Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: Resources for disabled users looking for accessible hardware?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Beans
    278

    Resources for disabled users looking for accessible hardware?

    How do you find good accessible hardware?

    A lot of the discussion here is about how to find the right software and the right software fixes to work with the hardware. And that is important. But it isn't always enough. I have sensory issues, and I had a Toshiba a few years ago which I had to trade in. The minimum brightness setting was too bright for me too look at, even wearing sunglasses, without hurting my eyes. The constant processor noise gave me nasty headaches. I don't think any software fixes can fix these hardware design bugs.

    Can anyone point to resources which help disabled users find accessible hardware?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Beans
    453
    Distro
    Ubuntu Studio 12.04 Precise Pangolin

    Re: Resources for disabled users looking for accessible hardware?

    Quote Originally Posted by MarjaE View Post
    How do you find good accessible hardware?
    This is where you go to a local white box maker, and clearly explain your needs and requirements.

    The first major downside is that the specs you give require hardware that is, to put it mildly, very expensive.
    The second major downside is that the resulting hardware won't be funded by the local (private/city/county/state/federal) agency that helps disabled people.

    ###

    Something to consider:
    • For the brightness issue:
      • Only use software that runs from the command line;
      • Learn Grade 2 Braille;
      • Use a Braille Display Monitor;
      • Do not hook a "regular" monitor up to your computer;
    • For the noise issue:
      • Only use tower systems;
      • Put the tower into a box that allows air to flow through, but prevents sound from escaping;
      • Never use a laptop;




    jonathon
    And now I bend the knee of my heart,
    Imploring you for your kindness.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Beans
    278

    Re: Resources for disabled users looking for accessible hardware?

    Quote Originally Posted by jonathonblake View Post
    This is where you go to a local white box maker, and clearly explain your needs and requirements.

    The first major downside is that the specs you give require hardware that is, to put it mildly, very expensive.
    The second major downside is that the resulting hardware won't be funded by the local (private/city/county/state/federal) agency that helps disabled people.

    ###

    Something to consider:
    • For the brightness issue:

      • Only use software that runs from the command line;
      • Learn Grade 2 Braille;
      • Use a Braille Display Monitor;
      • Do not hook a "regular" monitor up to your computer;

    • For the noise issue:

      • Only use tower systems;
      • Put the tower into a box that allows air to flow through, but prevents sound from escaping;
      • Never use a laptop;





    jonathon
    What is a white box maker?

    Also being disabled often means being broke. Most of us need something cheap and reliable.

    I work with graphics, I have language issues that make it hard to use the command line, and coordination issues that make it hard to avoid hitting the wrong damn key. All the necessary hardware for me exists, and probably for many other users with disabilities, for example, many monitors be set to low brightness, many computers don't make too much processor noise, etc. but it isn't easy to find out which computers work with which needs, and I suspect this is an issue for other users with their own disabilities.

    Places which discuss minimizing noise admit they don't worry about ultrasound or about constant sounds, because most people filter out constant sounds, but some sensory defensive people don't; this is an issue for me because I was struggling with constant processor noise most people couldn't hear; when I brought that computer in for repairs the second time one of the techs used an audiometer and confirmed it at something like 22kHz.

    Places which discuss ergonomic keyboards usually assume all users are typing with both hands. I'm lucky enough to have substantial use of each hand, and I used to be able to type with either hand, but I have never been able to type with both hands at once. I also have trouble with pencil grips and the like. If it's small enough and well-enough designed, a basic keyboard doesn't put too much strain on my typing hand, but small enough keyboards aren't all well-enough-designed, and may require Windows-only or Mac-only software and some Danish king to connect.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •