Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 38

Thread: Beginners Guide to GnuPG

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Beans
    7,554
    Distro
    Ubuntu 12.04 Precise Pangolin

    Re: Beginners Guide to GnuPG

    So you want to see the contents of the public and private keys for example.

    The keys are actually in binary format, but you can export the keys in equivalent ascii format to see the difference.

    Remember, every key on a keyring there is at least one signing and one encryption key. The signing key is the primary key, the encryption key is the subkey.

    The private keys are kept on the secret keyring and the public keys are kept on the public key ring.

    So lets see if any of the keys differ. Here is what you gave me:

    Public KeyRing
    pub 1024D/069C39A4 2008-01-28
    uid John Smith <johnsmith@hismail.com>
    sub 2048g/045D39H5 2008-01-28

    Private Keyring
    sec 1024D/069C39A4 2008-01-28
    uid John Smith <johnsmith@hismail.com>
    ssb 2048g/045D39H5 2008-01-28

    The public signing key is designated by pub 1024D/069C39A4. The corresponding private signing key is sec 1024D/06C39A4.

    The public encryption key is designated by sub 2048g/045D39H5. The corresponding private encryption key is ssb 2048g/045D39H5.

    So lets just see if any of these keys differ. Im going to compare the signing keys (you could do the same for the encryption keys if you want)

    gpg --armor --export 069C39A4 > public_signing_key
    gpg --armor --export-secret-keys 069C39A4 > private_signing_key

    You can compare the two files by doing the following
    diff -q public_signing_key private_signing_key
    diff -y public_signing_key private_signing_key | more

    The first gives you a global summary, the second command will list the files line by line - side by side - so you can compare them yourselves. You can see the differ. So that is proof. You can confirm this with your encryption key sets also, or even compare the public encryption key with the public signing key to prove to yourself the keys differ.

    Convinced yet?

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Beans
    16
    Distro
    Xubuntu 7.04 Feisty Fawn

    Re: Beginners Guide to GnuPG

    Quote Originally Posted by kevdog View Post
    Convinced yet?
    Well, all I can say is I've saved this page and keep it in a safe place so that I won't lose it!

    Excellent explanation. Thanks!

    Arhuma

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    40.31996,-80.607213
    Beans
    Hidden!
    Distro
    Ubuntu

    Re: Beginners Guide to GnuPG

    I must say, beautiful explanation!
    (Sorry I can't say more, but I'm learning Dvorak and typing is still slow.)
    "Security lies within the user of who runs the system. Think smart, live safe." - Dr Small
    Linux User #441960 | Wiki: DrSmall

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Beans
    7,554
    Distro
    Ubuntu 12.04 Precise Pangolin

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    40.31996,-80.607213
    Beans
    Hidden!
    Distro
    Ubuntu

    Re: Beginners Guide to GnuPG

    Quote Originally Posted by kevdog View Post
    Off-topic
    What's Dvorak?
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dvorak_Simplified_Keyboard
    "Security lies within the user of who runs the system. Think smart, live safe." - Dr Small
    Linux User #441960 | Wiki: DrSmall

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Beans
    7,554
    Distro
    Ubuntu 12.04 Precise Pangolin

    Re: Beginners Guide to GnuPG

    Thanks for the link. I think learning DVORAK would be really hard. Its would be extremely hard for me to retrain my brain to think like that. I probably dont type more than 60-70 wpm, however I do so without even thinking about letter placement. Give me a new letter placement, Im not sure if I could overcome. Im not very good with learning languages either, so perhaps it uses the same skill set. Tell me if the experiment works.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    USA
    Beans
    12
    Distro
    Ubuntu 7.10 Gutsy Gibbon

    Re: Beginners Guide to GnuPG

    Looks like a nice guide.

    Problems I am encountering:
    1) There is a difference when running seahorse or GPA from sudo (root) and as listed in this tutorial (not as root).
    2) When running per this tutorial seahorse is broken and so is GPA
    3) When running from root ie. sudo seahorse it appears to work but doesn't.

    What I am able to do is copy over my keys from another machine (using a USB stick) into the sudo seahorse... however running gedit or sudo gedit does not permit encrypting of the text contents.

    I get the following error:
    Couldn't connect to seahorse-daemon

    Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
    I appreciate all help.

    -Steve

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Alexandria
    Beans
    1,202
    Distro
    Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic Koala

    Re: Beginners Guide to GnuPG

    impressive
    Linux user #434738 - Ubuntu user #9391
    Be happy .....think of others and thank GOD.

    Kindly mark your thread [SOLVED] if it is done.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Beans
    1

    Re: Beginners Guide to GnuPG

    Thanks for the tutorial, it's very nice.

    I have one question, what happens with your keys if someone who has physicall access to your pc, resets your password and accesses your user account? I know that XP will destroy your keys in such situation, and attacker won't be able to decrypt your files (EFS), but i'm new to linux, what happens here? And, what would happen with, say, email client (Evolution), would attacker be able to read encrypted emails, and maybe even use the key to encrypt/sign messages that he sends?

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    40.31996,-80.607213
    Beans
    Hidden!
    Distro
    Ubuntu

    Re: Beginners Guide to GnuPG

    Quote Originally Posted by miloske85 View Post
    Thanks for the tutorial, it's very nice.

    I have one question, what happens with your keys if someone who has physicall access to your pc, resets your password and accesses your user account? I know that XP will destroy your keys in such situation, and attacker won't be able to decrypt your files (EFS), but i'm new to linux, what happens here? And, what would happen with, say, email client (Evolution), would attacker be able to read encrypted emails, and maybe even use the key to encrypt/sign messages that he sends?
    To decrypt, clearsign or change the password on the key, the person who has physical access to the system with your private key would have to enter the password of your private key to unlock it.

    Therefore, he would not be able to decrypt, clearsign or reset your password. All should be safe. Of course, unless you have a weak passphrase on your private key.

    Dr Small
    "Security lies within the user of who runs the system. Think smart, live safe." - Dr Small
    Linux User #441960 | Wiki: DrSmall

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •