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Thread: Temperature monitoring of overheating PC

  1. #21
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    Re: What does temp1 in lm-sensors mean?

    Yeah, I'm thinking OP wanted more than just the input I was giving in the other thread and tried to be somewhat subtle about it. Was curious how that would go so I didn't poke my nose into this one until OP's issue appeared to be resolved.

  2. #22
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    Re: Temperature monitoring of overheating PC

    I think "normal" really depends upon the design. That's why I go searching for the original manufacturer's specs on the specific model of whatever device I'm dealing with. Unfortunately, it seems AMD's got the documentation for older devices on a server that isn't functioning right now (or they've screwed up the web address for reaching it), so I'm SOL and just making educated guesses based upon as many other sources of relevant info I can find. Even found an in-depth review of my exact processor that was several pages long, but still didn't mention this particular info. *sigh*

    You might start here for your processor info.
    Last edited by Sanctimonious_Ape; August 19th, 2014 at 09:41 AM.

  3. #23
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    Re: Temperature monitoring of overheating PC

    Quote Originally Posted by dave131 View Post
    What are the "normal" temps for things like CPU's? This laptop has Intel Core 2 Duo and it's showing both cpu's in the upper 40's (in Celsius), with a max in the very low 50's.

    What are the "normal" ranges on things like hard disks, SSD's, etc.?
    depends on the model. the one in raspberry pi for example can run quite high and does not need a cooler.for example: http://www.mobileappsystems.com/blog...ervolting#test

    btw I just struggled with older dualcore Celeron and in the end after cleaning and reapplying the paste I got 40-50C (much better than 70-90C and then shutdown...). I have single core Athlon that runs at 35C. now these Athlons they can be overclocked quite a bit. in which case they would run hotter and would need extra cooling. but I never did it or felt the need.

    you also have motherboard "CPU" and the temp from that is also usually measured.

    disks also depend. I had a WD black that was working for over 10 years with no issues. and the temp keep showing it to be quite hot (I think it was around 46 C). anyway when it broke down it was the controller it seems (or rather one of capacitors inside) not the disk. I can actually still use that disk just not for OS as it couldn't boot from it well anymore.

    my point it get you model number and all that and then check the specs online. some CPU run cooler than others. I know some older Athlons were running quite hot as well as some Pentiums. between 30 and 60 C would be something of a normal temp range for desktop CPU. not sure about mobile, since they have less space to move the air around.
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  4. #24
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    Re: Temperature monitoring of overheating PC

    @sanctimonious ape; Yep, I have to agree with you about disassembling laptops! It's a nightmare (or can be if you're not meticulous about noting where every little bit came from, and keeping them in some sort of order. I normally lay everything out on a sheet of cardboard)...

    In a way I suppose I'm lucky, in that my laptop is a very elderly Dell Inspiron of approx 2002 vintage; it's a 'brick' by modern standards (compared to something like a current Macbook Air, say), largely due to the sheer size of the battery pack.....but it has significantly more space to play with, and therefore it's easier to clean out.

    My current 'rig' is a 2004-vintage HP/Compaq Presario SR1619UK desktop PC.

    http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/d...roduct=1147955

    It uses an MSI motherboard that MSI won't even admit to having made, since I believe their policy on manufacturing under license was that the licensee should assume responsibility for the product, once it was received! I did manage to find an owner's handbook for it, however:-

    http://www.elhvb.com/mboards/oem/hp/...stM_manual.pdf

    Now, with it being a tower, and having large amounts of space, and several fans, you would think "How could it possibly overheat?" It was inherited from my sister about 7 months ago. She had it from new, and was getting rid of it, since, like most non-technical people, she was worried about OS end-of-life (it used to run Win XP).

    My bro-in-law is a DIY fanatic, and sis has spent the larger part of her marriage living in what amounts at times to a building site! I always clean anything electronic, if it's second-hand, and that was what I did with the Presario. I took the CPU fan off to have a look at the cooler, and was glad I had.....the heatsink was clogged solid with brick dust, and fluff, and other assorted crap. Sis only ever used to buy and sell stuff on Amazon, and play 'The Sims' on it, so it had a very easy life with her, and is consequently in 'good nick' for it's age..!

    Cleaning it out lowered the CPU temp (Temp1 on Psensor) from high 40's to high 20's/low 30's.....and I 'spring-clean' it every 3 months, too. However, I'm led to believe that AMD's temp sensors don't report as accurately as Intel's , so it may not be running as cool as I think it is..!

    ================================================== ============================

    @dave131; If you have a look here, this site will tell you all you ever wanted to know about your CPU; just enter the relevant bits of info in the right places, or be patient and spend a few minutes browsing through it.....

    http://www.cpu-world.com

    CPU temps (as I understand it) can range wildly, anywhere from my own relatively low temps (low to mid 30's normally, though in the depths of winter I HAVE seen it start as low as 17c!), up to high 70's/low 80's even, depending on location and usage. Laptops have very convoluted, narrow airways, and consequently run quite warm (modern netbooks and stuff are better in this respect, since they run on considerably lower voltages.....and it's higher voltages that produce that heat).

    Towers, on the other hand, have far more space and usually lots more fans and bigger heatsinks to dissipate the heat generated.

    I'm not an expert by any means; most manufacturers seem to quote 60c as being a maximum for hard drives, (though some, like Seagate, tend to quote lower) although general rule of thumb is that anything over 50c for prolonged periods does NOT do a hard drive much good.

    SSD's, I haven't had anything to do with, so can't really help you there, but this post may help:-

    http://www.mmo-champion.com/threads/...-High-SSD-Temp, as may this:-

    http://www.buildcomputers.net/hdd-temperature.html

    Hope that helps.

    Regards,

    Mike.
    Last edited by Mike_Walsh; August 19th, 2014 at 01:54 PM.
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  5. #25
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    Re: Temperature monitoring of overheating PC

    Thanks for the replies on what the normals are. I know it helps me and believe it will help anyone else who reads this thread now or in the future.

  6. #26
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    Re: What does temp1 in lm-sensors mean?

    Dave, I'm not sure how to ask to merge the two threads. In my mind they are related, but kind of different. It would be fine with me to merge them. R.

  7. #27
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    Re: What does temp1 in lm-sensors mean?

    All, I looked around on the web and I think temp1 may be the temperature at the base of the CPU die and acpitz-virtual-0 stands for acpi temperature zone virtual device 0 or something similar. I think people may be correct that the temp1s I am getting are normal for this laptop. It definitely seems to be running cooler since I took it apart, oiled the fan, cleaned out the dust and added new thermal paste to the heat sink. I've been watching my temp1. With the CPU in "idle" temp1 varies between about 51C and 55C. When temp1 gets up to about 54 or 55C, the fan comes on briefly for about 108 seconds. Then temp1 drops down to 51C, the fan shuts off for about 24 seconds, the temp slowly goes up to 54 or 55 C and the cycle repeats. It does this in both Windows XP and in Ubuntu. Using Speedfan 4.49 in Windows XP, when I first turn on the PC, temp1 is about 40C and rated OK. After some time temp1 slowly starts to rise. Temp1s of 41C to 49C are rated with a red arrow pointing upward. Temp1s 50 up to 55 are rated with a little red flame beside it. Since this Speedfan rates these temps high with a flame, I am somewhat concerned. Perhaps temp1 is still too high. Regarding the meaning of temp1, temp1 seems to be associated with "sys/class/thermal/thermal_zone0" in the app “Temperature Monitor” in Ubuntu and in Ubuntu in the app “lm-sensors” I get this output: acpitz-virtual-0 Adapter: Virtual device temp1: +51.0°C (crit = +110.0°C) Any more comments will be welcomed, but I am probably OK now. Thanks Dave, Ape, DeadFlwr, and J R.
    Last edited by RMcGinnis; August 22nd, 2014 at 05:04 AM.

  8. #28
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    Re: What does temp1 in lm-sensors mean?

    You can research what your processor maximum temperature is rated to. Most are rated to 110C so if you were running 77C and the BIOS has a safety shutdown temperature at 90C then you could hit that quickly. 55C is high for most processors, but an older, 90 nm process, 90-watt Total Dissipated Power (TDP) processor it is probably normal. I had an audio server running Xeon's at 75C and it only lasted 3 years (24/7), so higher temperatures mean shorter life. The replacement server runs at 64C--obvious design changes. The closer you run to the maximum rated temperature, the shorter the expected life of the processor. Normally the motherboard fails (delaminates) under the CPU at higher temperatures and fails before the CPU.

    Since most laptops are designed for 3-4 years, you have gotten double the life expectancy. By cleaning and reseating, you can go another 8 years!
    Last edited by tgalati4; August 23rd, 2014 at 03:08 PM.
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  9. #29
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    Re: What does temp1 in lm-sensors mean?

    Quote Originally Posted by RMcGinnis View Post
    Dave, I'm not sure how to ask to merge the two threads. In my mind they are related, but kind of different. It would be fine with me to merge them. R.
    In the lower left of each message I see a "Report post" button. You can press that and send a message to the forum moderators; in that message you can ask them to merge the two threads.

    I'm participating in a couple of other threads dealing with this same sensor since on one of my machines it seems to be frozen at 40 degrees C no matter what the CPU is doing, and was told that for AMD chips the sensor module never reports accurately so it's advisable to add or subtract an offset to get closer to the actual temperature. It's quite possible that your Windows program and lm-sensors are doing this and using different offsets! Personally, I'd trust speedfan more than lm-sensors, if dual-booting, since it seems to be much better maintained... However I wouldn't run Windows just to be able to use speedfan!
    Last edited by JKyleOKC; August 22nd, 2014 at 07:33 PM. Reason: additional info
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  10. #30
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    Re: What does temp1 in lm-sensors mean?

    Thanks tgalati4, The specs for my CPU are at http://ark.intel.com/products/27146/...Hz-400-MHz-FSB. Max TDP is 21 Watts and lithography is 90 nm. So maybe it is OK, but the Max TDP is significantly higher than 90 Watts. Interestingly, there is a review of thermal pastes at this link http://skinneelabs.com/2011-thermal-...-comparison/2/ . The paste I used, Arctic Silver Ceramique2, is not that highly rated, so it might be worth trying to lower the temps with another kind of paste. I suppose modifying the heatsink in some truly knowledgeable way might be an option too. I've raised the bottom of the laptop up on bottle caps, that may be helping some too. Any other comments from you tgalati4 or anybody else would be welcomed. Thanks, R.

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