate that users should check the man page for each command they are copying from a post:
    - don't try to understand it all, but run an eye over the page to see if you can get the gist of what the command in the post is supposed to do. Be on the lookout for commands that are malicious - this is unusual to find in the forums as most people are there to help, but it pays to be cautious.

    It might be worth mentioning that the man page can be scrolled with the cursor keys or the mouse wheel. Pressing q will Quit from the manual page.
    Last edited by Daveski; March 16th, 2008 at 01:46 AM.
    I used to have a handle on life, but it snapped off.
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