Page 3 of 53 FirstFirst 1234513 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 521

Thread: HOWTO: NFS Server/Client

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Beans
    204

    Re: HOWTO: NFS Server/Client

    This works really nice, way better then samba - and much faster.

    But I have one question, I coulnd't find a solution with a 'quick' google search.

    When PC1 is on, and I boot up PC2, fstab automounts the shared folder on PC1. But how do I get PC1 to automount the shared folder on PC2 after PC2 boots up? I can mount it manually, but I thought it would be nice if it happens automaticly.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Kitakyushu Japan
    Beans
    9,361
    Distro
    Ubuntu 11.04 Natty Narwhal

    Re: HOWTO: NFS Server/Client

    as far as i know, there is no way to make a previously booted machine detect that a server share has just come online.

    edit: typed "samba" from sheer habit.
    Last edited by dmizer; November 2nd, 2006 at 03:27 AM.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Beans
    204

    Re: HOWTO: NFS Server/Client

    I'm not using samba, but NFS.

    And I indeed couldn't find a program which did it, so today I learned some basic bash scripting, and wrote a script which can detect if the other computer is online, and automaticly mounts the shared folder. If the other computer goes offline it will unmount the shared folder. See:

    http://www.ubuntuforums.org/showthre...52#post1699752

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Beans
    455
    Distro
    Kubuntu

    Re: HOWTO: NFS Server/Client

    192.168.1.1/24 does not mean 192.168.1.1 - 192.168.1.255

    It means 192.168.1.1 - 192.168.1.24
    You would want 192.168.1.1/255 for that effect

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Ann Arbor, MI
    Beans
    249
    Distro
    Ubuntu 6.10 Edgy

    Re: HOWTO: NFS Server/Client

    Quote Originally Posted by marx2k View Post
    192.168.1.1/24 does not mean 192.168.1.1 - 192.168.1.255

    It means 192.168.1.1 - 192.168.1.24
    You would want 192.168.1.1/255 for that effect
    You obviously don't know what you're talking about. 192.168.1.1/24 does exactly what he said it should, allow access to 192.168.1.1-192.168.1.255. An IP address is 32 bits and the /n means the n most significant bits of the IP address must match the given IP address to connect. So in this case the first 24 bits, or the 192.168.1 part must match. As another example if you had 192.168.1.1/8, anything that had an address of 192.x.y.z would be able to connect with the server since each group is 8 bits.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Beans
    555
    Distro
    Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx

    Question Re: HOWTO: NFS Server/Client

    Hi folks--

    Hope you can help with this twist on what you are doing.

    My server is a Red Hat 9.0 machine.

    My fstab is

    Code:
    samba1:/vol22   /sam/vol22      nfs     rw,hard,intr   0       0
    But when I try to do anything in this /vol22 directory, it says permission denied.

    Now I suspect the problem is that my user's uid on my Ubuntu 6.06 box is 1000, while on the red hat 9.0 box it is 1000. I would prefer to change the UID on the Ubuntu box. I tried changing /etc/passwd where it says 1000:1000 to 500:500, and the Ubuntu box no longer lets me do anything (one error message actually said: "You don't exist, go away!"). So I changed that back. I tried changing it to 1000:500 and to 500:1000 but both give me tne permission denied error.

    Of course, I might be guessing wrong as to the problem.

    Any ideas how I can troubleshoot this?

    Thanks!

    :- Doug.
    :- Doug.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Kitakyushu Japan
    Beans
    9,361
    Distro
    Ubuntu 11.04 Natty Narwhal

    Re: HOWTO: NFS Server/Client

    Quote Originally Posted by dgermann View Post
    Any ideas how I can troubleshoot this?
    start with your redhat box. the folder you're trying to connect to (vol22) is where your permission problems are.

    don't know anything about RH file structure, so i don't know where /vol22 is, but you won't be able to write to your entire drive. you'll only be able to write to folders which have user level permissions (eg. /home).

    so you can tackle this one in a couple of ways:
    1) make a folder on your RH box chmodded so that your RH login (not root) has full read and write access to it.
    <or>
    2) mount your /home directory instead of /vol22 on your RH box.

    this way, your remote access will have write permissions to the folder.

    if you want full system read/write access to your RH box, just use ssh/scp

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Vancouver
    Beans
    Hidden!
    Distro
    The Feisty Fawn Testing

    Re: HOWTO: NFS Server/Client

    Quote Originally Posted by marx2k View Post
    192.168.1.1/24 does not mean 192.168.1.1 - 192.168.1.255

    It means 192.168.1.1 - 192.168.1.24
    You would want 192.168.1.1/255 for that effect
    No it doesn't. The x.x.x.x/y notation is CIDR notation.

    192.168.1.1/24 means the IP address of 192.168.1.1 with a CIDR of /24, or class 1 C network, and netmask of 255.255.255.000. This effective means a range from 192.168.1.0 to 192.168.1.255, 256 hosts.
    The /255 does not exist. The highest you can get is /32 which is a netmask of 255.255.255.255 or a single IP address.

    To better understand: the network mask (netmask) or subnet mask is a number that identifies the part of the IP that is a network address and the part that is a computer address. Think of it in binary as the netmask uses binary 1 values to represent the network portion of an address and binary 0 values to represent the computer address.

    The network part is expressed in base 10 (our regular numbering system) and are either values of 0 or 255.
    255 is a network byte
    0 is a computer byte
    other value will be part network, part computer.

    The netmask can also be expressed as a single number representing the number of network bits in the address. This is the CIDR slash notation.
    E.g. 169.254.5.40/16 is equivalent to 169.254.5.40 with a netmask of 255.255.0.0.
    The /16 shows the network portion to be two 8-bit bytes, or 16 bits (8x2). As such there will be 65536 hosts.

    The CIDR number comes from the number of 1's in the subnet mask when converted to binary.
    The common subnet mask 255.255.255.0 is 11111111.11111111.11111111.00000000 in binary. This adds up to 24 1's, or /24 (pronounced 'slash twenty four').
    A subnet mask of 255.255.255.192 is 11111111.11111111.11111111.11000000 in binary, or 26 1's, hence a /26.

    sorry neilp85 didn't see your post
    Last edited by etienne.navarro; November 9th, 2006 at 01:07 AM. Reason: redundancy

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Beans
    555
    Distro
    Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx

    Question Re: HOWTO: NFS Server/Client

    dmizer--

    Thanks for being so helpful.

    On the redhat server, most of the directories within /vol22 are set to 766 permissions. The /etc/fstab in Ubuntu is
    Code:
    samba1:/vol22   /sam/vol22      nfs     rw,hard,intr   0       0
    and this shows up as this on the Ubuntu client when mounted as cifs:
    Code:
    [root@samba1 vol22]# ls -alh
    total 816K
    drwxrw-rw-   14 data     data         4.0K Nov  6 19:03 .
    drwxr-xr-x   28 root     root         4.0K Oct  4 11:20 ..
    drwxrw-rw-    8 data     data         4.0K Jul 16 21:50 comm
    drwxrw-rw-  136 data     data         8.0K Nov  2 13:35 data
    (I have edited out some entries to save space here.)

    When mounted as nfs, it reports:
    Code:
    doug@doug2:~$ ls -alh /sam/vol22
    total 0
    ?--------- ? ? ? ?                ? /sam/vol22/.
    ?--------- ? ? ? ?                ? /sam/vol22/..
    ?--------- ? ? ? ?                ? /sam/vol22/comm
    ?--------- ? ? ? ?                ? /sam/vol22/data
    redhat's file structure is generally plain vanilla linux, so /vol22 is a directory just off /, same as /etc or /usr would be.

    I wonder if ssh/scp will work since what I am doing is running OOo against these network files?

    In any event, I think the redhat box is set up OK. At least it runs OK for accessing these files and directories using a cifs mount.

    So what else might I be missing here?

    I see you have both a samba and nfs howto, so it sounds like you are the person I need to be talking to!

    Thanks for your help.

    :- Doug.
    :- Doug.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Kitakyushu Japan
    Beans
    9,361
    Distro
    Ubuntu 11.04 Natty Narwhal

    Re: HOWTO: NFS Server/Client

    lol ... i also have a fedora core box, but i haven't looked at redhat in so long, i don't know what they're doing over there.

    how did you figure out how to configure your redhat box? if you used this howto to set up both boxes, it's not going to work. something's missing on the authentication for fedoracore that i haven't had the time to figure out yet.

    but ... this looks promising: http://forums.fedoraforum.org/showthread.php?t=102621

Page 3 of 53 FirstFirst 1234513 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •