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Thread: Building Your Own Distro

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
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    78

    Re: Building Your Own Distro

    Quote Originally Posted by tartalo View Post
    If you want Unity you should use Ubuntu. Unity has not been designed with portability in mind and although there are some experimental ports for Fedora, OpenSuse and Arch, one shouldn't expect them to work flawlessly.
    Didn't know that, that's something I really enjoy.

    However, you can achieve something similar to Unity's dash -not equal- using KDE + Homerun, this will work in any Linux distribution, and if all you want is a dock, well, there are tons of options.
    I run a cairo dock on my Lubuntu 13.04 netbook, which is where I got the idea.

    In my opinion Arch is the way to go if you want the very latest versions of the programs, that is the strongest point of Arch.

    Arch is indeed very configurable, but that is also true for all general Linux distributions, including Ubuntu (At least until it migrates to Mir, then things might change). If you want to build a system to suit your needs Arch is not the only choice, although their Wiki certainly helps when you take this route, I find it easier to follow the instructions in the Arch Wiki than the Debian documentation, for example.
    Is there an easier to read ubuntu doc? Maybe I could just modify my current distro

    It's true that you are a bit "on your own" with Arch, or better said, you are expected to investigate about your problem and try to fix it on your own before you ask for help, and when you do you are expected to give valuable information. This is not exclusive from Arch, you'll get the same recommendation in most other Linux forums.

    Will you have the same packages in Arch? Not all of them, some things are exclusive to Ubuntu, in Arch you'll get no purchase recommendations from Amazon when you search your private documents, and there's no Ubuntu software center, but you can install easily Steam and you graphic cards closed source driver... you should have a look at the packages available in Arch and AUR to see if everything you expect is there.
    Mentioned earlier, LFS, is this similar to what you're talking about above? If not, why?

    Should you bother with Arch? Arch it's not for newbies, but an intermediate user willing to learn more about Linux and take control of the computer should give it a try at least.
    I definitely want to try!

    I'd recommend to start with a Virtual Machine, like VirtualBox.
    I tried Wine once and was less than impressed. Is there a better way to go about it?

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    301
    Distro
    Ubuntu 6.10 Edgy

    Re: Building Your Own Distro

    Quote Originally Posted by Myst1234 View Post
    Is there an easier to read ubuntu doc? Maybe I could just modify my current distro
    There's an Ubuntu wiki (but I started using the Arch wiki to solve my doubts even before using Arch Linux, a matter of taste I guess.)

    Mentioned earlier, LFS, is this similar to what you're talking about above? If not, why?
    No, Arch is more similar to Ubuntu than to LSF, it's a distribution, it has precompiled packages and tries to save work to the user, although it has a different kind of user in mind.

    I tried Wine once and was less than impressed. Is there a better way to go about it?
    Wine? Did you mean VirtualBox? There are alternatives like qemu, kvm... but virtualbox is the easiest option in my opinion.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
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    ZZ9 Plural Z Alpha
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    Distro
    Ubuntu

    Re: Building Your Own Distro

    LFS is totally from scratch. You need to compile a toolchain including binutils, coreutils, gcc and the Linux headers, then you need to compile another toolchain compiled against the existing toolchain, then you can start compiling the actual system.
    My LFS build took a week and I probably have about 25-30 hours invested in it. It is not for complete tyros; familiarity with the command line and with basic compiling using gcc is essential.
    I would download VirtualBox and build Arch in it, if you are interested. Do be aware that the Arch community does not suffer fools (people who don't bother reading the documentation and simply post a whiny demand for help) gladly. You should consider yourself as being on your own as far as researching errors and implementing fixes.
    Both can be a great learning experience. Good luck.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
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    27

    Re: Building Your Own Distro

    Quote Originally Posted by Myst1234 View Post
    this sounds like a much better place to start! thank you! Would I be able to stay close to ubuntu which is what I'm familiar with?
    I just want to gear the system more towards what I use it for, minus all the extra crap I never use
    For what you want, you may want to consider a command-line install of ubuntu. It will give you a bare bones install with whatever desktop environment you choose. Then you can install only the apps you want, and it will be very fast. And it will allow you to stay within the friendly confines of ubuntu. https://help.ubuntu.com/community/In...wMemorySystems

    I'm not trying to steer you away from any other methods, but be prepared to put a ton of work into something like linux from scratch. On the other hand, a command line install of ubuntu is relatively easy.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
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    Ubuntu Development Release

    Re: Building Your Own Distro

    Quote Originally Posted by Sam Mills View Post
    For what you want, you may want to consider a command-line install of Ubuntu.
    +1

    If you want something that uses all of the Ubuntu repositories and package management software and uses the Unity interface then stick with Ubuntu.

    Do your initial installation using either the Mini CD or the server CD to get a command line only install, and then just install the packages you want and nothing else.
    For example running the command...
    Code:
    sudo apt-get install --no-install-recommends ubuntu-desktop
    will install the Unity desktop, but won't install any of the applications that come as standard with a normal Ubuntu installation.
    This will give you the smallest possible base OS to which you can add your favoured applications.
    Cheesemill

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
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    Hidden!
    Distro
    Kubuntu 14.04 Trusty Tahr

    Re: Building Your Own Distro

    another nice how to for minimal install: http://www.psychocats.net/ubuntu/minimal

    i think this would be enough for what you want to do/have. you can do simialr with debian netinstall if you want to have even less stuff installed on start. then you just add the packages you want to add. see f it all works ok and then use remasytersys now called system imaging:
    http://www.remastersys.com/
    http://system-imaging.blogspot.com/

    which will create your very own distribution (based on debian/ubuntu) iso image you can then share with others or keep for yourself.
    Easy to understand Ubuntu manual with lots of pics: http://ubuntu-manual.org/
    Do i need antivirus/firewall in linux?
    User friendly disk backup: Redobackup

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
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    78

    Re: Building Your Own Distro

    Lots of stuff to read, thanks guys!

    Seems like a command line ubuntu would be what I'm looking for. Am I going to need an install package or cd? I originally got linux ubuntu on this computer from a thumb drive.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
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    Distro
    Ubuntu Development Release

    Re: Building Your Own Distro

    You can use either a CD or a USB stick to install a minimal Ubuntu.

    As for which image to download you have 2 options, either go for the server CD or the mini CD. You end up with the same minimal system no matter which one you use, the only difference is that the server CD contains all of the packages needed to install whereas the mini CD downloads all of the packages you need to install from the internet during installation. The upshot of this is that using the mini CD means that your system is fully up to date from the start, whereas the server CD installation will need updating.

    The server CD images can all be found at http://releases.ubuntu.com/ and the mini CD images can be found at http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/netboot/ (you're looking for the mini.iso file).
    Cheesemill

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
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    78

    Re: Building Your Own Distro

    Well I've started my build. 2 things though....

    1. I cannot seem to get wireless working at all. Any tips for me there?

    2. I think I accidentally partitioned the system to run off the thumb drive. When I boot without it, the computer does not go past the blank screen with a flashing cursor. Can I fix this manually? Or do I need to reinstall and be more mindful of the partitioning?

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Beans
    78

    Re: Building Your Own Distro

    Seems like I'm working out my wireless issue by following a couple different guides out there. Not sure if I'm able to make it permanent through any of these though. That's my concern so far with wireless.

    EDIT:: Still finding it hard to get a network and connect to it.

    The partitioning is still in the front of my mind as a problem though.
    Last edited by Myst1234; May 31st, 2013 at 02:07 AM.

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