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Thread: start up scripts inet, xinet, init confusion...

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
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    3

    start up scripts inet, xinet, init confusion...

    So I'm a bit confused about how ubuntu starts up. There are init scripts, xinet scripts and inet scripts. What are all of these and which ones should I use if I'm developing a service that I want to start up when my system boots.

    Can someone point me to some definitive answers?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
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    7,345
    Distro
    Lubuntu Development Release

    upstart

    Ubuntu currently uses upstart. It used to use System V. Maybe in the future it will use systemd. But for now it is Upstart.

    You can find the current upstart files in /etc/init/ You'll need to make a configuration file for your service and put it there.
    Look at some of the .conf files there for an idea how they are set up.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
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    7,345
    Distro
    Lubuntu Development Release

    System V

    I can't find anything authoritative on System V init scripts, or just don't know where to look. There is a discussion of runlevels here:
    http://linuxmafia.com/faq/Admin/init.html

    Ubuntu no longer uses System V init scripts, but not everything has been ported over to Upstart yet. So there are still scripts in /etc/init.d/ To use System V, you need a script in /etc/init.d that takes as options 'start', 'stop', 'restart', 'reload', 'force-reload' and 'status' Then update-rc.d is the tool to use to make a symlink to the script in the directories /etc/rcX.d/, where X is the runlevel. The script will be names with S or K, for start or kill, and then a sequence number. Lower numbers get executed first. When the system changes to a runlevel, all the scripts for that runlevel will get executed.

    However, that's rather moot now that Ubuntu has moved to Upstart.

    inetd and xinetd are a different matter. They are used to launch daemons on demand rather than leaving them running in the background as per System V or Upstart. That's about all inetd does, but xinetd can do a lot more in regards to restricting access and logging.

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