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Thread: Restoring a Unix Tar File with Ubuntu

  1. #1
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    Restoring a Unix Tar File with Ubuntu

    I have all of these old DDS3 and DDS4 tapes that I need to restore the files off of. The only information that I really know is that they were put on the tapes about 10 to 20 years ago using Digital Unix. They are in a Tar file format. I have been using Ubuntu 13.04 to try to restore these files but I've had zero success so far. I have really no idea how to get these files off of here. A couple of commands that we've tried in terminal are:


    /media/archive/SCSI/Linux$ sudo dd if=/dev/st0 ibs=128k | tar -vxf -


    sudo tar - xzf /dev/st0 /media/archive/SCSI/Linux



    /media/archive/SCSI/Linux is what I am trying to restore to and st0 is the Tape Drive name


    Please help me out!!
    Thanks
    Last edited by dFWPspP; August 13th, 2013 at 10:30 PM.

  2. #2
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    Re: Restoring a Unix Tar File with Ubuntu

    can you just copy that tar file to /tmp and then extract from there?
    Something like this:
    Code:
    tar xfpvz /tmp/tarfile -C /media/archive/SCSI/Linux/
    Last edited by VMC; August 13th, 2013 at 11:45 PM.
    boot_info_script | AMD64 Athlon X2 Dual-Core - nVidia Geforce 6150 SE - 4GB DDR3

  3. #3
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    Re: Restoring a Unix Tar File with Ubuntu

    The error I got from that is
    tar: pvz: Cannot open: No such file or directory
    tar: Error is not recoverable: exiting now


    Thank you
    Last edited by dFWPspP; August 13th, 2013 at 10:34 PM.

  4. #4
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    Re: Restoring a Unix Tar File with Ubuntu

    I made an error on the code section above, in case you just copy&pasted it. Its corrected now.
    boot_info_script | AMD64 Athlon X2 Dual-Core - nVidia Geforce 6150 SE - 4GB DDR3

  5. #5
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    Re: Restoring a Unix Tar File with Ubuntu

    I didn't just just and paste before, I kinda made my own based off of yours. But when i copy and pasted your modified code the output I got was

    tar (child): /tmp/tarfile: Cannont open: No such file or directory
    tar (child): Error is not recoverable: exiting now
    tar: Child returned status 2
    tar: Error is not recoverable:exiting now


    The funny thing is that when I do write something in terminal sometimes the tape drive will act like its starting up and the terminal response imeadiately responds with whatever error is gives me and then I get a response from the tape drive
    Thanks

  6. #6
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    Re: Restoring a Unix Tar File with Ubuntu

    Did you actually copy the tar file off the device into /tmp?

    I don't have any experience of this, but there are some specific tools for controlling tape devices (mt) and reading from dds devices in particular (dds-dd - in the package dds2tar)

    http://manpages.ubuntu.com/manpages/.../mt-gnu.1.html
    http://manpages.ubuntu.com/manpages/.../dds-dd.1.html

    Hope this helps

  7. #7
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    Ubuntu 12.04 Precise Pangolin

    Re: Restoring a Unix Tar File with Ubuntu

    There are so many things to go wrong when you're trying to extract from a source that you're not sure of. Instead using the 'x' switch, why not use 't' first? That will list the files in the archive.

  8. #8
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    Aug 2013
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    Re: Restoring a Unix Tar File with Ubuntu

    Thanks for all of the suggestions. steeldriver, I looked over those manpages before and they were little help but thank you. And zacktu, I tried with the t and it didn't do anything. If ii run 'mt -f /dev/st0 status' it would show the name and one other name and then it would display 0 for everything else such as files, block #, ect. My internship is done today so this no longer a problem for me. But any other suggestions would still be looked at and I can't guarantee that other guys will try it out. I was starting to think that the tapes might have gone bad seeing that the newest ones are 15 years old. Thanks guys.

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