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Thread: Building computer to play games

  1. #11
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    Oct 2013
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    Re: Building computer to play games

    @whatthefunk As this is my first foray into using a OS based on the linux kernel, I don't know what to expect in terms of gaming experience. I'm keeping an open mind and hoping to learn more about the linux platform in the process. If the gaming experience is disappointing, I'll probably partition the hard drive and mount windows and use it as a game slave. I've heard mixed things about Wine, but I am hopeful that the near future holds many good things for linux gamers as DanglingPointer suggested.

    @Danglingpointer Good to know that there are not many driver and kernel compatibility issues when purchasing hardware! I'm thinking I'll probably just run Ubuntu on a stick just like you. And I'm leaning more towards Asus because their reviews have been generally more favorable than Gigabytes and I read somewhere that Asus is Linux Certified (whatever that means).

    @1s3ct0wn Great suggestions! Many of your picks are choices that I am strongly leaning towards. I do have a question about your storage pics though. I generally keep my files on large external hard drives (mostly movies...everything else I keep on my internal hard drive for quick access). Why would you need more than 1 internal hard drive? I know that access is generally quicker on an internal hard drive. But is there any other added benefit to having 3 internals or is it mainly just the cool factor? Thanks again for giving me your picks! Lots of good ideas...I still have to do some more research on power supply and graphics cards though. But I feel pretty close to making purchases.

    @Arthur_D Thanks for responding. Yeah it seems to be a consensus that there are not many OS/motherboard compatibility issues and I can pick a Mobo based on personal preference. I am probably going to go with some Asus Mobo. I am hearing mixed things on graphics cards, but generally I have heard better things about the GTX780. This might be a totally nooby question for me to ask, but can you install both a GTX780 and AMD graphics card? I know there is some technology that allows for multiple graphics cards, but I don't know if that applies to cards from different manufacturers or if it depends on whether the Mobo offers that feature??

  2. #12
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    Jun 2009
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    Kubuntu 14.04 Trusty Tahr

    Re: Building computer to play games

    Quote Originally Posted by Throbn View Post
    This might be a totally nooby question for me to ask, but can you install both a GTX780 and AMD graphics card? I know there is some technology that allows for multiple graphics cards, but I don't know if that applies to cards from different manufacturers or if it depends on whether the Mobo offers that feature??
    You might technically be able to install two graphics cards from different manufacturers but you can only use one at a time due to drivers.
    For multi-GPU setups, the cards and motherboard needs to support this (and the drivers). NVIDIA cards use SLI, while AMD cards use CrossfireX - so differing technologies, although many (maybe most) motherboards support both. I don't know if any of those work under Linux, but to be honest if you're looking at a 780 or similar you're probably not going to need two of them.
    My intent is not to flame. I am unarmed. -- QIII; thanks!

  3. #13
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    Jul 2013
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    Re: Building computer to play games

    Hello, i'll start off with the PSU and case, it's never bad idea so spend more then needed on PSU because you buy them to last long even for the next build and you make sure it's able to handle SLI/Crossfire in future, same goes with the case. From the information provided in the first post, I had no idea you have large external hard drives, the benefit having 2 Green HDD instead of one is raid and most important if one of the HDD fail only half of your data is lost. Why I decided to go with Nvidia, well that's from personal experience their drivers usually deliver performance same as on Windows.

  4. #14
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    Nov 2012
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    8

  5. #15
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    Oct 2013
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    Re: Building computer to play games

    @ Arthur_D Thanks, I guess that makes sense that you would only be able to use one card at a time because they utilize different drivers. I figured if I got the 780 I would have no need for a second driver, but I was just asking as a hypothetical if there would be any benefit i.e. if they could somehow be used at the same time with SLI/crossfire technology

    @1s3ctown I agree, I've read many people saying similar things about spending a little more for PSU and case to last me for future upgrades with big technological jumps. I guess it just goes to show you what a noob I am that I do not know about RAID, but after doing some research it makes more sense to me why someone would want 2 Green HDD's. But that being said I am building this firstly to play games and secondly to tinker with the computer and learn the linux kernel. So maybe having RAID to protect my files is not that important for someone in my shoes? I don't know.

    @Laurence02 Thanks for giving me your picks! I like a lot of your choices. However your Amazon link to the Gigabyte Mobo has an 1155 socket for the older Sandy Bridge and Ivy Processors. I am almost certainly going for the newer Haswell based processors that utilize 1150 Sockets. But nonetheless I like your choices on the other link. Too bad those prices are not in dollars! Damn American dollar is so weak these days. Haha.

  6. #16
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    Nov 2012
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    Ubuntu Development Release

    Re: Building computer to play games

    I love the AMD APUs, but the driver support is questionable at best. If you do get an APU, get a Radeon graphics card so that you can use the dual graphics feature. If you get a normal CPU, either a Radeon or Nividia video card will work nicley. Try not to get the latest model, though, as there probably isn't support for it yet.

    EDIT: Argh!!! Misread the post. Anyways, ASUS has pretty good motherboards for both AMD and Intel CPU/APUs. Surf NewEgg and see what you find.
    Last edited by King Dude; October 14th, 2013 at 08:17 PM.

  7. #17
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    Oct 2013
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    Re: Building computer to play games

    @Kingdude I'm pretty set on going with an ASUS motherboard, and I've been surfing NewEgg looking at all of their compatible 1150 socket models. It is so difficult to decide which one to pick! I feel like a kid in the candy store. Basically what it comes down to is I can't decide how many PCI express ports I want. I know I need one for the graphics card. Plus I need one or two empty PCI express slots next to the graphics card to allow for good heat dissipation on the graphics card fan. And then I'm trying to decide if I need any remaining PCI express slots for other expansions. A TV tuner card would be veeery cool. I've always thought having a police scanner would be a fun hobby and I just recently learned there may be a market for a scanner card that would allow my computer to act as a radio wave scanner. That would be totally **** to have on my computer with manually adjustable radio frequencies. SSD drives are able to plug in to the PCI express ports but I don't know if it would be worth the extra money to buy a SSD/PCIe over just a regular SSD/SATA? Maybe also a sound card...I don't know whether upgrading a sound card will improve sound quality over the integrated Mobo sound card or if it will just give you additional features.

    Clearly I still have a lot more research to do. Thanks for all of your contributions and posts. As always, any more comments or suggestions are greatly welcomed!

  8. #18
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    Ubuntu 15.04 Vivid Vervet

    Re: Building computer to play games

    Cooler: THIS it's only $35 USD, and does more than enough to keep your CPU nice and cool. Don't spent more than $50 on a CPU cooler when you certainly don't need to. If you plan on overclocking the crap out of it, then start looking into liquid cooling; but the Hyper 212 Plus is more than enough to keep you nice and cool while loading up your CPU with gaming.

    This might be a totally nooby question for me to ask, but can you install both a GTX780 and AMD graphics card?
    Nope; drivers won't play nice. Pick one and stick with it for awhile. It's really preference and taste at that price-point. The differences in performance between a $700 AMD vs. $700 Nvidia card are pretty tough for the naked human eye to spot.

    I've used ASRock, MSI, ASUS all without any real issues (just read up on UEFI, please!). Again more about preference and what kind of history you've had with the brand at that point. Some people swear by one brand when others know its the devil!
    Tantum eruditi sunt liberi.

  9. #19
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    May 2009
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    Terra Australis
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    Ubuntu

    Re: Building computer to play games

    Quote Originally Posted by Throbn View Post
    @Danglingpointer Good to know that there are not many driver and kernel compatibility issues when purchasing hardware! I'm thinking I'll probably just run Ubuntu on a stick just like you. And I'm leaning more towards Asus because their reviews have been generally more favorable than Gigabytes and I read somewhere that Asus is Linux Certified (whatever that means).
    If you do go the USB stick method, make sure to get the best USB 3.0 stick out there. One with a reputation of having a long flash life with good reviews (I'm currently using a Sandisk Extreme USB3 64GB, it only runs the OS). Reason being is that the TRIM functionality doesn't work with USB flash drives.
    Also do not put a swap partition on it. If you will be following my pattern with RAID on the rig and the OS on a stick, allocate a swap somewhere amongst those disks on your rig or run the swap on a small RAID0 (1x to 2x the size of your RAM, up to you. It really depends on what you will be running on the rig. Some people don't even have swap!).
    Also don't forget that it is safer to have a UPS when using RAID to safeguard against power interruptions which could render a RAID0 useless or add errors to RAID5 parities.

    Linux certified means all chips and hardware will run at a minimum linux kernel version level, whatever that version is.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
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    18

    Re: Building computer to play games

    Is there a worry that the Samsung 840 EVO will not be well supported in Ubuntu since it a is a fairly new device? Another post suggests it uses new technology not yet supported in stock Ubuntu:

    http://askubuntu.com/questions/33983...nd-queued-trim

    Not sure if that poses any problem. Would the drive run well without support for SATA 3.1 and "queued TRIM"?

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