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Thread: Which smartphone should I consider using if I use Ubuntu?

  1. #11
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    Re: Which smartphone should I consider using if I use Ubuntu?

    Quote Originally Posted by 3rdalbum View Post
    I logged in specially to reply to this.
    ....

    As for me, I've also kept with Android. Recently bought a Motorola Moto G (their phones are great now that Google owns them)....
    Google sold Motorola to Lenovo for around $10billion in losses. Some Motorolas were made in the USA, but now i am sure all will be made in China. No more American designed and manufactured phones.
    Last edited by rjt69; March 1st, 2014 at 05:46 PM.

  2. #12
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    Re: Which smartphone should I consider using if I use Ubuntu?

    Quote Originally Posted by rjt69 View Post
    One good tactic in choosing a phone is to look at xda-developers or android forums as to which phones are easier to root and have the best support for alternative ROMS. Take a look at the list of device supported by CyanogenMod.
    What would I need rooting and CyanogenMod for? Would it impact the stability of my device and do I have an easier time rolling back?

    My younger brother has an iPod Touch, and he's been experimenting a lot with rooting it and installing new tweaks. Eventually, he has reinstalled the iOS to the newer stock version, without the rooting, and he's only using official apps now. I believe he couldn't have reinstalled it to the stock older one, because he hasn't saved the certificates beforehand or something. Is the situation different with Android?

    Thank you for registering and answering to my question in detail, 3rdalbum. I'll abswer to it in detail a bit later.

  3. #13
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    Re: Which smartphone should I consider using if I use Ubuntu?

    Quote Originally Posted by Nickolai_Leschov View Post
    What would I need rooting and CyanogenMod for? Would it impact the stability of my device and do I have an easier time rolling back?

    My younger brother has an iPod Touch, and he's been experimenting a lot with rooting it and installing new tweaks. Eventually, he has reinstalled the iOS to the newer stock version, without the rooting, and he's only using official apps now. I believe he couldn't have reinstalled it to the stock older one, because he hasn't saved the certificates beforehand or something. Is the situation different with Android?

    Thank you for registering and answering to my question in detail, 3rdalbum. I'll abswer to it in detail a bit later.
    I used to feel safer not having rooted my phone. Unrooted phones were safer in some ways, but most of the following reasons point to rooting as actually being safer:
    1. In the USA, depending on the particular plan with particular cellular providers, rooting and then installing an alternative ROM may be necessary to tether. I do not know anything about the situation in Russia.
    2. Historically, complete backups could only be done by rooting, but increasingly, more data is in the cloud automatically, mitigating the need for backups.
    3. Security, Motorola blur routes unencrypted passwords through Motorola servers and then forwards them on to Youtube, facebook, and picasa, so alternative firmware are not only safer in this instance, but actually much much faster.
    4. Privacy, there are software projects that increase your safety by giving fake GPS coordinates and other private information to apps. Maybe you want to install an application, but do not want to share your GPS coordinates, this can take care of that. When the app querys the phone number of the phone, it might give the app a fake phone number. I believe the app name is PDroid Manager.




    i am not aware of certificate problems with android devices. Manufacturers tried to instill Fear Uncertainty and Doubt by warning users that a "fuse" may be blown by unlocking, but it has not been a problem for me. Again, the best thing to do is to base the purchase of an android phone off of "certified device" lists from alternative firmware projects. Another reason to root via applications such as SafeStrap and to base a purchase decision from a list of known supported devices.
    Last edited by rjt69; March 1st, 2014 at 06:47 PM.

  4. #14
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    Re: Which smartphone should I consider using if I use Ubuntu?

    Quote Originally Posted by rjt69 View Post
    1. In the USA, depending on the particular plan with particular cellular providers, rooting and then installing an alternative ROM may be necessary to tether. I do not know anything about the situation in Russia.
    It's strange: I could not tether my ThinkPad running Ubuntu to iPad, over Wi-Fi. When I called support (Megafon, a leading cell provider in Russia) to ask if the feature is locked, and I should pay for it, they couldn't understand me. So it looks like cellular operators in Russia haven't figured this additional way to extract profit from their clients, but neither could I get any help. Later, I managed to get the tethering to work for me, but only intermittently, and, I believe, over Bluetooth, not Wi-Fi.
    Quote Originally Posted by rjt69 View Post
    2. Historically, complete backups could only be done by rooting, but increasingly, more data is in the cloud automatically, mitigating the need for backups.
    Well, more is not all.
    Quote Originally Posted by rjt69 View Post
    3. Security, Motorola blur routes unencrypted passwords through Motorola servers and then forwards them on to Youtube, facebook, and picasa, so alternative firmware are not only safer in this instance, but actually much much faster.
    4. Privacy, there are software projects that increase your safety by giving fake GPS coordinates and other private information to apps. Maybe you want to install an application, but do not want to share your GPS coordinates, this can take care of that. When the app querys the phone number of the phone, it might give the app a fake phone number. I believe the app name is PDroid Manager.
    That sounds creepy. But to have to hack your device to maybe stop it from compromising your privacy so badly somehow feels wrong to me: I'm not sure I worry much about privacy, but if I would... buying a device that works against you and hacking it to stop it from doing so (though you never know for sure if you've plugged all of the leaks, or even the major ones) looks like a losing battle to me.
    Anyway, what installing the alternative ROM actually IS: does it revert to the stock operating system by Google, plus hacks?

  5. #15
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    Re: Which smartphone should I consider using if I use Ubuntu?

    Quote Originally Posted by Nickolai_Leschov View Post
    That sounds creepy. But to have to hack your device to maybe stop it from compromising your privacy so badly somehow feels wrong to me: I'm not sure I worry much about privacy, but if I would... buying a device that works against you and hacking it to stop it from doing so (though you never know for sure if you've plugged all of the leaks, or even the major ones) looks like a losing battle to me.
    Anyway, what installing the alternative ROM actually IS: does it revert to the stock operating system by Google, plus hacks?
    Oh it is definitely wrong and creepy, but you will probably not know how much a Manufacturer or Cellular provider is trying to capture about your life untill you buy it and configure and capture packets for a long time. It can be done by disabling 3G and only enabling WiFi, but a complete analysis requires a rooted femtocell.

    One can root their manufacturer's default Android operating system which is usualy far from the google Android Open Source Project AOSP. So at this point, they have the same operating system with root.

    There are many alternative ROM projects based on Google Android AOSP, but which have nothing directly to do with Google. But yes, i believe, most all of the alternative ROM projects could be described as a modification of the Google AOSP. However, i am by no means an expert in all the various android ROMS, so maybe somebody else should chime in on that.

  6. #16
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    Re: Which smartphone should I consider using if I use Ubuntu?

    Quote Originally Posted by rjt69 View Post
    Motorola blur routes unencrypted passwords through Motorola servers and then forwards them on to Youtube, facebook, and picasa, so alternative firmware are not only safer in this instance, but actually much much faster.
    Motoblur does not ship on any current Motorola phones. I agree that it was terrible for many reasons, but Motoblur is dead.

    To answer somebody's post, I was aware of the proposed Motorola sale to Lenovo but I didn't know it had actually occurred. Still doesn't affect current phones though. I expect the next few Motorola phones will have a strong Google influence too, having been designed before the Lenovo acquisition.

  7. #17
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    Re: Which smartphone should I consider using if I use Ubuntu?

    I don't really see what Apple has in favor of any good smartphone on Android. They are different. The only thing is that you will be able to connect your android smartphone as a storage device - the thing you cannot actually do with Apple products. The best variants out now that I can see include Samsung Galaxy S4 or HTC One, depending on what type of display you prefer. However, if you lean towards Apple, HTC One screen will be better for you.

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