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Thread: Which way to go?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2013
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    3

    Question Which way to go?

    Hi Folks,
    My name should be self explanatory. I probably should not even be on this forum as I have yet to even try Ubuntu . I want to try it, I think it sounds like a neat OS. I see a lot of laptops on eBay without operating systems, and I wonder how in the world they got rid of them, and why. I have a sneaky suspicion that they were Windows something or another and they used the COA number to sell another computer with that number. I saw that Ubuntu was free, and thought it sounded like a neat thing to try, and I saw the colors on the screen of this beautiful looking operating system (that is important to me ) so I thought I would do a little research and check it out. Can I buy a laptop without an operating system installed and successfully push one of the F buttons on reboot to put in a cd and install Ubuntu without having to know a lot about computers? I don't want a password. Will it let me go without? We do not have a password for our wireless internet here at home. If I install Ubuntu will it insist I use passwords for everything? I just want to get the thing installed, go to the internet connections, and push connect, and be in business. If that is not really possible, maybe I should just buy a computer with windows something or another and live with it. I just think they have a corner on the market and do not understand why if Ubuntu and Linux are free, beautiful and useful OS's why the schools , libraries, and other places that need lots of computers don't use this system. Kids in school just get used to what they are taught, I see no reason why schools and libraries need to use Windows that cost a fortune. I am simply confused about that. So I wondered if I can install things on this system that will let me watch videos, it could not possibly do a worse job than my windows xp on that. It is soooo frustrating. Stop and start and stop..... you get the picture I have tried updating , but maybe my computer is too old it is a 2003 dell desktop. Thanks for reading if you got this far, hope you can inform me of what I need to know, thanks !

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
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    Mystletainn Kick!
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    Distro
    Ubuntu 12.04 Precise Pangolin

    Re: Which way to go?

    No operating system just means that the hard drive was wiped, or there is no hard drive.
    And yes, you can get a computer without an operating system, Most of the big name pc companies do this.
    Look for barebones pcs.

    As far as installing Ubuntu to a new system, just go to the ubuntu website and look over their guidance on how to do this.
    http://www.ubuntu.com/download/deskt...g-term-support

    The link is for 12.04LTS, which I would recommend over 13.04, as it is a long term support version and 13.04 is supported for only nine months. Plus 12.04 has been around a year longer so stablity is probably better.

    Any problems, start a thread here.
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
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    317
    Distro
    Ubuntu 12.04 Precise Pangolin

    Re: Which way to go?

    Hi,

    Of course you can! As long as its disc drive is not broken and the person who sold the labtop did not remove the HDD then it will work. There is also the way of installation via a USB stick, too, which is easier I think and can be deleted for another distro or for file usage again. And no, you can set it up to automatically log you in without a password during the installation of Ubuntu. And if your wifi doesn't have a password (why not, by the way?) then all you have to do is select your wifi signal and connect to it.

    As for your computer, it is pretty old, so it will be pretty limited besides basic internet, music watching and light dvd watching. Do you have a GPU in your desktop, and how much ram do you have? What kind of things were you hoping to do with your computer?

    Also, would you like a link to a guide explaining how to install Ubuntu 12.04.2?

    edit

    Oops, was two minutes too late!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2013
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    25

    Re: Which way to go?

    Of course you can you can download Ubuntu ISO , burn that boy ( i mean iso) and install it ...
    actually this is the biggest problem with open source community is most of the vendors don't ship machines with pre-installed linux distros.

    trust me installation is very very very easy you can search over youtube about how to install Ubuntu and learn it and or forum also got tutorials if u r read and do guy.
    what windows have , Linux community it have better. so you don't need to worry about that we got video players (VLC and stuff) , Office , games .. even , if you want to run windows application under linux , we also got solution for that you can install "wine" and use most of the windows applications including most of the games , Steam also supports Ubuntu Js....

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    457

    Re: Which way to go?

    no pc geek,
    may I suggest you start with the SwitchingToUbuntu/FromWindows guide https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Sw...tu/FromWindows
    followed by the 12.04 lts release notes https://wiki.ubuntu.com/PrecisePango.../UbuntuDesktop, taken together these two links should give you an idea of what to expect if you decide to move to Ubuntu.

    Good luck.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
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    Magic City of the Plains
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    Hidden!
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    Ubuntu Development Release

    Re: Which way to go?

    If your computer's from 2003, you might want to look at Lubuntu instead of regular Ubuntu.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    Texas
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    14,690
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    Ubuntu 12.04 Precise Pangolin

    Re: Which way to go?

    You can set ubuntu to log in automatically but you still have to create an user password if you do not or you remove it later you will not be able to install software of any kind.
    Thanks

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    52° N 6° E
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    Xubuntu 14.04 Trusty Tahr

    Re: Which way to go?

    You're welcome here as soon as you consider using Ubuntu, so: Welcome!

    I wonder too why schools etc. don't use Linux (most of them at least), but think of the One laptop per child project: those people wanted to put Linux on those machines, but then Microsoft said they would make a special optimised (read: stripped down) version of Windows for this project and supply it for free. For some reason the people behind the project accepted. I call it a nasty way of attracting and binding new customers.

    To come to the point: Ubuntu will insist on a password. You can switch it off for login, but for installing software you will need it. The good thing is, this is one of the reasons why you don't have to be afraid of malware on your computer. Ubuntu means no virus scanner required for most users, which should already outweigh the trouble of typing a password once in a while.

    In most cases you can just put the disk in the tray, boot the computer and let it install. Some types of hardware may give trouble. If you post the specs of the laptop you consider buying we may be able to tell you whether you can expect difficulties and how to solve them.

    Concerning not using a password for wireless network at home: you're free to do so, but there are a few reasons to use a password. Without password anyone within 40m of your home, like your neighbour (if you live in a town) or somebody in a car parked nearby, may be able to get on your network. They can circumvent the firewall in your router and gain easier access to your computer, eavesdrop on your internet usage and hitchhike along on your connection, not only slowing it down but also using your identity. Not a nice idea if that neighbour is doing something illegal.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
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    181

    Re: Which way to go?

    While Ubuntu has progressed to include GUI for many tools, do remember that command line interface using terminal is the way Linux used to be. Some of the best software are still using terminal input (no clicking, just typing). And to fix some of the trouble that may rise up when you mess things, you need to use terminal. Its not hard at all when you get used to it. While Ubuntu is the main OS, there is also Xubuntu, Lubuntu and Kubuntu, they run faster because they don't have much eye candy. In any case, you still need a working PC to download the ISO and burn it to CD or DVD (some of the ISO no longer fits in CD), or 'burn' it into USB drive. If you're thinking of picking up a laptop, get the laptop model number and see whether it supports Ubuntu or not. Try googling the model number and Ubuntu.

    After you install the OS itself, you need to install the media pack as well, its not included by default due to 'legal situation'. Watching DVD in Linux is illegal without the use of 'legalised software' (you need to pay). You watch it free using 'illegal' (according to US Law) method though.

    Well, not all laptop comes with cd/dvd rom this days (especially the small size ones), but if they do, they usually are set to boot from CD if no OS is found in the harddisk. If not, you need to configure the BIOS yourself.

    I do think that you can request the COA from the manufacturer itself if you didnt found one under the laptop.

    Really, no password in your Wi-Fi? I would have tapped into your wireless if I was your neighbour. Who knows if half of your bill/bandwidth are not your family's. Don't you know if someone watched child porn using your house wireless, the police, actually the FBI might storm your house and confiscate all your computer to search for evidence? It has happened several times before, and its not pleasant at all. Its still your choice though.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    Ubuntu 13.10 Saucy Salamander

    Re: Which way to go?

    I'm afraid that this will seem like I'm raining on the parade, but a certain measure of realism should accompany the encouragement you are getting to try Ubuntu out. I am particularly concerned about your insistence that there be no passwords. If you are set on this point, then I honestly think that sticking with Windows is your best bet. I admit that one reason I suggest this is purely selfish. I don't want Linux to get as lousy as Windows on the security front. It's bad for the reputation of Linux and bad for computer users in general when unsecured computers get owned by malware and become another drone in the spambot army. Right now, almost all of the millions of spambots out there are infected Windows computers. By crippling Linux security (and that is what you are doing when you disable passwords), it will only be a matter of time before you also get owned.

    However, my selfish reason is secondary to the primary reason I would advise you against Linux. And that primary reason is this: if the simple safety procedure of a password challenge is enough to turn you off, then dealing with Linux file permissions, command lines, ownerships and the concept of users/groups will have you throwing your computer out the window.

    The people on this forum are almost all Linux enthusiasts, myself included, and we want Linux to grow. But it is important to tell you the cold sobering facts: the superior qualities of Linux come at a cost. It requires a completely different mindset from its users and a willingness to learn and adopt its better security practices. I've been either dabbling in or using Linux in various forms for over 15 years, and have helped many friends and family transition from Windows. I have noted that the only time such transitions work is if the user is prepared to leave their awful Windows habits, mindsets and expectations behind, adopt disciplines that they're not used to (perhaps for the first time in their lives) and commit to a pretty radical psychological transition from Windows to something entirely different. As much as we may tell you that passwords can be disabled (they can), you will find that there are so many other built-in restrictions and safeguards that you will go crazy unless you come into Linux with the proper mindset and expectations. This mindset is the opposite of crippling password authentication.

    If you expect Linux to be just a better Windows, then you are guaranteed to be disappointed and are better off not starting, as it will invariably prove to be nothing but a waste of your time.

    If, despite my warning, you are still curious, then I strongly urge you to read the following:

    "Linux is not Windows" intro:

    http://linux.oneandoneis2.org/LNW.htm

    Psychocat's intro to Ubuntu:

    http://www.psychocats.net/ubuntu/index

    <edit>

    Because you are asking about crippling password challenges, I would also recommend this:

    https://wiki.ubuntu.com/BasicSecurity

    </edit>
    Last edited by DuckHook; May 9th, 2013 at 05:24 AM. Reason: Added link
    Newb: How far must I jump to clear the ledge halfway down?
    Guru: It's bad to jump off cliffs. Let's look at better options.
    Newb: Stop harping about "best practices" and just tell me.


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