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Thread: Is using a standard anologue mic in Audacity an option?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
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    65

    Is using a standard anologue mic in Audacity an option?

    Greetings all,

    With Audacity (on Linux Ubuntu DreamStudio 12.04 LTS) up and running, at long last , I now notice that I can't yet add vocals. The one and only microphone I have is standard analogue (mono jack plug) - so that's probably why.

    I have been doing some internet research since, so as to find out if some degree of adaptation to PC requirements might be feasible here; a minijack adaptor over the mono jack and tweaking the microphone settings - in Audacity and system both, perhaps - possibly a start, I thought. But now it seems I'd be better served with some analogue-to-digital converter interface.

    In due course, I learned that the basic set-up for any home studio is Mic --> Pre-amp --> analogue-to-digital converter --> Recorder (Audacity, in this case). And, if necessary, from Recorder back to digital-to-analogue converter and monitors - but personally I don't have any need for monitors.

    Audacity is currently being used in conjunction with vintage four-track hardware in which pre-amps have already been integrated (for mikes, electric string instruments, and other stuff). Now, might my analogue mic, inserted into this four-tracker as normally, and an ADC interface placed between my four-tracker's mono/stereo output and PC line in/mic in indeed be yielding waveform in Audacity? And if the answer to is yes: can you recommend any ADC interfaces? I'm aiming for low-budget, presently.

    With a view on exchanging tracks with another musician, I also might need a mic with integrated ADC - for direct connection with a PC. In this scenario, is there any need for additional pre-amping, or will it be pretty much "plug an' play"? If the latter: any suggestions for a decent ADC mic (in the middle class range, preferably) wiill be appreciated.

    Thanks very much.

    tnob

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
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    1,092
    Distro
    Ubuntu Studio

    Re: Is using a standard anologue mic in Audacity an option?

    What is this "vintage four-track hardware"? Is that an analogue mixer?

    ADC is soundcard. So, just connect output from mixer to linein.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Beans
    9

    Re: Is using a standard anologue mic in Audacity an option?

    Yo dude,

    So you've got a 1/4 inch connector on your mic or 3.5mm?

    If its 1/4 inch you can get a minijack adapter, but as you say your going to be missing out on parts of the chain which it sounds like you could do with.

    So your going mic into pre-amp, into 4-track, o.k cool,

    You could go mic into pre-amp, then i'm guessing your pre-amp has possibly phono left and right out? (the red and white leads). If so all you need is a phono to 3.5mm convertor (into your computer line in), and yeah you should be hot to trot.

    If you need the 4 track simultaneous, because you wanna have a jam with other instruments in a live scenario, then go mic/pre-amp/through your 4-track and out via phono to 3.5mm. (this lead probs costs about 50p at any soundy/computer store). Make sure you set the levels right on your pre-amp/4-track or you'll get a load of hard-clipping which (unless desired) might degrade your general sound. *Note although you can push the sounds through the pre and 4-track into clipping, to acheive a warmer effect, taking it too far will waste your sound. As i'm sure your aware

    Bear in mind obviously the only levelling (tracks relevant to each other) you'll be able to do is on your analogue 4-track, so get the levels right if your going about it this way.

    Personally if your doing ****, in a studio fashion as opposed to live, it'd be better to go track at a time, this is easily do-able with audacity, get a click track playing, get some headphones on, and jam away/lay down some shiite.

    If your doing stuff in a live scenario an sm58 (80-90 quiddish) is a half-decent mic, to use, but i found for a studio sound on a budget, and tracking one at a time, you can't go wrong with a blue-yeti, although its a usb microphone, boo-hiss shout the purists lol , its a flipping decent condensor mic. Think its about 100 quid at the mo.

    If i had the cash i'd defo grab one myself.

    And no i don't work for blue-yeti lol.
    Last edited by Takanakathehacker; November 21st, 2012 at 01:21 AM.

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