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Thread: file issues, sheetrock damage....

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
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    The Left Coast of the USA
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    Hidden!
    Distro
    Kubuntu

    Re: file issues, sheetrock damage....

    Then gksudo should be addressed. sudo alone with graphical apps can wreak havok with file permissions in some circumstances.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
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    51

    Re: file issues, sheetrock damage....

    Quote Originally Posted by ManamiVixen View Post
    Try "sudo -i nautilus" instead.
    Code:
    doc@upstairsPC-Linux:~$ sudo -i nautilus
    Initializing nautilus-gdu extension
    Nautilus-Share-Message: Called "net usershare info" but it failed: 'net usershare' returned error 255: net usershare: cannot open usershare directory /var/lib/samba/usershares. Error No such file or directory
    Please ask your system administrator to enable user sharing.
    Enable user sharing?

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
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    525

    Re: file issues, sheetrock damage....

    Thats an ok error. Ubuntu dosen't have Samba installed by default and Nautilus was just pointing it out.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
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    525

    Re: file issues, sheetrock damage....

    But as QII stated, don't use sudo -i, I use it cause I know how to change the permissions when needed. Then again, it isn't that hard. Just right click a file or folder and it lists the permissions right there.

    Instead do:
    sudo mkdir /root/.config/nautilus

    then:
    gksudo nautilus

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    19th Hole
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    1,273
    Distro
    Ubuntu 13.10 Saucy Salamander

    Re: file issues, sheetrock damage....

    Quote Originally Posted by alabamatoy View Post
    This produces a dialog box that says "Nautilus could not create the required folder "/root/.config/nautilus <linebreak> Before running Nautilus, please create the following folder, or set permissions such that Nautilus can create it."

    This is where Microsoft has it all over Linux. "following folder"? There is nothing following. And I have no idea how to "set permissions such that Nautilus can create it". But I think this sudo file explorer is probably exactly what I need. So how do I fix this new problem?
    I agree with you that Linux error messages are often very obscure and frustrating. The error message should have simply omitted the word "following". It is referring to the /root/.config/nautilus folder. For what it's worth, I also find Windows error messages just as obscure and frustrating, but that's neither here nor there. I believe what is happening here is that trying to run nautilus (which is the file manager) as root requires a root user config directory. This has also happened to me in some installs, but absence of this directory has never prevented nautilus from launching, but only from storing anything like your preferences for your next use. In any case, you can create one by doing:
    Code:
    sudo mkdir /root/.config/nautilus
    This doesnt work, because under her account, the MS Windows partition is not visible or accessible. Maybe what I need is a /home/shared or something where all the users of this box can access and share files. That might work...
    How are you mounting the NTFS partition? Assuming that you are dual booting, here are the instructions for mounting your NTFS partition so that it is accessible to all users at boot. If your Ubuntu is a WUBI install, I'm not familiar enough with WUBI to advise you.

    ...this is what Im after - some reading to understand the concepts...
    Here is a megasite linking to many resources for Ubuntu and Linux.
    Newb: How far must I jump to clear the ledge halfway down?
    Guru: It's bad to jump off cliffs. Let's look at better options.
    Newb: Stop harping about "best practices" and just tell me.


  6. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
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    51

    Re: file issues, sheetrock damage....

    [QUOTE=DuckHook;12558104] In any case, you can create one by doing:
    Code:
    sudo mkdir /root/.config/nautilus
    When I run that I get : "mkdir: cannot create directory `/root/.config/nautilus': File exists" Yet every time I run nautilus, I get the same error. Ubuntu is quite frustrating....

    Quote Originally Posted by DuckHook View Post
    How are you mounting the NTFS partition? Assuming that you are dual booting, here are the instructions for mounting your NTFS partition so that it is accessible to all users at boot. If your Ubuntu is a WUBI install, I'm not familiar enough with WUBI to advise you.
    I have no idea how the NTFS partition is mounted, its all whatever the default Ubuntu setup configured it to be.

    I dont know what a "wubi" is, but I will do some reading and searching on that link. Thanks!

    I still cannot copy the folder to my wife's desktop. I have spent an hour or more already chasing this trivial, simple action. It would have been 15 seconds in MS Windows - open file manager, edit copy and navigate to destination folder and click paste. Im not liking Ubuntu thus far, or else there is a major obvious concept Im not getting etc.

    I have tried opening two Nautilus windows with sudo and the "copy to other window" is grayed out on both. This is getting very old. I dont want to be an Ubuntu or Linux expert, I want to be an Ubuntu USER.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
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    51

    Re: file issues, sheetrock damage....

    OK, so I log into Ubuntu under wife's account, open a terminal window, and attempt to run nautilus with sudo, and it tells me the password is wrong. For heaven's sake, this is bloody ridiculous!! Sudo should be sudo regardless of what user account its under. Im hating Ubuntu so far. I open "system settings" and click on "user accounts" and there's virtually nothing there, I cannot allow SUDO under wife's account there, I cant do much of anything except change passwords. Its all but useless. I am very frustrated with this inscrutable operating system. Im tired of trying to figure this out logically, because obviously, Ubuntu and I do not share any basis of same logic. I cannot get the built-in NIC to work ( http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2118634 ), I cannot get my printer to work ( http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2125711 ), and now this. If I dont make some progress pretty soon, Im gonna ditch Ubuntu for good. Can you blame me?

    I have a chemical engineering degree and a master in computers science, and Im a CISSP. I have a pretty good understanding of coding, I manage some websites with ASP code base, purchasing integrated with Paypal etc etc and TCP/IP and IPv4 and IPv6 and all that stuff. But this OS is killing me. If I cant figure these simple problems out, how on earth can the Ubuntu developers expect the layman to figure it out and make use of this OS? Someone needs to go back to the drawing board and start over. Or else theres something inherently screwed up with this particular install.

    And now Im getting "application update manager has closed unexpectedly". I click on "details" and I get a wonderful little spinning asterisk which just.....spins. So I click on "hide details" and select "send an error report to help fix this problem" and click "relaunch" and the process starts over. Ubuntu sux so far.

    OK, rant is over, back to problem at hand. Please tell me, how do I copy this folder from the windows share to a user's desktop, and ensure that the user has full rights to it?

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Beans
    5,405

    Re: file issues, sheetrock damage....

    Generally, with the default Ubuntu umasks, you need elevated privileges to write to somewhere that doesn't belong to you, but not to read from somewhere that does not belong to you. (Yes there are exceptions, such as reading root-owned files containing sensitive stuff like wireless credentials.) So, logged into your wife's account you should not need to use sudo to copy to her account from anywhere she can 'see' (i.e. has read permissions to).

    FWIW 'sudo' always wants the password of the invoking user (i.e. in this case your wife's) - if your wife's account does not belong to the sudo group it simply wont work.

    SUMMARY:

    - copying FROM your account TO her account will require sudo (and you will probably need to change the ownership of the copied files after)

    - copying TO your wife's account AS your wife: no sudo (nor gksudo), she just needs read permissions on the files she wants to copy, the copied files will become owned by her - MUCH EASIER

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    19th Hole
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    1,273
    Distro
    Ubuntu 13.10 Saucy Salamander

    Re: file issues, sheetrock damage....

    Firstly, an attempt to solve your immediate problem:

    I suspect that you are now logging in under your wife's account and trying to sudo from there. Ubuntu won't let you do this because your wife is not starting out with admin privileges. Otherwise, it would be easy for some bad guy to just log in as a guest and gain sudo privileges as well. You need to do one of two things:

    1. Do your sudo work from your own account (assuming that this was the account you originally set up), or
    2. Give you wife admin privileges. This is a one-time procedure that will allow her to elevate to sudo privileges thereafter.

    We will leave this to another time. Or you can research it on your own. At this point, let's just try to get your NTFS partition mounted permanently so that every user can see and use it. Here are the relevant steps from the link I gave you earlier:

    1. Log in to your own account.
    2. Make a backup copy of your fstab file by doing:
    Code:
    sudo cp /etc/fstab /etc/fstab_old
    3. Determine which NTFS partition you want to mount by doing:
    Code:
    sudo blkid
    From previous link...
    an example output from a computer setup with a Vista/Ubuntu dual-boot and shared NTFS data partition is shown here:

    /dev/sda1: LABEL="Recovery" UUID="B23613F43613B875" TYPE="ntfs"
    /dev/sda2: LABEL="Windows" UUID="38CE9483CE943AD8" TYPE="ntfs"
    /dev/sda3: LABEL="Data" UUID="519CB82E5888AD0F" TYPE="ntfs"
    /dev/sda5: UUID="00d7d951-2a35-40fd-8e5d-411bb824ff3b" TYPE="swap"
    /dev/sda6: LABEL="Ubuntu" UUID="6044b1d0-208e-4ab3-850d-03a92e1516fc" TYPE="ext4"

    The first three partitions, all NTFS, are the ones that concern us here. There are no FAT32 partitions. In this instance, all three NTFS partitions have partition labels, which makes it easier to identify the purpose of each. If your blkid output does not include partition labels, this means that the partitions do not have labels and you will have to determine which partition you wish to mount by another means. Of the three NTFS partitions, we are going to configure /etc/fstab with only the third, the Data partition.
    4. Create the directory we want to use for mounting the NTFS partition:
    Code:
    sudo mkdir /media/Data
    5. Edit your fstab file by bringing up gedit in admin mode with:
    Code:
    gksudo gedit /etc/fstab
    6. Create this line at the end of the file, replacing the example UUID with the output you actually get from your own earlier blkid command:
    Code:
    UUID=519CB82E5888AD0F  /media/Data  ntfs-3g  defaults,windows_names,locale=en_US.utf8  0 0
    ...If locale is not US, then substitute proper locale.

    7. Save and exit gedit. Reboot.

    These instructions are simply lifted from the instructions previously linked. Every user should now be able to access the NTFS partition you have defined.

    Secondly, some unsolicited advice:

    Ubuntu is not for everyone. In your case, it might be best for you to stick with the OS that you know. And no one would blame you, even if they were stuck-up enough to think it their business in the first place. However, it should be noted that you are trying to mount a non-native file system onto a multi-user environment while preserving Linux security--a non-trivial exercise by any measure. Windows won't even mount non-native partitions like ext4, so the contrast to the "ease" of Windows is hollow.

    Lastly, an observation:

    Frustration is completely understandable. Trying to do complex things in Linux is a tough learning curve. Many of us have been through it and sympathize with you. However, coming on a forum of enthusiasts, all of whom are volunteering their time and knowledge, and then dissing their favourite OS is not the best way to ask for help. As already said, if Ubuntu is not for you, then feel free to delete it.
    Newb: How far must I jump to clear the ledge halfway down?
    Guru: It's bad to jump off cliffs. Let's look at better options.
    Newb: Stop harping about "best practices" and just tell me.


  10. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Beans
    51

    Re: file issues, sheetrock damage....

    Quote Originally Posted by DuckHook View Post
    Firstly, an attempt to solve your immediate problem:

    I suspect that you are now logging in under your wife's account and trying to sudo from there. Ubuntu won't let you do this because your wife is not starting out with admin privileges. Otherwise, it would be easy for some bad guy to just log in as a guest and gain sudo privileges as well.
    I fixed this part, thanks.

    Quote Originally Posted by DuckHook View Post
    You need to do one of two things:

    1. Do your sudo work from your own account (assuming that this was the account you originally set up), or
    2. Give you wife admin privileges. This is a one-time procedure that will allow her to elevate to sudo privileges thereafter.
    Understood. Conceptually, to me, administratot should be administrator. But, as I am learning, its not. One must not be administrator, but also sudo all the time. I dont like this, I find it irritating and pointless, but I understand it and can live with it.

    Quote Originally Posted by DuckHook View Post
    1. Log in to your own account.
    2. Make a backup copy of your fstab file by doing:
    Code:
    sudo cp /etc/fstab /etc/fstab_old
    3. Determine which NTFS partition you want to mount by doing:
    Code:
    sudo blkid
    From previous link...
    4. Create the directory we want to use for mounting the NTFS partition:
    Code:
    sudo mkdir /media/Data
    5. Edit your fstab file by bringing up gedit in admin mode with:
    Code:
    gksudo gedit /etc/fstab
    6. Create this line at the end of the file, replacing the example UUID with the output you actually get from your own earlier blkid command:
    Code:
    UUID=519CB82E5888AD0F  /media/Data  ntfs-3g  defaults,windows_names,locale=en_US.utf8  0 0
    ...If locale is not US, then substitute proper locale.
    7. Save and exit gedit. Reboot.
    Wow.

    Quote Originally Posted by DuckHook View Post
    Lastly, an observation:

    Frustration is completely understandable. Trying to do complex things in Linux is a tough learning curve. Many of us have been through it and sympathize with you. However, coming on a forum of enthusiasts, all of whom are volunteering their time and knowledge, and then dissing their favourite OS is not the best way to ask for help. As already said, if Ubuntu is not for you, then feel free to delete it.
    You are correct, of course. But I would think that a group of people who are volunteering to support "their favorite OS" would embrace my situation and think to themselves "wow, maybe its time to move beyond some of this arcane command line stuff, and give users some easy "click here" kind of tools. For example, the partition access issue you kindly assisted me with above. Is it unreasonable to expect a "make available to all users" in the GUI somewhere?

    Like I said, I really didnt set out to LEARN Ubuntu, I set out to USE Ubuntu because of its reputation for security and stability. What I have learned thus far is that intuitively simple things (copying a folder, setting up a printer, getting network functioning using remote desktop) are incredibly difficult to do for the beginner, even one who is pretty competent in general with computers and networks. NOTHING thus far with my Ubuntu experience has been easy or simple. With all due respect to the community (and I sincerely mean that) I would think this would be taken as something more than "dissing their favourite OS" when its coming from a sincere person simply trying to use the "favorite OS".

    Thanks for the help, and I really, truly mean my "dissing" as constructive criticism. I do not mean it as snide or destructive.

    Thanks to all who have assisted and educated me thus far. I will probably be asking more stupid questions.......

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