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Thread: Ubuntu to halve support length for non-LTS releases

  1. #41
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    Re: Ubuntu to halve support length for non-LTS releases

    Thanks for all that information, Elfy. It seems mostly commonsense.

    I know that the team needs help with triaging. Unfortunately, I'm not in a position to help with that right now.
    Problems with WINE?
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  2. #42
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    Re: Ubuntu to halve support length for non-LTS releases

    Quote Originally Posted by Elfy View Post
    https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+s...ls/+bug/511988 bug in Lucid, which is supported - but I'd question anything being done with it or it being counted - give it 6 weeks and it's not be supported

    https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+s...nux/+bug/35000 bug in Dapper - which appears to be live still. Marked as a duplicate, which received a fix - but is this but itself counted.

    If I remember when I'm somewhere that it'd be useful to ask I will

    Edit -

    I did

    "I believe it's only the open actve bugs, remember things can expire.. and I'm not sure what they do with bugs that are open after EOL for releases"

    at which point someone else joined in

    "most bugs expire if it's set to expire on a project, Ubuntu ones and LP ones dor for exxample, but some people who have their projects on there don't have expiring bugs"

    I'm not sure that set of stats mean very much to be honest.
    Active bugs become inactive after you have waited for too long so the releases they were originally reported on expire. It just means that bugs are not fixed in a timely fashion and eventually become irrelevant, it is not a good thing if releases have a lot of outstanding bugs and the fact that eventually they will go away when the release expire is like sweeping garbage under the rug IMO.
    Last edited by monkeybrain2012; April 2nd, 2013 at 06:17 PM.

  3. #43
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    Re: Ubuntu to halve support length for non-LTS releases

    Quote Originally Posted by monkeybrain2012 View Post
    Really? I am typing on Debian Whizzy now. It is a pain to have to compile updated versions of something simple like Smplayer (say with Youtube support) at every turn and this is not even Lenny! I am not afraid of compiling but just saying, I have better things to do than to compile many apps just to be reasonably up to date. Next thing: to get Firefox and get rid of icewesel.

    I would rather take some risks (and I doubt that it would be more risky than running Fedora, which I also like) than be stuck with Debian "stability" (It can be worse, like Cenos, which is good for servers but not on the desktop especially if you need anything remotely workable in terms of multimedia). I am not an "entreprise" and I am not running a server, I like to get new features and bug fixes rather than something "stable" in the sense of predictably broken or predictably limited.
    Such stable platforms are not indented for home users - requested support times for enterprise system is more as 5+ years. RH offer 10 + 3 years ELP. If you need more up to date Debian you should use Debian Sid.

  4. #44
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    Re: Ubuntu to halve support length for non-LTS releases

    Quote Originally Posted by Gyokuro View Post
    Such stable platforms are not indented for home users - requested support times for enterprise system is more as 5+ years. RH offer 10 + 3 years ELP. If you need more up to date Debian you should use Debian Sid.
    Well I don't really see the advantage of Debian Sid. Why not just use Ubuntu??

    I have been playing with Sid on a spared harddrive for more than a week now. It is less up to date than Ubuntu + ppas and a lot more buggy and unstable, it was a pain to get wifi working (Ubuntu works out of the box with my wifi card but not Debian, have to install some modules but how to do it without wifi? I don't have ethernet so have to use a usb wifi card which just happens to be laying around) Still no youtube player for Smplayer, updating ffmpeg from wheezy to sid removed all my libvaxxxx-extra files and replaced with the crippled ones without extras so conversions to some formats with ffmpeg don't work anymore (so it looks like I need to compile ffmpeg) Kernels were installed without headers and trying to upgrade kernel would remove the old one (so no option to log into the previous kernel if the new one doesn't work) Also Iceweasel is not the same as Firefox, some plugins wouldn't work, can't access some sites which told me I need an updated version of Firefox. Of course I can install Firefox from Mozilla but updating is tedious..

    I can manage all this with some time, but why should I?
    Last edited by monkeybrain2012; April 7th, 2013 at 10:51 PM.

  5. #45
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    Re: Ubuntu to halve support length for non-LTS releases

    Quote Originally Posted by kungfupete View Post
    Agree with monkeybrain & snowpine: While I love Debian, and most Debian based distros, as I get older the challenge of beating a distro into submission to work on my hardware just doesn't have the allure anymore. While I still love experimenting with various thing (such as ACLs & LXC more recently), the time spent trying to get wireless, multiple displays, printers, multimedia support, special keyboard buttons, fonts, etc is just not that fun anymore (although not sure it ever was).

    I have a several (I'm embarrassed to say how many) computers in my house, and one distro has consistently worked out of the box on nearly everything: Ubuntu. No doubt Linut Mint would be the same.

    Ahhh Gentoo....how I don't miss thee!
    Man I never would have agreed with something like this in college. I still like to tinker (good thing we can set up mulltiple partitions and oh grub how I love thee!) but for my main partition? I want stability. I think Ubuntu has the right idea though with the mix of LTSes and six month refreshes. That way they can sort of cater to both crowds.

    9 mos is fine I think. Maybe it will throw newbies off that their new OS is now no longer supported but for people who have been around the block awhile...how long do they actually keep their non LTS releases?
    We're alike, me and cat. A couple of poor nameless slobs. -- Holly Golightly

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