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Thread: Ubuntu 13.04

  1. #1
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    Oct 2011
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    Ubuntu 13.04

    Hi everyone,

    I'm trying to install Ubuntu 13.04 from my cd. Everything works find to a certain point. Then it just freezes. I do have my ethernet cable inside my computer jack while installing.

    I've heard of it working for people without it being connected.. But i'm wondering if that should even be an issue if it is or isn't?

    I know my computer can handle it otherwise I wouldn't even bother attempting it..

    Anyone have any ideas?

    Thanks,

  2. #2

    Re: Ubuntu 13.04

    I installed 13.04 without a network cable as my port is broken. It realised that I had a wireless connection to use. What about disk space have you got enough of that?
    Noli illegitimi carborundum

  3. #3
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    Oct 2011
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    Re: Ubuntu 13.04

    off the the top of my head I can't remember right now whether I have 1 or 2 TB's.. It's one of those and it's fully empty. It was just meant for ubuntu.. Maybe I'll try it without the ethernet cable when I get home from work later and see if it helps.

  4. #4

    Re: Ubuntu 13.04

    Quote Originally Posted by d1lu5ion View Post
    off the the top of my head I can't remember right now whether I have 1 or 2 TB's.. It's one of those and it's fully empty. It was just meant for ubuntu.. Maybe I'll try it without the ethernet cable when I get home from work later and see if it helps.
    probably not that then. I only mentioned as the only time an install has stalled on me is when I didn't quite have the specs for it.
    Noli illegitimi carborundum

  5. #5
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    Re: Ubuntu 13.04

    Quote Originally Posted by d1lu5ion View Post
    I'm trying to install Ubuntu 13.04 from my cd. Everything works find to a certain point. Then it just freezes.
    First of all, Welcome to the forums d1lu5ion !

    Does the live session work fine (not "Install", just "Try" on the live session)?

    If not, try the various boot options available for the live session : https://help.ubuntu.com/community/BootOptions

    If it works fine in live mode and only installation is problematic, then yes, try disconnecting from net when trying to install. It is not necessarily a problem, not even a common one, but IS one of a few other possible reasons.

    PS:
    If you are new to Ubuntu, I'd suggest to try 12.04 as well, in live session of course, and go with it if it plays nicely with your system. The reason is that it is an LTS - means Long-Term-Support version. It is 'supposed' to be more stable and will be supported till April 2017, while 13.04 will only be supported till January next year (afterwards it'll keep working, but you won't get software or security updates for it).
    Varun
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  6. #6
    Join Date
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    Ubuntu 12.04 Precise Pangolin

    Re: Ubuntu 13.04

    If it always gets to a certain point in the install before "freezing", it sounds like it may be a bad disc.

    Try re-burning the disc at 8x, or as close to that speed as you can manage. Let the disc cool down outside the computer before putting it into the drive and booting from it.

    If you still have problems, check the MD5 hash of the ISO file you downloaded, and see if it matches the MD5 hash published on the Ubuntu website.
    I try to treat the cause, not the symptom. I avoid the terminal in instructions, unless it's easier or necessary. My instructions will work within the Ubuntu system, instead of breaking or subverting it. Those are the three guarantees to the helpee.

  7. #7
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    Re: Ubuntu 13.04

    Thanks Guys, I will have to give this a try and report back later. I appreciate all the advice!


    First of all, Welcome to the forums d1lu5ion !

    Does the live session work fine (not "Install", just "Try" on the live session)?

    If not, try the various boot options available for the live session : https://help.ubuntu.com/community/BootOptions

    If it works fine in live mode and only installation is problematic, then yes, try disconnecting from net when trying to install. It is not necessarily a problem, not even a common one, but IS one of a few other possible reasons.

    PS:
    If you are new to Ubuntu, I'd suggest to try 12.04 as well, in live session of course, and go with it if it plays nicely with your system. The reason is that it is an LTS - means Long-Term-Support version. It is 'supposed' to be more stable and will be supported till April 2017, while 13.04 will only be supported till January next year (afterwards it'll keep working, but you won't get software or security updates for it).

    Thank you for the welcoming.

    So are you mentioning that 12.04 is generally the best way to go? I'm sorta new to the server stuff so I'm trying to learn as much as I can.

  8. #8
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    Re: Ubuntu 13.04

    Quote Originally Posted by d1lu5ion View Post
    So are you mentioning that 12.04 is generally the best way to go?
    'Generally', not necessarily. But if you are going to try the server, then it is even more recommendable since for a server, stability and long term support are preferable over cutting-edge features.

    For desktop version, go with whatever suits you best, I just highlighted the difference.

    Some people prefer newer and more advanced features over 'supposed' (but not guaranteed) stability and long-term support. For some others, it is a matter of better hardware support (one may support better that the other one). But for majority of newcomers, it is either the lack of information, or the false assumption that "latest must be greatest", or both that make them go with the latest release instead of the latest LTS. So I just made that information available to you. Try them both if you wish or if needed, then go with whatever looks better to 'you'.
    Varun
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  9. #9
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    Re: Ubuntu 13.04

    'Generally', not necessarily. But if you are going to try the server, then it is even more recommendable since for a server, stability and long term support are preferable over cutting-edge features.

    For desktop version, go with whatever suits you best, I just highlighted the difference.

    Some people prefer newer and more advanced features over 'supposed' (but not guaranteed) stability and long-term support. For some others, it is a matter of better hardware support (one may support better that the other one). But for majority of newcomers, it is either the lack of information, or the false assumption that "latest must be greatest", or both that make them go with the latest release instead of the latest LTS. So I just made that information available to you. Try them both if you wish or if needed, then go with whatever looks better to 'you'.
    Ah I see, Thank you. You are right, I think the only way to get a feel of it, is to try them both and see what I like or suits me best.. However, I do like the sound of 12.04 being supported until April 2017!

    Why is 13 only supported for a shorter period of time? -- That's probably the lamest question...

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    Re: Ubuntu 13.04

    Quote Originally Posted by d1lu5ion View Post
    Why is 13 only supported for a shorter period of time? -- That's probably the lamest question...
    Nope! That's a valid and important question. Although what I'll tell you is not an official answer, just my personal knowledge and opinion about it

    Also, I have a very bad habit of pouring everything I know if a poor innocent user makes the mistake of expressing curiosity about something I know (or I believe I know). So get prepared to suffer the punishment below -

    LTS (Long Term Support) Release

    Think of an LTS, like 12.04 as an enterprise release. It is supposed to be stable and supported for a long time, while containing everything that can be offered without compromising the stability. It comes out with only those features that have been tested thoroughly and are supposed to be bug-free, stable and working for most, if not all, users.

    Further, its updates (the default, recommended ones) contain only those things that have also been tested enough and are supposed to be stable. Of course no software is 100% bug free and this is especially true in active Open-Source projects like Ubuntu. So despite a lot of care, bugs do keep appearing from time-to-time, but a lot less in numbers in an LTS, and (I assume) are paid more attention thus getting fixed relatively quicker.

    It is released every 2 years in April (thus always a ".04" version like 12.04, 10.04, 8.04...). Before 12.04, only the server version of the LTS was supported for 5 years, while the desktop for only 3 years. From 12.04 (and onwards), it was decided that both desktop and server versions will be supported for 5 years.

    There are also "Point-releases" of LTS versions, which are nothing but a release of LTS including the latest official updates (including newer kernel and software packages that have been officially released in its updates). These are represented by an additional number in the last (.1, .2, etc.), like the current "Point-Release" of 12.04 LTS is 12.04.2.

    It means that when you install a point release (the default ISO available at official download links), you are getting a version that already contains the updates that have been released since the original release till the date of the release of that Point-Release.

    The next LTS will be 14.04, releasing in April 2014.


    Standard Release

    Think of them as relatively more liberal, more trendy, sort of 'Enthusiast' releases (my personal views, hope I'm not offending anyone). It contains features and support that could not be included in the LTS because of some reasons. Some of these reasons can be -

    * Maybe the feature/suport was not ready at the time of the release of the LTS

    * Maybe it wasn't tested enough

    * Maybe it was too buggy

    * Maybe there were questions about its usability or whether the users would like it or not...

    These "Standard Releases" serve two main purposes -

    1) For users it serves as a release that lets them enjoy the latest, latest trends and cutting edge features/technology.

    2) For developers it serves the purpose of extensive mass-testing of features that they intend to include in the next LTS.

    The standard releases are released every 6 months (in April and October every year, thus the version numbers always being ".04" and ".10"). Before 13.04, the standard releases were supported for 18 months. Which meant there used to be times when the developers had to support 10-11 different versions simultaneously (for example, in April 2010). With the decision to extend the desktop LTS support to 5 years like the server version, this was going to get worse. This brings us to the answer to your original question -


    Why is Standard Release Support Period is Short ?

    Supporting a release means keeping it up-to-date with latest security patches, latest bug-fixes, updating hardware-support, etc. and doing all this while trying not to break an existing feature/package. This requires a lot of care and work from the developers. Since supporting the LTS is a serious commitment, it is difficult for the developers to support multiple distros simultaneously.

    From 12.04, Canonical decided to get more aggressive on development front, while also hardening stability on the LTS front. So it shortened the support period of the Standard Release to just 9 months. With this change, now there will be at most 8 different versions to support at a given time (including server versions).
    (just calculated, can be wrong)

    Keeping the "Standard Release" support period short allows the developers to move on to a newer release that contains most of the features that were tested ok in the previous one, replacing or dropping altogether the features that were too problematic, and include the latest ones on a whole new build. Thus -

    * The developers don't have to carry the burden of supporting too many different versions with the same purpose. Features that have been proven stable and useful can be moved to the existing LTS in the form of updates, or marked for inclusion in the next LTS.

    * They can keep testing the existing not-yet-stable-enough and newer features in the next Standard Release.

    * The users who like to enjoy the latest features can move on to the next release (be it LTS or a standard one, whatever is latest)

    * The users who prefer stability can stick with the LTS, until the next one comes out.

    That's all of my personal understanding of the reasons why the standard releases have a short support duration (of course based on many articles/discussions I have read, but can't call them as 'Authoritative' statements).

    Some useful links elaborating these facts/differences :

    What Is an LTS : https://wiki.ubuntu.com/LTS

    Table of Most Recent Releases and Their Support Period : https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Releases

    Difference between LTS and Standard Releases (much less painful post than this one) : http://askubuntu.com/q/16366
    Last edited by varunendra; June 26th, 2013 at 07:13 AM. Reason: typo
    Varun
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