View Poll Results: What does "ready for the desktop" mean to you?

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  • Any person can install it on any computer without any problems

    1,609 34.95%
  • Anyone can use it once it's already been installed and configured

    2,414 52.43%
  • Every commercial application works on it

    453 9.84%
  • Nothing--it's a nonsensical term

    704 15.29%
  • It automatically detects most hardware without the need to hunt down drivers

    2,236 48.57%
  • It comes preinstalled on computers so novice users don't have to install it

    889 19.31%
  • It's suitable to the needs of most beginner users but not necessarily to most intermediate ones

    568 12.34%
  • Windows and nothing else... not even Mac OS X

    46 1.00%
  • Works on my desktop

    1,199 26.04%
  • Other (please explain)

    166 3.61%
Multiple Choice Poll.
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Thread: Linux Desktop Readiness Thread

  1. #111
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Planet NoVA
    Beans
    2,091
    Distro
    Ubuntu 11.04 Natty Narwhal

    Re: How to make ubuntu easier to use for people with little computer knowledge

    Quote Originally Posted by poofyhairguy
    Every single poster that has come here just to bitch about Ubuntu not having things on the default (mp3 support or whatever) is one of those people that only wants the computer to be a tool. To them I say, either suck it up or enjoy your Xandros....

    ...

    Ubuntu shouldn't cater to these people, except maybe when planning out security protocols. Now, if some business people want to step in an act like Dell and sell set up Ubuntu PCs, more power to him/her. But don't ruin Ubuntu for those that like to tinker.
    Ahh, and nerd-supremacy rears its ugly head yet again. Looks like I'll be looking for another distro, soon.

    Seriously. I have come to like ubuntu more than other distributions because of the conspicuous LACK of this sort of newbie-hating. "Humanity to others," wasn't it? Oh, unless those 'others' don't happen to enjoy tinkering with their machine too much.

  2. #112
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    USA
    Beans
    3,774

    Thumbs down Re: How to make ubuntu easier to use for people with little computer knowledge

    I think any, Operating System can be made to better suit a user, but what user would that be? Lets face it there are not just two, three or even four types of computer user. Everyone has their own opinion as to what is BETTER and what SHOULD be done.

    I so wish this thread would have prompted a hey thats a good idea lets create some sort of "Welcome to Ubuntu linux" program that is ran when first logging into the system..

    Thread locked.. I see no purpose in a 10 page bash fest of whats better and worse, whats better for me and not you type of thread..
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  3. #113
    primeirocrime Guest

    Re: ubuntu ready for end-users?

    I think ubuntu is ready for end-users:

    Got a live cd inside this winXP spyweared machine, boot up, and got my friend to use everything in his computer. Detected everything. All the apps were there for her to use. The only thing she complained about was GAIM not beeing as cute as MSN and/or trillian. She missed the wiggles and that electroshocking in the screen...other than that, this girl that doesn't even know how to use system restore in winXP, was quite happy with the hoary live cd experience.

    there are still issues to be solved in the gnu/linux usage, but i feel them to be more of landmine cleaning than a problem with the distro's. I explain:

    since microsoft has the monopoly, most hardware produced is geared to windows, and not only the scanners and printers and tablets, for instance I would like to have siemens mobile phone manager in my ubuntu, but no, they only have it for windows, and they also, somehow got a sync to Outlook in the middle, so they at siemens assume that everyone uses microsoft windows? This has to be reversed, somehow. And it's this kind of small things that prevents more users migrating to free OS's, that and eyecandy and fluffy effects on messenger software. Because the rest, in what really matters performance, office, stability, security it is more than ready. I mean, I am an end-user with only one skill: I can read an HowTo, and that is useful in both microsoft and free OSs.

    I still have a xp in another partition, but everytime I change a usb cable for sake of my personal confort, the blasted thing detects new hardware, wich I find really annoying. Or the system, freezes everytime i try to shutdown, restart. And virus. And constant crashing. And the infernal updates. Not beeing able to unistall IE.
    Same computer. Clean installs. A very diferent outcome. But heck, maybe I'm to stupid to install windows from scratch.

  4. #114
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    seoul, korea
    Beans
    130
    Distro
    Ubuntu Breezy 5.10

    Re: ubuntu ready for end-users?

    i voted for yes hoary will be ready for average-desktop-users

  5. #115
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    404
    Beans
    149

    Re: ubuntu ready for end-users?

    No,

    Many people are not going to expect or want to use CLI for anything, simple as that. They will want/need point & click and only point & click. That's just the way it is now.

    In that sense OS X is ready, ubuntu is not.


    EDIT: Remember this is going by definitions in the first post.
    I define an average-desktop-user as :

    users who have never worked with a computer
    users who have only worked with windows XP
    users who just want it to work
    Last edited by weekend warrior; May 22nd, 2005 at 04:02 PM.

  6. #116
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Beans
    269

    Re: ubuntu ready for end-users?

    I think the great majority of the software is acceptable for end-users. There are some glaring exceptions (try backing up a dvd video natively!) The big problem is still hardware drivers. Device manufacturers are still not thinking "Hey - we will lose market share if we don't issue linux drivers." Even those that "support" linux do it as an afterthought and like they are doing us a favour. I think we are not direct and vocal enough about our dissatisfaction. All the distribution vendors need to make a representative body that provides a single reference point for hardware manufacturers that encourages them to support linux and also makes it easy for them by not requiring them to make 50 different builds.

    Once all the hardware drivers are written by the hardware manufacturers, then Linux will be ready.

    ciao
    bb

  7. #117
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Geneva, Switzerland
    Beans
    976
    Distro
    Ubuntu 13.04 Raring Ringtail

    Re: ubuntu ready for end-users?

    In my opinion, Ubuntu works great out-of-the-box, but if the end-user wants some specific features (like a graphic driver or a higher resolution), he/she must be guided by someone else.

  8. #118

    Re: ubuntu ready for end-users?

    One of the problems with Win and Mac (IMHO) is the way they kind of hide what's really happening underneath their polished surfaces. This is partly consumer-led (people just want it to be easy), but it also conveniently (for the OS company) encourages people to depend on that particular operating system for their conceptual model of their computer.

    And an even bigger problem is that Joe User isn't just happy with this system - he feels threatened if one tries to suggest that he might get more from his machine if he didn't rely on someone else to tell him how it works.

    How many people would go to buy a car and allow the salesman to tell them which car they want?


    I answered "Other" in the poll. I think that Ubuntu is perfectly good for the "end-user". Heck, our gran uses it!

    But how many people buy a Windows PC that isn't pre-installed? Installing any operating system is beyond many users, without some training or guidance. But I think that anyone who can install and trouble-shoot another operating system should be fairly comfortable with Ubuntu.


    By the way, my personal spin is that I work for an arts/IT organisation that works only with Linux and open-source, and I often talk Linux-newcomers through installing Linux on older machines. I've not met anyone that can't cope with Mand(rake/riva) or Ubuntu.

    Based on my experiences, I think the best thing the open-source community can do is encourage more people to learn more about the architecture of their machines, and open their eyes to the choice and freedom available with Linux/O-S. Distros like Ubuntu are not just good because they give people what they're used to for free. They're good because they give people the enthusiasm and the confidence to do MORE with the technology.
    Last edited by Sleeper Service; May 25th, 2005 at 10:35 AM.
    not enough is being done for the apathetic.

  9. #119
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Beans
    22

    Re: ubuntu ready for end-users?

    I've still had a few issues with wireless internet (most of which I've been able to work out by reading and asking around):

    Managing multiple 'net connections isn't quite there yet (if you're connected to ethernet and wireless at the same time, neither works right until you turn one off).

    If you aren't connected to the 'net on startup, the boot sits there for a good minute or so looking for the nonexistent connection.

    Only WEP out of the box for wireless security

    Other than that, I realize there's not much that can be done for out-of-the-box multimedia. Simply grabbing the GStreamer ffmpeg plugin seems to fix that, though.

    As far as playing embedded web media... how's Totem doing on their browser plugin?

  10. #120
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Beans
    200

    Re: ubuntu ready for end-users?

    Quote Originally Posted by MechR
    I've still had a few issues with wireless internet (most of which I've been able to work out by reading and asking around):

    Managing multiple 'net connections isn't quite there yet (if you're connected to ethernet and wireless at the same time, neither works right until you turn one off).

    If you aren't connected to the 'net on startup, the boot sits there for a good minute or so looking for the nonexistent connection.

    Only WEP out of the box for wireless security

    Other than that, I realize there's not much that can be done for out-of-the-box multimedia. Simply grabbing the GStreamer ffmpeg plugin seems to fix that, though.

    As far as playing embedded web media... how's Totem doing on their browser plugin?

    You can fix the stall at the boot for network devices (if the cable is unplugged) by
    sudo gedit /etc/dhcp3/dhclient.conf

    and change timout from 60 to 1 or 5 seconds. no real reason to have anything but 1.

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