Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 16 of 16

Thread: Easy way to install programs

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Beans
    7

    Re: Easy way to install programs

    Thanks guy's, this is a lot of answers!

    Firstly, I must have not been using Software Centre correctly because I've just had a look and found Eclipse(embarrassing!).

    Thanks to 23dornot23d who gave me the correct sudo command for installing Eclipse.

    To grumblebum2 you're absolutely right, sorry
    Ubi_one_2014, no offence, but I didn't understand a single character of what you replied with

    But, not to be a complainer or anything but I was using Eclipse as an example because all of this, in my Windows opinion, isn't easy.
    Isn't there a thing where I can just click a button, like you do on an EXE file in Windows, and it'll install it?

    I mean, I've found .deb files fairly easy but the only application I've found in one of those is Google Chrome.

    As Garfield and Oliver Twist said:

    Please sir may I have some more answers?

    Thanks again,

    DreddTrekkiter

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Marcellus, NY USA
    Beans
    265
    Distro
    Ubuntu 16.04 Xenial Xerus

    Re: Easy way to install programs

    I'm far from being an expert in Ubuntu but, for me anyway, the best solution to installing software that isn't in the Ubuntu repositories is to find and add a ppa that includes the software I want. That way the program installs and updates correctly. I have always been under the impression that this is the 'Ubuntu way'. Is that not correct?

    By the way, there are .deb files that install similarly to what an .exe install file would in windows. I don't think these update automatically however. Someone please correct me if I'm wrong.

    [edit]
    I did some checking around and apparently some .deb files will add an entry in your software sources so the program can be kept up to date. I guess this is not always the case however. See this:

    http://askubuntu.com/questions/19014...ps-get-updates
    Last edited by jeremy1138; April 29th, 2014 at 03:20 PM. Reason: more info
    Registered Linux User # 451883 - Registered Ubuntu User # 16711

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Beans
    3,034

    Re: Easy way to install programs

    Eclipse doesn't need compile or install, it comes as a binary which you can just click and use. Download from its own website, extract the tarball to your home and go into the folder and click eclipse, that's it. Can't be easier.

    You can get it from the repo but chances are it is an older version and it will bring in a lot of depenencies.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Beans
    2,298
    Distro
    Ubuntu

    Re: Easy way to install programs

    Quote Originally Posted by DreddTrekkiter View Post

    Isn't there a thing where I can just click a button, like you do on an EXE file in Windows, and it'll install it?

    Software in Ubuntu's repositorities -- tens of thousands -- *is* packaged in .deb format and can be installed with a click. Applications like the Software Center and Synaptic simply avoid the inconvenience of making you do a separate download and a separate install by doing both at the same time, as well as locating, downloading and install any needed support packages (dependencies).

    In a default Ubuntu installation, if you do download a .deb package intended for installation on Ubuntu -- like that Chrome package you mentioned -- and click on it, the Software Center application should open and offer to install it. You can use other applications to install .deb pacakges. One called "gdebi" is popular. once gdbei is installed, you can affect the switch by right clicking on a .deb file and selecting 'Properties".

    The command line equivalent is "sudo apt-get install <package_name>". This will download the package, determine what the dependencies are, and download and install the lot.

    However the install is triggered, the same things happen. (A Linux system is, at heart, a multi-user system capable of supporting multiple simultaneous users running on *one* machine. Hence, a user requires permission to alter any part of the filesystem apart from his or her own home directory. That happens when you install new software. That's what the "sudo" is for: It tells the system that you want to temporarily acquire the authority to install the software.)

    As a rule, the first place you should look for software is in Ubuntu's repositories. Software is also available in repositories called PPA's. These are not officially supported, so you are dependent on the person(s) posting that software for fixes, security updates, etc.

    Other Linux distributions use the .deb package format. You should avoid installing packages intended for those other systems. If nothing else, file system layouts differ somewhat among distributions, so the installation instructions contained in the package may not work at all or work incorrectly.

    Given Ubuntu's popularity, it is rare to come across software that has not been packaged for installation on Ubuntu. The exception is commercial software whose vendors, if they release for Linux at all, often do it late.

    As mentioned earlier, archive files -- typically ending in ".tar.gz" or some variation of ".zip" -- are not intended to be user installable packages. They are collections of files -- archives -- bundled together for convenience. Their contents can be extracted, but that amounts to dumping the files into the current directory. Their targetted use is to archive source code.
    Last edited by buzzingrobot; April 29th, 2014 at 03:22 PM.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Beans
    3,034

    Re: Easy way to install programs

    Quote Originally Posted by buzzingrobot View Post
    In a default Ubuntu installation, if you do download a .deb package intended for installation on Ubuntu -- like that Chrome package you mentioned -- and click on it, the Software Center application should open and offer to install it. You can use other applications to install .deb pacakges. One called "gdebi" is popular. once gdbei is installed, you can affect the switch by right clicking on a .deb file and selecting 'Properties".

    .
    BTW there is a gdebi bug in 14.04, it doesn't install dependencies automatically as it should (so have to run "sudo apt-get -f install" after running gdebi), I see a gdebi package in proposed updates so it is probably fixed.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Beans
    2,298
    Distro
    Ubuntu

    Re: Easy way to install programs

    Quote Originally Posted by monkeybrain20122 View Post
    BTW there is a gdebi bug in 14.04, it doesn't install dependencies automatically as it should (so have to run "sudo apt-get -f install" after running gdebi), I see a gdebi package in proposed updates so it is probably fixed.
    Thanks! Good to know.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •