Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Do and Don'ts, Tips and Tricks, Preventive, Predictive and Proactive Maintenance

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Beans
    55

    Do and Don'ts, Tips and Tricks, Preventive, Predictive and Proactive Maintenance

    Hello Everyone,

    Among all the forums here, it discuss solutions after the problem occurs. To makes some difference, I create this thread to avoid problem before it happen and to give solutions or advices before it occurs.

    We have the Do and Don'ts, Tips and Tricks and Preventive Maintenance of our Dear Ubuntu System. Your idea and keeping Ubuntu System up and running will do a great difference and a lot of help to others. This would be particularly helpful to our new Users in Ubuntu.

    Once again Welcome!!!

    They say, "A rolling stone gathers no moss".

    To start the stone rolling here are my tips:

    Tip: Choose wisely how to install your video card driver. You can do the manual or automatic.

    Do:
    Code:
    sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade && sudo apt-get dist-upgrade
    to up-to-date you Ubuntu system. I am using it to my Ubuntu 12.04 32-bit

    Do:
    Back-up your file by putting ".bak" (without the quotation) on your file name, like
    Code:
     cp /path/to/your/file/original.txt /path/to/your/file/original.bak
    Check these out

    http://www.desktoplinux.com/articles/AT2280165098.html

    http://www.computerhope.com/unix/ucp.htm

    Don't:
    Don't mess on something until you fully understands how it really works. Make sure you will not create conflicts on what you will do.


    Feel free to share how you put in shape your Ubuntu System





    Cheers,

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Beans
    55

    Re: Do and Don'ts, Tips and Tricks, Preventive, Predictive and Proactive Maintenance

    Installing a program/software using the Windows Platform, usually you look for Setup.exe. But in Ubuntu its a different thing.

    Tip: Use the Ubuntu Software Center to install, to install the software automatically. USC handles the download and installation without worrying shared lib or dependencies

    Some times what you need was not there on USC instead you got downloaded it from somewhere

    Tip: After downloading extract it where you want to place it. Follow its instruction, most times its in ReadMe.txt. Look for the .bin script and make it executable.

    Or you can go to terminal > go to the directory where you place it > and

    Code:
     ./executablefile.bin
    where "executablefile" is your application name. There are time you need a root privilege so you just add sudo like so

    Code:
     sudo ./executablefile.bin
    * To make it executable do(make sure you are in the current directory of that file you wish to make executable
    Code:
    sudo chmod +x excutablefile.bin
    Or if it is a source, after extracting it, go to the current directory using terminal
    do
    Code:
     ./configure.sh
    Code:
    make
    Code:
    make install
    I may not that good doing it but if you have do this in a better way, glad to see it posted here. Right me, if I got it wrong. I am happy to get it the right way


    Thanks for reading

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Beans
    55

    Re: Do and Don'ts, Tips and Tricks, Preventive, Predictive and Proactive Maintenance

    Hi to all viewers,

    I think I found it more convenient(for me, atleast) to update Ubuntu 12.04 using terminal. To do this, open a terminal and input

    Code:
    sudo apt-get update
    then supply your password

    Code:
    sudo apt-get upgrade
    or you can do the two command in one line

    Code:
    sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Beans
    55

    Re: Do and Don'ts, Tips and Tricks, Preventive, Predictive and Proactive Maintenance

    Cont...

    Sometimes you could encounter problems, you can do

    Code:
    sudo apt-get install -f
    then re-update



    Cheers,

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Hyperborea
    Beans
    1,441
    Distro
    Ubuntu

    Re: Do and Don'ts, Tips and Tricks, Preventive, Predictive and Proactive Maintenance

    After you have installed Ubuntu do this in a terminal, you will be asked for your password but it will not be displayed.
    Code:
    sudo lshw > hardware.txt
    This makes a file called hardware.txt in your home directory.
    If you need help with a hardware problem then you can easily scroll through this file and copy/paste the relevant details by opening the file in a text editor.
    Just double click the file to open it.
    Gedit is the default text editor in Ubuntu or just search in the dash for "text".

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Halloween Town
    Beans
    Hidden!
    Distro
    Xubuntu Development Release

    Re: Do and Don'ts, Tips and Tricks, Preventive, Predictive and Proactive Maintenance

    Quote Originally Posted by coldraven View Post
    After you have installed Ubuntu do this in a terminal, you will be asked for your password but it will not be displayed.
    Code:
    sudo lshw > hardware.txt
    This makes a file called hardware.txt in your home directory.
    If you need help with a hardware problem then you can easily scroll through this file and copy/paste the relevant details by opening the file in a text editor.
    Just double click the file to open it.
    Gedit is the default text editor in Ubuntu or just search in the dash for "text".
    +1 on colraven's advice.

    Chances are, specially if you're a new user, that you'll need the detailed information on the hardware configuration of the machine, and that's what this command does. It extracts the exact memory configuration, firmware version, mainboard configuration, CPU version and speed, cache configuration, bus speed, etc, into a txt file.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Auckland, NZ
    Beans
    3,786
    Distro
    Xubuntu 14.04 Trusty Tahr

    Re: Do and Don'ts, Tips and Tricks, Preventive, Predictive and Proactive Maintenance

    BACKUP before you trying installing anything unusual, or start playing with configuration files, drivers and so on. Then it's easy to go back if you make a terrible mess.

    BACKUP before installing a new version of Ubuntu or any other system. Make sure you've got your Windows restore DVDs prepared if you've got one of those computers that allows you to make DVDs from your restore partition.

    BACKUP regularly, anyway. It may be a pain but it's much less painful than realising that you've lost all your photos, your only copy of your dissertation, or other valuable files.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •