Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 37

Thread: Docks are Old.

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Beans
    15

    Re: Docks are Old.

    Quote Originally Posted by lykwydchykyn View Post
    Eventually, many of us get to a point where we realize that having a desktop that looks cool or works great for the average user is not nearly as compelling as having a desktop that is optimally efficient for what we personally do with it. That's the point where you dump Unity, GNOME, KDE, etc and switch to something like openbox, awesome, or Xmonad and hack it into something that is completely frictionless to you but incomprehensible to anyone else.
    Good stuff. I switched from using cario-dock several months ago, and now I use fluxbox. I have a drop down terminal called Guake that I use for almost everything (except starting firefox) and added to my ~/.bash_aliases. "Eye Candy" uses up no cpu/ram now, I remember how to launch everything from the command line, and I haven't used a graphical file manager in weeks. Is it for everyone? No, I find it efficient, others find it inpenetrable; most people will still want a dock and assorted eye candy, I don't. But to each their own.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Beans
    1,912
    Distro
    Ubuntu

    Re: Docks are Old.

    Quote Originally Posted by lykwydchykyn View Post
    It's a fairly objective thing. If it takes less time and uses less computing resources, it's more efficient. Is there another definition out there we can be subjective about?
    Except in marginal instances, "computing resources" are of little consequence. If resources are adequate for a task, that's all that counts. There is no reward for "saving" resources that would not otherwise be used.

    Personally, I decide what I like to use on subjective grounds. I'm not about to use something I don't like only because it saves a few seconds each day. Or vice versa.

    Again, though, a dock is a place to put icons. I still fail to see any real difference between a dock, a panel, a desktop, or any other place where we put icons, other than personal preference.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Beans
    6,028

    Re: Docks are Old.

    I've found all docs to be very slow to load at startup, even minimal Plank.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Beans
    277

    Re: Docks are Old.

    I find docks very practical compared to old style taskbars and load's of icons on the desktop.
    While yes window switching in unity is a lot harder then it should be I still like having a clean desktop, same thing with KDE with the help of icon only taskmanager,

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Tennessee
    Beans
    3,421

    Re: Docks are Old.

    Quote Originally Posted by buzzingrobot View Post
    Except in marginal instances, "computing resources" are of little consequence. If resources are adequate for a task, that's all that counts. There is no reward for "saving" resources that would not otherwise be used.
    If that's what makes you happy, I really don't care. I'm not here to tell you what to put on your computer.

    My setup saves me a lot of irritation and annoyance waiting on the computer to do incosequential things. I really like it because of that. That's the "reward".

    Personally, I decide what I like to use on subjective grounds. I'm not about to use something I don't like only because it saves a few seconds each day. Or vice versa.
    Where did I suggest that you shouldn't run what you want to run?

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Beans
    27

    Re: Docks are Old.

    Quote Originally Posted by Virtuality314 View Post
    They look awesome and they are really useful...but I am getting tired of looking at the same sort of thing all the time. Does anyone else share this opinion?
    Not me. I spend all my time doing things on my computer, and it really doesn't matter to me how I open an app. I used to care about making my computer pretty and change things around, but I guess age has a way of making you not care any more.

    I just want my computer to work so I can get things done. DE's/bells and whistles don't matter to me.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Beans
    27

    Re: Docks are Old.

    Quote Originally Posted by lykwydchykyn View Post
    Eventually, many of us get to a point where we realize that having a desktop that looks cool or works great for the average user is not nearly as compelling as having a desktop that is optimally efficient for what we personally do with it. That's the point where you dump Unity, GNOME, KDE, etc and switch to something like openbox, awesome, or Xmonad and hack it into something that is completely frictionless to you but incomprehensible to anyone else.
    Actually, a command line install with fluxbox or xfce can yield good results too. It will be lightning quick, but still have a somewhat traditional desktop.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Tennessee
    Beans
    3,421

    Re: Docks are Old.

    Quote Originally Posted by Sam Mills View Post
    Actually, a command line install with fluxbox or xfce can yield good results too. It will be lightning quick, but still have a somewhat traditional desktop.
    Yeah, I was being a bit tongue-in-cheek when I said that; but I think it's interesting how many long-time Linux users seem to resonate with that statement.

    I dropped KDE for awesome when I realized two things:

    - that I had launchers for applications on my dock, panel, menu, and desktop. Yet 9 times out of 10 I launched programs by typing their names into krunner, because I'm a verbal thinker, and it was more trouble to remember which blob of pixels went with which program.
    - that it took as much as four or five seconds to put a terminal window on the screen on my (at the time) modern and well-equipped machine, just because the windows were composited and the drawing was animated. Same hardware, without the eyecandy -- instant. I launch lots of terminals in my workflow.

    It was hard to let go of the eyecandy, I'll admit it; but I love what I have now even more.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    UK
    Beans
    613

    Re: Docks are Old.

    something that might help with the boredom, is to use xfce, configure 'panels' to be totally transparent so only icons show, make them different width and height, put at various edges of the screen, maybe even have them auto-hide.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Vermont
    Beans
    866
    Distro
    Ubuntu

    Re: Docks are Old.

    Quote Originally Posted by lykwydchykyn View Post
    Eventually, many of us get to a point where we realize that having a desktop that looks cool or works great for the average user is not nearly as compelling as having a desktop that is optimally efficient for what we personally do with it. That's the point where you dump Unity, GNOME, KDE, etc and switch to something like openbox, awesome, or Xmonad and hack it into something that is completely frictionless to you but incomprehensible to anyone else.
    Yes. This. About a year ago (because I couldn't and still can't customize Unity) I moved to XFCE. My desktop is very simple with the panel vertically on the left side. This gives me the most efficient use of my screen. The panel has everything I need. A one-click launcher gives me access to all my most frequently used applications (a lovely little feature in XFCE that allows one to make ones own menu). For the rest, I use synapse. I rarely access the "main menu" and I've removed all the docks (AWN and CAIRO).

    I used to be a big fan of docks, but now I find them gratuitous.

    I may try openbox one of these days, but I like the little compositing touches of XFCE. What I find interesting about this conversation is the hint of a backlash against the increasingly stylized and mannered DEs of Windows, Gnome, KDE, and to a lesser extent Apple and Ubuntu. I'm wondering if we will begin to see a more general backlash with a return to a more flexible and simpler interface. I must admit, Unity isn't bad that way, but Unity does force a certain work flow on users -- whereas DEs like XFCE, openbox and fluxbox leave it to the user.
    Linux: You reap what you tweak.

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •