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Thread: Managing Partitions Safely

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
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    2

    Managing Partitions Safely

    How can I safely partition my disk retaining Windows7 and Ubuntu? I am not sure which one belongs to which. I also had Suse Linux partitions that I don't need anymore. Windows and Ubuntu exists in disk. Suse Linux shows up in Grub with /dev/sda6/ /dev/sd10 and /dev/sd11 and also when I see the disk contents (I don't need it anymore).

    I have Ubuntu cd but not Windows, so I wanted to be careful. I can re install Ubuntu as I only installed 12.04 ISO via USB yesterday. I would like to retain Windows 7 partitions but combine all Linux partitions for Ubuntu (assuming that is the right direction I should think).

    Attached is my GParted. Please note I am a fairly new user when it comes to disk / memory management.
    Last edited by prajagop; August 8th, 2013 at 06:23 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
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    2

    Re: Managing Partitions Safely

    I had copied my image to editor window, but it look scrambled. Apologies to everyone. I am re attaching here.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    China
    Beans
    995
    Distro
    Ubuntu 12.04 Precise Pangolin

    Re: Managing Partitions Safely

    In Windows you could open up the disk management tool delete all the Suse partitions (marked as of unknown type) and then simply install Ubuntu into the free space created.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Chicago Suburbs
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    Hidden!
    Distro
    Ubuntu 14.04 Trusty Tahr

    Re: Managing Partitions Safely

    I would use gparted. Windows does not see Linux partitions, so it may not work correctly on those partitions.
    Generally Linux tools for Linux and Windows tools for Windows, but of course there are exceptions.

    The only issue you now have is sda12, your new / (root) partition is between your NTFS partitions which I expect you want to change. You also have mounted swap with existing boot. But you can delete & recreate swap, but have to edit fstab with new UUID for new swap partition.

    About 20GB for / is not far from what I normally suggest, but then I suggest either a separate /home or (what I use) separate data partition(s). I have both a Linux formatted data partition and still have a NTFS data partition from when I still used XP. Eventually I will finally move all data from NTFS and only have Linux on my system.
    For info on UEFI boot install & repair - Updated Mar 2015:
    http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2147295
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