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Thread: Starting Python before xserver

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
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    2

    Starting Python before xserver

    I have been an avid Ubuntu user since 2010, and I have not been able to figure this one out: After my BIOS splash, there is just a black screen. Then, after 12 seconds, my login screen pops up and all is well. However, I was wondering if there was any way to start the Python-thingy before Xorg or even when the machine is first turned on. Help is most appreciated.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Beans
    2

    Wink Re: How can I easily upgrade from 10.10 to a newer version without losing application

    I have been an avid Ubuntu user since 2010, and I have not been able to figure this one out: After my BIOS splash, there is just a black screen. Then, after 12 seconds, my login screen pops up and all is well. However, I was wondering if there was any way to start the Python-thingy before Xorg or even when the machine is first turned on. Help is most appreciated.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    UK
    Beans
    Hidden!
    Distro
    Ubuntu 14.04 Trusty Tahr

    Re: Starting Python before xserver

    @archarank, I have moved your two identical posts to their own thread and given the thread what I hope is a suitable title. You posted to threads that had nothing to do with your question.

    Please do not post the same thing in different places as this dilutes community effort and please do not hijack other people's threads.

    Please do not PM me about your forum account unless you have been asked to. The correct place to contact an admin about your account is here.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Beans
    1,139

    Re: Starting Python before xserver

    You can start anything you wish at system startup, and there are several ways to do it. The answer depends upon what you wish to start, why you wish to start it, and what services it depends on to work properly.

    Generally, best practice for a system-level daemon that needs to run all the time (like ntp) is to use Upstart. System level services that don't need to run all the time, or root scripts, should usually be started by cron or dbus or Upstart.

    User-level scripts and applications have even more options for start-upon-login, or start-after-boot.

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