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Thread: So I tried Debian Squeeze...

  1. #1
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    So I tried Debian Squeeze...

    What a pain in the butt that's been! ...half of the hardware doesn't work right...

    I spent so much time fixing my network issues and now I have sound issues. It's been such a pain that I'm probably going to remove it from that drive. I already use Ubuntu/RedHat/CentOS but Debian has been the biggest pain so far.

    Has anyone else had all these issues? (my hardware is brand new btw)

  2. #2
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    Re: So I tried Debian Squeeze...

    I haven't got terribly much experience with Debian, I've only tried it a couple of times. However, my main impression is that it isn't as "desktop ready" as for instance Ubuntu. It's more of a tinkerers desktop. When I tried it, it did not work out of the box. However, sometimes you just have bad luck, and your problems aren't necessarily the fault of the distro.

  3. #3
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    Re: So I tried Debian Squeeze...

    Yeah, I'm not blaming anyone but it's def been a pain. I had to work with some developers from Qualcomm to figure out what was wrong with the network driver (which worked perfectly well with CentOS) only to figure out my soundcard isn't working now. ugh!

  4. #4
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    Re: So I tried Debian Squeeze...

    Debian Squeeze is considered "stable". I feel more comfortable calling it "old".
    If you needed continued support for an older machine, I'd consider Debian Squeeze.
    You may have had better support upgrading to or installing Debian Wheezy "testing".
    There's a giant section on Upgrading from Squeeze at Debian.org here.

    There's a more to-the-point upgrade guide over at DoDebian. Here.

    Or, the official install-from-base directions straight from the horse's mouth.

    Debian has some more err... traditional linux views when it comes to software. You'll have to add third-party repositories for things like Firefox and Thunderbird.
    Right now, Linux Mint Debian Edition is based on Debian Testing. It may be better worth your time to give it a shot instead of pure Debian. Found here.

  5. #5
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    Re: So I tried Debian Squeeze...

    I'll second Linux Mint Debian Edition (LMDE). I've found that it offers a good mix of stability and rolling updates because they push out a frozen, tested copy of Debian Testing's repositories on a semi-rolling basis.

    If you really want to tinker, run Arch for a while...

  6. #6
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    Re: So I tried Debian Squeeze...

    I think your problem is probably down to the fact that debian is an unadulterated FOSS operating system with no proprietary packages available from the default repos. If you want or need proprietary drivers for wireless or graphic cards, you have to work and search a fair bit harder than you do in Ubuntu.

    I tried the LMDE, ie, Debian Edition version of Mint when it first appeared, thinking it would be just as easy as normal Mint, but it certainly was not the case, so I quickly gave up on it and went back to Mint, and then from that back to Ubuntu, which for some reason ran faster than Mint on my hardware.

    Ubuntu also seems more "pure", though I am not totally sure I know what I mean by that comment; it's just a personal choice thing.
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  7. #7
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    Re: So I tried Debian Squeeze...

    I've been running a distro based on Debian Wheezy for a little bit now, and yes, it does get complicated to set up certain features out of the box - but the list does continue on after that. I think it's just a different way of doing things, that does some getting used to. Hell I don't even come close to understand what I'm doing most of the time, but it runs very well on my system.

    Even though this is not the first time I've tried Debian, it is the longest I have stuck with it - it comes down to how much patience you have really. It either sinks in, you learn it and keep moving (to more complications) or you bin it and go back to basic everything functioning properly out of the box buntu (no offense buntu users)

    When it comes down to it - from the little I know about Debian these would be the key points before even attempting to install and run it.
    Do I have enough time to spend trying to figure this, that and the other out?
    Am I prepared to take a step deeper into the Linux world? Do I wish to (attempt) learn it?
    How much patience do I have? (before I throw my system out the window)
    Am I sure I have this much time to spend trying to figure out even the most basic things?


    And of course it all realy depends on how deep you want to go. If you just need a basic system and don't want to tinker with it. That's pretty easy (once you know how of course) but if you do like to play around and see what you are capable of doing, well prepare to feel frustration at it's finest.


    I do wonder sometimes (offtopic) how must it feel like to set up Arch the first time (without superior linux knowledge) because I had a hard time with Debian and yet Arch is meant to be infinately harder.
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  8. #8
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    Re: So I tried Debian Squeeze...

    Quote Originally Posted by ajgreeny View Post
    I tried the LMDE, ie, Debian Edition version of Mint when it first appeared, thinking it would be just as easy as normal Mint, but it certainly was not the case, so I quickly gave up on it and went back to Mint, and then from that back to Ubuntu, which for some reason ran faster than Mint on my hardware.

    Ubuntu also seems more "pure", though I am not totally sure I know what I mean by that comment; it's just a personal choice thing.
    I had a similar experience with LMDE when I first tried it (around Update Pack 4, I believe). Somewhere along the pipeline before Update Pack 5/6, though, a lot of the kinks got worked out for my hardware, so the newer releases run quite well.

    Personally, I think that illustrates a major benefit to the Linux community. You prefer Ubuntu, so you use Ubuntu. I prefer LMDE, so I use LMDE. Others might prefer <distro>, so they use <distro>. At the risk of sounding trite and overusing a word that's overused a lot already, I enjoy the freedom.

    Quote Originally Posted by kabukiM0n0 View Post
    I do wonder sometimes (offtopic) how must it feel like to set up Arch the first time (without superior linux knowledge) because I had a hard time with Debian and yet Arch is meant to be infinately harder.
    I don't know how it feels to set it up without *any* Linux knowledge, but when I used Arch for about a year, I didn't possess a great deal of knowledge, but thankfully I could follow the wiki and that worked out fairly well. Patience was a major part of, though, because although the setup wasn't too difficult, it took me several days before I had a system working to my liking. I found package availability lacking, even with the AUR (I could always compile from source, but I mean in the standard repos), but it was nice to be several major versions ahead of distros like Debian/Ubuntu. Can't beat living on the bleeding edge!
    Last edited by pythonscript; February 28th, 2013 at 10:24 PM.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Adam_GUI View Post
    Debian Squeeze is considered "stable". I feel more comfortable calling it "old".
    If you needed continued support for an older machine, I'd consider Debian Squeeze.
    You may have had better support upgrading to or installing Debian Wheezy "testing".
    Problem is that I want a solid, long-term stable release (for this particular case)... but it seems like you have to have old hardware to get Debian (stable) working easily.

    I've heard a lot of ranting and raving about Linux Mint and their distros, might give them a shot sometime.

    I'm an engineer, so I don't want to spend weeks trying to configure my tool... I want it to work and then I can spend weeks fixing my own software...lol
    Last edited by ozz_man; March 1st, 2013 at 03:55 AM. Reason: triple post

  10. #10
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    Re: So I tried Debian Squeeze...

    You could try Lucid - the server version is supported for another 2 years. I haven't had any problems with Squeeze. I've got it running the wiki at work.

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