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Thread: how to: automatically umount cifs partitions

  1. #121
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    Re: how to: automatically umount cifs partitions

    Yes, i changed all three scripts.

  2. #122
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    Feb 2007
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    33

    Re: how to: automatically umount cifs partitions

    Quote Originally Posted by kaiben View Post
    Yes, i changed all three scripts.
    Mmmm... Sorry, I can't suggest anything else.

    First, it's very odd that Sander Marechal's umountcifs script has stopped working in Jaunty. Secondly, it's very odd that changes to the priority of the 'stop' in rc0.d and rc6.d are not working as expected.

    Given this has just appeared, I'm wondering whether it's something to do with the new Upstart in Jaunty, which now controls the boot and shutdown processes.

    (I notice that Sander Marechal mentioned such a possibility in this thread last year, here
    http://ubuntuforums.org/showpost.php...1&postcount=65
    and I'm guessing the changes just introduced may have messed up the fixes involving external scripts in some way)

    But I'm way out of my depth now. Let's hope someone who really understands this stuff can make sense of what's going on, and find a permanent fix for this longstanding bug, which has been plaguing Ubuntu for three years:
    https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+s...nit/+bug/42121

  3. #123
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
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    New Zealand
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    826
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    Ubuntu 9.04 Jaunty Jackalope

    Re: how to: automatically umount cifs partitions

    Strange, I have umountnfs.sh as k15 (i.e. it runs third).

    This has been running fine and has not been affected by the upgrade to Jaunty.
    Veloce
    Ubuntu 9.04 64bit on Dell Vostro 1510, Core2 Duo T8100, Nvidia 8400M , Intel 1395 Wireless.
    OK: Wireless, kvm, Canon irc2880, Synergy.

  4. #124
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    Feb 2007
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    Re: how to: automatically umount cifs partitions

    Update on this issue with Jaunty. I'd upgraded an old Dell Inspiron laptop from Intrepid, and that was the machine on which the umountcifs script stopped working.

    I've just done a clean install of Jaunty on this laptop, and on an old Compaq PC. I installed the script on both.

    The desktop shut down fine with umountcifs being called at K02 in rc0.d and rc6.d; but the laptop - with exactly the same set up - suffered the CIFS VFS error.

    Importantly, the desktop has a PCI network card, but the laptop has a PCMCIA wifi card. The problem is clearly to do with a difference in the relative positions in the shutdown sequence that the shares are unmounted and different types of interface are closed.

    So I tried setting umountcifs to K00 on the laptop. It shuts down OK now (though there is a brief flicker out to a terminal during the GUI shutdown sequence - probably something to do with putting umountcifs before gdm.)

    Hope this helps someone with their investigations.

  5. #125
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    Mar 2006
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    Ubuntu 11.04 Natty Narwhal

    Re: how to: automatically umount cifs partitions

    Quote Originally Posted by diana.artemis View Post
    Update on this issue with Jaunty. I'd upgraded an old Dell Inspiron laptop from Intrepid, and that was the machine on which the umountcifs script stopped working.

    I've just done a clean install of Jaunty on this laptop, and on an old Compaq PC. I installed the script on both.

    The desktop shut down fine with umountcifs being called at K02 in rc0.d and rc6.d; but the laptop - with exactly the same set up - suffered the CIFS VFS error.

    Importantly, the desktop has a PCI network card, but the laptop has a PCMCIA wifi card. The problem is clearly to do with a difference in the relative positions in the shutdown sequence that the shares are unmounted and different types of interface are closed.

    So I tried setting umountcifs to K00 on the laptop. It shuts down OK now (though there is a brief flicker out to a terminal during the GUI shutdown sequence - probably something to do with putting umountcifs before gdm.)

    Hope this helps someone with their investigations.
    Are you using network-manager to manage your wireless connection? Network-manager starts your network in userspace, so when you log off, your network connection (and thereby your share connection) terminates. You may be successful by running the unmount script during your session logout: http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=252935

  6. #126
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
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    Re: how to: automatically umount cifs partitions

    Quote Originally Posted by dmizer View Post
    Are you using network-manager to manage your wireless connection? Network-manager starts your network in userspace, so when you log off, your network connection (and thereby your share connection) terminates. You may be successful by running the unmount script during your session logout: http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=252935
    I just realised this issue occurs on both my laptops (not just the one with PCMCIA wifi interface). So, yes, I use network-manager for the wifi. But I'm afraid I don't know enough about bash scripts to follow your advice. The thread you pointed to suggests adding the script to the end of /etc/gdm/PostSession/Default; but I don't really feel confident about where or how to add umountcifs to this:

    Code:
    #!/bin/sh
    
    PATH="/usr/bin:$PATH:/bin:/usr/bin"
    OLD_IFS=$IFS
    
    gdmwhich () {
      COMMAND="$1"
      OUTPUT=
      IFS=:
      for dir in $PATH
      do
        if test -x "$dir/$COMMAND" ; then
          if test "x$OUTPUT" = "x" ; then
            OUTPUT="$dir/$COMMAND"
          fi
        fi
      done
      IFS=$OLD_IFS 
      echo "$OUTPUT"
    }
    
    exit 0
    I'd be grateful for any suggestions!

    (And then I guess it would also be necessary to revert the priorities in rc0.d and rc6.d to the defaults?)

  7. #127
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
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    Re: how to: automatically umount cifs partitions

    Quote Originally Posted by dmizer View Post
    ...Network-manager starts your network in userspace, so when you log off, your network connection (and thereby your share connection) terminates...
    Dmizer >>> Isn't that why

    K01umountnfs.sh
    K02gdm
    K03usplash

    works -- because it makes the nfs unmount *before* gdm shuts down? So what's the 'risk' of shutting down like that, rather than running the umountcifs script?

    Is it that the script checks whether any processes are using the mounted shares, and, if so, kills them before unmounting? What happens if they're still running when the shares are unmounted? Possible loss of data, I guess; but is that actually likely to happen in most real-world shutdowns by the user?

    Sorry to ask so many questions, but I don't know much about these processes, and am trying to get some inkling of what's going on here.

  8. #128
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    Kitakyushu Japan
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    Ubuntu 11.04 Natty Narwhal

    Re: how to: automatically umount cifs partitions

    Well, you said it's NOT working. That's why K01umountnfs.sh, K02gdm, and K03usplash /should/ work.

    As to the /etc/gdm/PostSession/Default, try putting your unmount script at the very top like so:
    Code:
    #!/bin/sh
    Your umount script here
    
    PATH="/usr/bin:$PATH:/bin:/usr/bin"
    OLD_IFS=$IFS
    
    gdmwhich () {
      COMMAND="$1"
      OUTPUT=
      IFS=:
      for dir in $PATH
      do
        if test -x "$dir/$COMMAND" ; then
          if test "x$OUTPUT" = "x" ; then
            OUTPUT="$dir/$COMMAND"
          fi
        fi
      done
      IFS=$OLD_IFS 
      echo "$OUTPUT"
    }
    
    exit 0
    If worst comes to worst, it's easy enough to revert that file. If that doesn't work, please post the contents of your /etc/fstab if you've posted it before, I missed it.

  9. #129
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
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    33

    Re: how to: automatically umount cifs partitions

    Quote Originally Posted by dmizer View Post
    Well, you said it's NOT working. That's why K01umountnfs.sh, K02gdm, and K03usplash /should/ work.

    As to the /etc/gdm/PostSession/Default, try putting your unmount script at the very top like so...
    Thanks for your reply. I should have been clearer - the K01/K02/K03 set up as above does indeed work fine. And I could actually live with that.

    But I wasn't sure how 'safe' it is (from the point of view of data loss/corruption during the shutdown). As I understand it, the umountcifs script actually checks for processes using the shares, and kills them before unmounting the shares; but I don't think umountnfs.sh does that, so I assumed it relied on some other script to look after that first? Is that so, or is it safe to leave the K01umountnfs.sh / K02gdm / K03usplash set up to do the job safely?

    Not being sure about this, I thought I'd try to get the umountcifs script working properly on my wifi machines, and that's why I came back with the questions above.

    Thanks very much for your suggestion about hacking /etc/gdm/PostSession/Default. Do you reckon that would be a better method? If so, I'll put the rc0. and rc6.d scripts back in the right order, and try the hack, when I've got a few minutes.

  10. #130
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Kitakyushu Japan
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    9,361
    Distro
    Ubuntu 11.04 Natty Narwhal

    Re: how to: automatically umount cifs partitions

    Hacking /etc/gdm/PostSession/Default shouldn't be necessary for cifs. For NFS, just add the "soft" option to your nfs fstab line. Then it can unmount normally during shutdown even if the network is not active.

    Like this:
    Code:
    server.mydomain.com:/files /files nfs soft,rsize=8192,wsize=8192,timeo=14,intr
    FYI from man nfs:
    Code:
           soft / hard    Determines the recovery behavior of the NFS client after
                          an NFS request times out.  If neither option  is  speci‐
                          fied  (or if the hard option is specified), NFS requests
                          are retried indefinitely.  If the soft option is  speci‐
                          fied,  then  the  NFS  client fails an NFS request after
                          retrans retransmissions have been sent, causing the  NFS
                          client to return an error to the calling application.
    
                          NB:  A  so-called  "soft"  timeout can cause silent data
                          corruption in certain  cases.  As  such,  use  the  soft
                          option only when client responsiveness is more important
                          than data integrity.  Using NFS over TCP  or  increasing
                          the value of the retrans option may mitigate some of the
                          risks of using the soft option.
    Emphasis mine.

    For example (default is 3):
    Code:
    server.mydomain.com:/files /files nfs soft,retrans=6,rsize=8192,wsize=8192,timeo=14,intr
    Last edited by dmizer; April 28th, 2009 at 05:52 PM. Reason: additional information and example/clarity

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