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Thread: 64 bit nvidia driver display issue

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Beans
    6

    Re: 64 bit nvidia driver display issue

    Quote Originally Posted by linux4me View Post
    I tried the nouveau driver for a while with my GT 440 but had too many problems with corrupted video. That's why I suggested he try the proprietary drivers.

    The nvidia drivers will still display in the additional drivers even though you no longer have them installed. You can verify that you're using nouveau by running the following in terminal if you don't believe the additional drivers page:
    Code:
    lspci -nnk | grep -iA2 vga
    I am not sure why you still have issues with the desktop. Someone above my pay grade will have to answer that for you. However, I don't think you'll do any harm by preceding with the installation of linux-headers-generic and one of the nvidia proprietary drivers as described above. I would try the experimental-304 driver if I were you since that's what worked with my GT 440, but there's no reason you can't try each of them and see which works best for you.
    Thanks for your help guys but I just deleted my linux partition. I'm done with Linux, it just doesn't work. I've tried like 4-5 different versions of it and they all have the same issues. I tried Linux a couple years ago and I just tried it again lately hoping it matured, but unfortunately it's still the same.

    Oh well.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Aotearoha
    Beans
    2,661
    Distro
    Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx

    Re: 64 bit nvidia driver display issue

    The root of the problem is optimus..

    Your h/w has hybrid graphics which is not supported directly by nVidia yet..

    You would have had to use Bumblebee to dynamically load/switch between nVidia & intel iGFX.
    You do not manually load the nVidia driver with Bumblebee..

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Beans
    9

    Re: 64 bit nvidia driver display issue

    Quote Originally Posted by bnosam View Post
    Thanks for your help guys but I just deleted my linux partition. I'm done with Linux, it just doesn't work. I've tried like 4-5 different versions of it and they all have the same issues. I tried Linux a couple years ago and I just tried it again lately hoping it matured, but unfortunately it's still the same.

    Oh well.
    It can be a challenge at times. Most modern PC work quite well with Linux, but especially with laptops it is a good idea to check whether there are issues before you buy, if you have the intention to use Linux. The simple fact is that most manufacturers make PC's Windows compliant and not for Linux. In you case you have Optimus for which Nvidia refuses to maken Linux-drivers and also refuses to give information to maken a open source driver.

    As for your problem

    Quote Originally Posted by bnosam View Post
    I installed Ubuntu 12.10 today on my Asus G73SW-A1. The graphics card in it is an Nvidia GeForce Gtx 460M, so I downloaded the linux drivers for it and installed them.

    Before I installed them, the default video driver let me view the screen in 1920 x 1080 resolution, now after this I'm stuck with 1024 x 768 or 800 x 600. I also can't see side bar, or the top bar now.
    I had exactly the same problem as you describe with an Nvidia GeForce Gtx 460. I installed all Nvidea's drivers and the result was the same. I found that strange since I had no problems in previous versions of Ubuntu.

    What did the trick for me was, what linux4me advised here. Especially this line:
    sudo apt-get install linux-headers-generic
    That did the trick, after that all the drivers installed fine. Windows look fine, panel and launcher are back, and I have my 1920x1080 back.

    I did some research on what are header files and why should we install them. Normally header files are only needed at compile time, and the executable (binary) does not need them after that. But Nvidia happens to be an exception to this rule: I quote

    NVidia is different because what they do is provide a binary chunk of proprietary code (pre-compiled but not runnable without some additional system-specific code) wrapped in some open source code that you must compile for your machine in order to use the driver. This way, NVidia can use the same core code for their Windows and Linux drivers, and just wrap the core in platform-specific code that hooks the driver into the OS. That's why installing the NVidia proprietary driver needs the kernel headers to be installed in order to compile (but the driver core itself is still proprietary and is actually pre-compiled platform-
    independent data).
    source
    I am quite sure you can solve the problem the same way as I had exactly the same symtoms. But of course Optimus will not work, so batterylife won't be as good as in Windows.
    Many thanks to linux4me

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