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Thread: The volume "Filesystem root" has only 533.9 MB disk space remaining

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Beans
    56

    Question The volume "Filesystem root" has only 533.9 MB disk space remaining

    Greetings,

    After full installation of TeX Live 2013 I am coming across this problem pretty often. I think I need a different mount point for my /usr directory, but I do not know how to proceed. Can you aid me in the process or suggest an alternative remedy?

    Many thanks
    The output of df -i and df -h are as follows:
    ongun@Vesnog:~$ df -i




    Code:
    ongun@Vesnog:~$ df -i
    Filesystem      Inodes  IUsed   IFree IUse% Mounted on
    /dev/sda6       915712 658845  256867   72% /
    udev            206346    568  205778    1% /dev
    tmpfs           210048    506  209542    1% /run
    none            210048      3  210045    1% /run/lock
    none            210048     10  210038    1% /run/shm
    /dev/sda8      2138112  33705 2104407    2% /home
    ongun@Vesnog:~$ df -h
    Filesystem      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
    /dev/sda6        14G   13G  451M  97% /
    udev            2.0G  4.0K  2.0G   1% /dev
    tmpfs           784M  916K  783M   1% /run
    none            5.0M     0  5.0M   0% /run/lock
    none            2.0G  424K  2.0G   1% /run/shm
    /dev/sda8        33G  4.2G   27G  14% /home



    OS: Ubuntu 12.04 LTS 32-bit

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    India
    Beans
    8,175
    Distro
    Ubuntu 12.04 Precise Pangolin

    Re: The volume "Filesystem root" has only 533.9 MB disk space remaining

    Quote Originally Posted by Vesnog View Post
    I think I need a different mount point for my /usr directory, but I do not know how to proceed.
    Disclaimer - I have never done it myself, so try it at your own risk.

    In general - prepare a partition (ext3 or ext4) you want to use as /usr, and copy all the data from your current /usr directory to that new partition. To preserve the properties (permissions, owner/group etc.) of the files, use "rsync -ah" instead of "cp" or copying via GUI. Finally, add a mount-point entry for it in /etc/fstab.

    For example, if you want to use sda7 as /usr, then format it as ext4 and copy the entire /usr directory to it with -
    Code:
    sudo rsync -aH /usr/ <mount point where sda7 is currently mounted>
    Verify afterwards that the destination now contains the contents of /usr, not the "usr" directory itself (with the contents being inside it).

    Then add the following entry in /etc/fstab -
    Code:
    /dev/sda7 /usr               ext4    defaults 0       2
    It is recommended to use the UUID of sda7 instead of "/dev/sda7".

    To be extra safe you should do it all from a Live session (in which case, the above commands and addresses will change relatively), and after having done the above, rename the original /usr directory to, say, "oldusr" and create a fresh, empty "usr" with sudo (because the mount point must exist). Then reboot and if anything goes wrong, just boot into live mode again > delete the empty "usr" > rename the "oldusr" back to "usr" and delete (or comment out) the /etc/fstab entry.

    Having explained that, it recommended for new users to just keep the root (/) partition large enough to accommodate all these parts. Depending upon your partition layout, it may be easier too. If you consider this option, please show us your partition layout with -
    Code:
    sudo parted -l
    Or, if parted is not installed -
    Code:
    sudo fdisk -l
    Varun
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