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Thread: What is up with Slackware

  1. #1
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    What is up with Slackware

    What is up with the Slackware distro? I have looked at their page as I venture through different Linux distros, and there is about NOTHING that interests me in Slackware. That is why I'm posting. What are the cons of Slackware??? Their web site is very sorry, I have looked at it every now and then since version 10 (a friend recommended me to give it a try way back when). I have looked for documentation or screen shots, or advantages, and maybe I'm missing it, but it seems like a distro that is phasing out, or something. Don't flame me, just inform me.

    Shane

  2. #2
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    Re: What is up with Slackware

    Sackware is all about "Do It Yourself". Some people like it because they want absolute control about everything on their systems, without any automated script interfering. It's also an excellent way to learn more about Linux. As the old saying goes, "When you know RedHat, you know RedHat. When you know Slackware, you know Linux." Even Pat - the guy behind it - does it this way, all by himself.
    Last edited by Bachstelze; November 7th, 2007 at 03:05 AM.
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  3. #3
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    Re: What is up with Slackware

    Its about the oldest distro around, and I like it. Its *very* no-frills (as you can see by the website), but its a very solid and stable linux distro with a pretty good following. I ran it for quite a while with very good luck. The only reason I left is for apt-get. Slackware doesn't have a dependency checking package manager nearly as powerful as apt (slapt-get and swaret aren't there yet), so I spent an awful lot of time looking around the internet for dependencies when I was installing something new. That is the *only* con I can think of. On the plus side, for me it ran quite a bit faster than ubuntu, with fewer weird little problems. As long as I was careful about who's packages I installed, everything ran extremely smooth. I kind of miss it actually.
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  4. #4
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    Re: What is up with Slackware

    Sorry, I meant I wanted to know the pro's I typed wrong. but I guess you got the idea. Thanks for the info. I'm still not overly sold on it.

    Shane

  5. #5
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    Re: What is up with Slackware

    Slackware is a great distro and is the only one I use now. It's not as difficult as most people perceive, but doing your own dependency checking and installing can take you to the brink of madness sometimes. Slackware 12 gives you a fully functioning system out of the box, but after that it's up to you.

    I recommend slack to anyone who wants to learn the nuts and bolts of Linux. I'm going to school in a computer-related field (GIS) and wanted some Linux experience before I graduate. Now Slackware has replaced Windows on my home machine entirely.

    It is the oldest distro still in general use and is also the most unix-like. It is maintained by one man (Pat Volkerding) who insures that slackware remains stable and true to its roots. The packages are updated through slackware-current and it does not feel 'old' at all. Pat's got a very loyal following and once you try slack for a while, it really grows on you fast.

    As for the website, it's just like slackware itself. Gets the job done without all the glitz.

    Dig

  6. #6
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    Re: What is up with Slackware

    So i felt like procrastinating, probably a little too much, and installed Slackware 12.0 on my thinkpad T43. Woooah. I mean, wooooooooaaaaaaaaah. It took a little more fanagaling to setup, but it *flies*. I thought ubuntu was fast, i was wrong. I havn't even tweaked the thing yet and its quite a bit quicker. I think theres more "stuff" loaded by default in ubuntu.

    Anyway...
    100 buckets of bits on the bus,
    100 buckets of bits,
    Take one down, short it to ground,
    FF buckets of bits on the bus.

  7. #7
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    Re: What is up with Slackware

    Slackware is a horrible second (or third, or fourth, or...) Linux distro to run. It is, however, an excellent first Linux Distro.

    Running Slackware after having learned on something such as Mandrake or Ubuntu is a lot like learning how to drive a stick-shift after learning how to drive using an automatic. You can do it, but damn is it a pain in the ***.

    Long story short; Slackware is a great OS to learn Linux (the CLI aspect, none of this 'gnome' 'synaptic' blah blah blah stuff) from, it's a great minimalist DIY OS, but if you don't even know what a CLI is -stay away, stick to Ubuntu.

  8. #8
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    Re: What is up with Slackware

    Quote Originally Posted by Whiffle View Post
    So i felt like procrastinating, probably a little too much, and installed Slackware 12.0 on my thinkpad T43. Woooah. I mean, wooooooooaaaaaaaaah. It took a little more fanagaling to setup, but it *flies*. I thought ubuntu was fast, i was wrong. I havn't even tweaked the thing yet and its quite a bit quicker. I think theres more "stuff" loaded by default in ubuntu.

    Anyway...
    Now that is a sales pitch! That makes me want to give Slackware a try.

    Quote Originally Posted by rliegh View Post
    Slackware is a horrible second (or third, or fourth, or...) Linux distro to run. It is, however, an excellent first Linux Distro.

    Running Slackware after having learned on something such as Mandrake or Ubuntu is a lot like learning how to drive a stick-shift after learning how to drive using an automatic. You can do it, but damn is it a pain in the ***.

    Long story short; Slackware is a great OS to learn Linux (the CLI aspect, none of this 'gnome' 'synaptic' blah blah blah stuff) from, it's a great minimalist DIY OS, but if you don't even know what a CLI is -stay away, stick to Ubuntu.

    CLI, isn't a problem for me. I have Gentoo installed (by the way their web site, and info looks way more inviting then Slackwares).

    Shane

  9. #9
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    Re: What is up with Slackware

    I started my linux journey with ubuntu, then I tried debian. I never thought I would ever switch from debian based distros, since I really like the APT package manager. Then I tried zenwalk (based on slackware). Zenwalk is now my main OS. Zenwalk got me interested in slackware, so I installed slack 12 on my laptop. Slackware is now my main OS on the laptop. I have come to really like the slack way of doing things. Yes, there is no dependency management, and you manage them yourself. It is easy to compile things on slack, and the distro seems very hard to break. Slackware comes with a lot of stuff out of the box. I installed everything from the first 2 CDs, and I got all of KDE and XFCE, so you are pretty much good to go right there.
    You can get great slack build scripts here:
    http://slackbuilds.org/
    http://www.slackware.com/~alien/slackbuilds/
    and binary slack packages:
    http://linuxpackages.net/
    http://slacky.eu/
    Slackware config files are VERY well commented, and tell you exactly how to edit them right there in the file. I wish all distros were like that. That is what people mean when they say slackware is "simple".
    Read the slack book to get started:
    http://www.slackbook.org/http://www.slackbook.org
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  10. #10
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    Re: What is up with Slackware

    Quote Originally Posted by tommcd View Post
    I started my linux journey with ubuntu, then I tried debian. I never thought I would ever switch from debian based distros, since I really like the APT package manager. Then I tried zenwalk (based on slackware). Zenwalk is now my main OS. Zenwalk got me interested in slackware, so I installed slack 12 on my laptop. Slackware is now my main OS on the laptop. I have come to really like the slack way of doing things. Yes, there is no dependency management, and you manage them yourself. It is easy to compile things on slack, and the distro seems very hard to break. Slackware comes with a lot of stuff out of the box. I installed everything from the first 2 CDs, and I got all of KDE and XFCE, so you are pretty much good to go right there.
    You can get great slack build scripts here:
    http://slackbuilds.org/
    http://www.slackware.com/~alien/slackbuilds/
    and binary slack packages:
    http://linuxpackages.net/
    http://slacky.eu/
    Slackware config files are VERY well commented, and tell you exactly how to edit them right there in the file. I wish all distros were like that. That is what people mean when they say slackware is "simple".
    Read the slack book to get started:
    http://www.slackbook.org/http://www.slackbook.org
    Tell me, what made you stop at Slackware? What were the points of Slackware that you liked better than debian? I'm wondering if I will have time to track down the dependencies, or even the desire, I mean with distros out there that just work, and even Gentoo that gives me the dependencies (most of the time) what would the advantages of Slack be? I do enjoy learning, and think I would enjoy diving into Slackware from that stand point. Can it teach me more than Gentoo? Thanks for the info.

    Shane

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